Samuel Laman Blanchard

From Wikiquote
Jump to: navigation, search

Samuel Laman Blanchard (May 15, 1804February 15, 1845) was an English poet, essayist and journalist.

Sourced[edit]

  • Sooth't were a pleasant life to lead,
    With nothing in the world to do
    But just to blow a shepherd's reed,
    The silent season thro'
    And just to drive a flock to feed,—
    Sheep—quiet, fond and few!
    • "Dolce far Niente", Stanza 1, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
  • Give me to live with Love alone
    And let the world go dine and dress;
    For Love hath lowly haunts...
    If life's a flower, I choose my own—
    'T is "love in Idleness".
    • "Dolce far Niente", Stanza 4, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).

Sketches from Life (1846)[edit]

Volumes 1-2

  • No longer would we imprison thee though thou art all gentleness and would chat and jest with us by the hour.
    • "A Quarrel with some Old Acquaintances".
  • It is an odd mode of diminishing one's own weakness to ask a friend to lend us the equal force of his.
    • "That Two Heads are Better than One".
  • What if two negatives make an affirmative ...does it follow that two nobodies shall be some body?
    • "That Two Heads are Better than One".
  • Two hats, we grant, may be better than one; yet is one enough at a time. It is so with the head. It should be sole and self-relying. We like to wear ours in single blessedness on our own shoulders, and not let it hanker after a place on other people's.
    • "That Two Heads are Better than One".
  • Wherever two or three are gathered together, one, at least, has left his head at home in his night-cap, or hung it up in his hat as he entered.
    • "That Two Heads are Better than One".
  • As with the tender juvenile, who sets light to his frock, so with the sweet senior, who sets his fortunes on fire. Even in his maturer time, in his state of cinderhood, he still craves to be further consumed.
    • "That a Burnt Child often Dreads the Fire".
  • We insist on self-roasting, by slow degrees, and at regular intervals, to show our contempt for experience, and to develop our chief virtue, which is obstinacy.
    • "That a Burnt Child often Dreads the Fire".
  • Man will take anything you like, except warning.
    • "That a Burnt Child often Dreads the Fire".
  • Forewarned, forearmed, is sheer nonsense. Who is so indefatigable a scribbler as your abundantly damned author? Which of our orators speak so long and so often as he whom nobody listens to? What actors are so constantly before the public as those whom the town will not go to see? Who so easy to deceive as the dupe who has been taken in all his days? The gamester is a legitimate child of that frail couple, Flesh and Blood; he loses a fourth of what he is worth at the first throw—esteems himself lucky if he loses less today than he did yesterday—goes on staking and forfeiting hour by hour—and parts with his last guinea by exactly the same turn of the dice which lost him his first. Experience leaves fools as foolish as ever.
    • "That a Burnt Child often Dreads the Fire".
  • It is surely one of the strangest of our propensities to mark out those we love best for the worst usage; yet we do, all of us. We can take any freedom with a friend; we stand on no ceremony with a friend.
    • "That Good Wine Needs No Bush".
  • We feel bound to be punctual and conscientious with those we are indifferent about; while we can afford at any time, on the frostiest night, to be an hour after our appointment with the single gentleman who occupies an apartment in our heart's core.
    • "That Good Wine Needs No Bush".
  • So, in our wisdom and fair justice we go on—"Giving to dust that is a little gilt, More laud than gold e'er dusted;" proclaiming the merits of the bad wine, and making it, by every token, as enticing as we can; and blessing our stars that the good will be found out by its flavor "without our stir." As it is inestimable, we seek not to win esteem for it; as it is beyond all praise, we bestow no praises upon it.
    • "That Good Wine Needs No Bush".
  • The starched matron is fain to put faith in the compliment which in her day of youth and grace she knew to be nonsense. ...If her mirror will not admit of this she has other resources; she has sage counsel, admirable judgment, perfect knowledge of the world. ...Tell her she is not to be imposed upon, and you impose upon her effectually. Admire her penetration, and you will not find her impenetrable.
    • "That Old Birds are not to be Caught with Chaff".
  • The ancient gentleman who has seen the world, who is profoundly experienced, and much too deep to be the dupe of an age so shallow as this, is to be won by an admiring glance at the brilliancy of his knee-buckle; praise his very pigtail, and you may lead him by it.
    • "That Old Birds are not to be Caught with Chaff".
  • None are so easily taken in as the "knowing ones." The knowing one is generally an egregious ninny. The man who loses his last shilling at Doncaster, is no other than he who was sure of winning; who could prove by his betting-book that he must win by backing Chaff against the field. He is a fine specimen of the family of Oldbirds. So is the careful, cautious wight, the original Master Surecard, the man of many savings, who in his old age falls in love with a loan; who dies in prison from the pressure of foreign bonds, or drowns himself in the new canal by way of securing what he calls his share. The genuine old bird is a pigeon.
    • "That Old Birds are not to be Caught with Chaff".
  • Everybody's word is worth Nobody's taking.
    • "That what Everybody Says must be True".
  • Social and political life is a Society for the Diffusion of Mendacity.
    • "That what Everybody Says must be True".
  • When a story has gone the grand circuit, and travels back to us uncontradicted, we may reasonably begin to relax in our belief of it. If nobody questions it, it is manifestly a fiction; if it passes current, it is almost sure to be a counterfeit. The course of truth never yet ran smooth.
    • "That what Everybody Says must be True".
  • There is an instinct that leads a listener to be very sparing of credence when a fact is communicated; it doesn't ring well in his ears—it has too much or too little gloss; he receives it with a shrug, and passes it on with a huge notch in it to show how justly it is entitled to suspicion; he is not to be imposed upon by a piece of truth. But give him a fable fresh from the mint of the Mendacity Society—an on dit of the first waterand he will not only make affidavit of its truth, but will call any man out who ventures to dispute its authenticity.
    • "That what Everybody Says must be True".
  • A genuine taradiddle of the gross and palpable kind never fails for want of vouchers. Hundreds know it to be true—hundreds more were all but eye-witnesses of the fact related—some actually were; all can attest it on their personal responsibility. Upon that point everybody has a reputation for veracity to stake—though the same stake had been forfeited fifty times; and everybody can contribute to the original story an unquestionable incident of his own coinage "to make assurance doubly sure." So it goes round, until the first projector hardly recognizes his own lie; and ends by believing ten times more absurdity than he had palmed upon others.
    • "That what Everybody Says must be True".
  • Credulity lives next door to Gossip.
    • "That what Everybody Says must be True".
  • Rumors confirm themselves when duly circulated.
    • "That what Everybody Says must be True".
  • As success converts treason into legitimacy, so belief converts fiction into fact, and "nothing is but what is not."
    • "That what Everybody Says must be True".
  • The scarcity of truth is atoned for by the abundance of affidavits; if a rumor be impugned, its veracity is easily strengthened by additional emphasis of affirmation, until at last "everybody says so," and then it is undeniable.
    • "That what Everybody Says must be True".
  • When the error is universal, it is supposed to end. The adoption of the foundling establishes its consanguinity.
    • "That what Everybody Says must be True".
  • Everybody is seldom to be believed. "They say" is not proof that they know. On dit is French for a fib.
    • "That what Everybody Says must be True".
  • Of all the many and (thanks to a free press) the ever-multiplying blessings attendant upon the "glorious constitution" of literature, not the least precious and profitable to a modern cultivator of systems and syllables, in pamphlets, magazines, and folios, is the right of Quotation.
    • "Quotations".
  • No prime-minister in the parliament of letters has, at any time, ventured to introduce a bill for the apprehension of all vagrant inverted commas that may be found trespassing in the sunny places of argument; and to restrain the poaching propensities of authors in general, who are apt to stroll without a license into the manors of other men's genius.
    • "Quotations".
  • Shall we not rejoice then and revel in the glorious liberty of extract, and quote to the thousandth line? Shall we not have pages like the Pyramids? Who ever skipped a quotation, though it made against the interest of the story? Besides, how many books might be numbered that are valuable only in a solitary quotation!—as the oyster is esteemed for the pearl it may sometimes contain.
    • "Quotations".
  • How often does it happen that an obscure line finds its way into a periodical... is requoted in every book that comes out during the next three months, and "sleeps again!"
    • "Quotations".
  • It is in the world of words, amid the dull but perhaps necessary detail of every-day events—that quotations come with a warmth and a welcome upon memory, and like Milton's fish, "Show to the sun their wav'd coats dropt with gold." …In the dry and laboring essay, amid the windings of many words and the accumulation of antecedents, we hail their sudden and familiar appearances as patches of Nature's green to repose on by the way; their "dulcet and harmonious breath" animates a train of associations that dwell in the most sylvan haunts of emotion and sentiment; to their fountains of "loosened silver" we turn for a refreshing and a pleasant abstraction.
    • "Quotations".
  • Perhaps the author cited is one of those, who, shunning the practice of the world, have taught the world to shun return! whose poetry is too finely spun, whose philosophy is too and mystified for popular demand: perhaps we have experienced feeling which Mr. Wordsworth alludes to, in a poem worthy of simplicity and loneliness of the sentiment—"Often have I sighed to measure By myself a lonely pleasure; Sighed to think I read a book Only read perhaps by me!"
    • "Quotations".
  • Two words of such a book, though possessing no peculiar signification, if met with in the dullest sentence, are enough: they call up, what has been finely termed, the "lightning of the mind." We feel an instantaneous kindness and reverence towards an author (together with a high opinion of his discrimination) who cites as it were the very language of our dreams—the secret converse of our own invisible spirit. We are almost startled at its being made public, and fancy that we have been at some time overheard reading. He is forthwith admitted a member of our heart's privy council. His hard words and bad reasoning are forgiven: we shut our ears to his angular periods—remembering only that his habits and desires, his sympathies, perceptions and enjoyments, are under the same master-key as our own—that he has struck into the same path, drank at the same brook, mused upon the same bank, and plucked almost the same leaf with ourselves.
    • "Quotations".
  • Pope abounds in quotable things, chiefly from his habit of making every line rest on its own merits—a circumstance that accounts, in its turn, for the strong resemblance his couplets bear to each other.
    • "Quotations".
  • Of Shakespeare, not a line but has been repeatedly, and will continue to be cited, as a commentary on the great and various volume of human nature.
    • "Quotations".
  • I must stop to lament, that we cannot evince an admiring gratitude towards other excellent things by a like readiness of quotation: that we cannot, for instance, quote a star that we have been watching; or a hue of sunset; or a friend's voice, and his shake of the hand (I had almost said heart); or a beautiful picture—a Claude or Titian, for example.
    • "Quotations"

Quotes about Blanchard[edit]

  • For more than twenty years he [Blanchard] toiled on through the most fatiguing paths of literary composition, mostly in periodicals, often anonymously; pleasing and lightly instructing thousands, but gaining none of the prizes, whether of weighty reputation or popular renown, which more fortunate chances, or more pretending modes of investing talent, have given in our day to men of half his merits.
  • The amiability of his disposition, and the thorough respectability of his character, no less than his ready talents and his growing repute, obtained for Laman Blanchard not only the society but the affection of many of the most eminent writers of his time.
    • Edward Bulwer-Lytton ibid.
  • His taste was formed in no exclusive schools, and he could admire whatever was good, no matter the rules or the contempt of rules by which it was produced. He was as free from envy and jealousy as a man can be; and few writers younger than himself will fail to remember the generous encouragement and seasonable notice which his connection with the press enabled his kindly temper to bestow.
    • Edward Bulwer-Lytton ibid.
  • From the date of our correspondence on this subject, I conceived a lively interest and a sincere friendship for Mr. Blanchard, which every year served to increase. It was impossible to know and not to love him. He was thoroughly honest, true, and genuine; ever ready to confer a kindness; and of a grateful disposition, which exaggerated into obligation the most commonplace returns to his own affectionate feelings and ready friendship. And yet ...we met more seldom than I could have wished, and, with a few exceptions among men of letters, our common associates were not the same.
    • Edward Bulwer-Lytton ibid.
  • For the author there is nothing but his pen, till that and life are worn to the stump: and then, with good fortune, perhaps on his death-bed he receives a pension—and equals, it may be, for a few months, the income of a retired butler!
    • Edward Bulwer-Lytton ibid.
  • No time had he for profound reading, for lengthened works, for the mature development of the conceptions of a charming fancy. He had given hostages to Fortune. He had a wife and four children, and no income but that which he made from week to week. The grist must be ground and the wheel revolve.
    • Edward Bulwer-Lytton ibid.
  • He never wrote up to the full mark of his powers; the fountain never rose to the level of its source. But in our day the professional man of letters is compelled to draw too frequently, and by too small disbursements, upon his capital, to allow large and profitable investments of the stock of mind and idea, with which he commences his career. The number and variety of our periodicals have tended to results which benefit the pecuniary interests of the author, to the prejudice of his substantial fame. ...There is a fatal facility in supplying the wants of the week by the rapid striking off a pleasant article, which interferes with the steady progress, even with the mature conception of an elaborate work
    • Edward Bulwer-Lytton ibid.
  • The volumes prefaced by this slight Memoir deserve a place in every collection of Belles Lettres, and form most agreeable and characteristic illustrations of our manners and our age. They possess what is seldom found in light reading, the charm that comes from bequeathing pleasurable impressions. They are suffused in the sweetness of the author's disposition; they shun all painful views of life, all acerbity in observation, all gall in their gentle sarcasm. Added to this, they contain not a thought, not a line, from which the most anxious parent would guard his child. They may be read with safety by the most simple, and yet they contain enough of truth and character to interest the most reflective. Such works, more than many which aspire to a higher flight, and address themselves to Truth with a ruder and more vigorous courtship, are calculated to enjoy a tranquil popularity, and a favored station amongst the Dead who survive in Books.
    • Edward Bulwer-Lytton ibid.
  • It seems to me that, with but slight reserve and modification, we may apply to our departed friend his own pathetic and beautiful elegy upon another.
    • see Eloquent Pastor Dead by Samuel Laman Blanchard as follows...
    • Edward Bulwer-Lytton ibid.

Eloquent Pastor Dead
He taught the cheerfulness that still is ours,
The sweetness that still lurks in human powers;
If heaven be full of stars, the earth has flowers!

His was the searching thought, the glowing mind;
The gentle will to others' soon resign'd;
But more than all, the feeling just and kind.

His pleasures were as melodies from reeds—
Sweet books, deep music, and unselfish deeds,
Finding immortal flowers in human weeds.

True to his kind, nor of himself afraid,
He deem'd that love of God was best array'd
In love of all the things that God has made.

He deem'd man's life no feverish dream of care,
But a high pathway into freer air,
Lit up with golden hopes and duties fair.

He show'd how wisdom turns its hours to years,
Feeding the heart on joys instead of fears,
And worships God in smiles, and not in tears.

His thoughts were as a pyramid up-piled
On whose far top an Angel stood and smiled—
Yet, in his heart, was he a simple Child.
Samuel Laman Blanchard

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:
Wikisource has original works written by or about: