Talk:Johnny Depp

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This page was kept after having been proposed for deletion. See Wikiquote:Votes for deletion/Johnny Depp. - InvisibleSun 03:03, 15 December 2008 (UTC)


I don't think anything in the "Sourced" section should remain here unless there's convincing evidence that Depp actually wrote these lines rather than merely delivering them. In the normal case, they should be credited to the screenwriter. 121a0012 04:27, 6 December 2006 (UTC)

The quote of ugliness is not from him it's from Gainsbourg a famous French artist, so he might have said it but it was not from his own though.

Unsourced[edit]

Wikiquote no longer allows unsourced quotations, and they are in process of being removed from our pages (see Wikiquote:Limits on quotations); but if you can provide a reliable and precise source for any quote on this list please move it to Johnny Depp.

  • In your teens and your 20s, you're immortal, you're untouchable. It's only later that you begin to realize you are mortal. (2004)
  • It’s amazing when you get to a certain age, and you talk about sleep in the same way you spoke about inebriates 20 or 25 years before. ‘Man, I got eight hours last night - it was fantastic.’ Happily, I haven’t found golf yet, but I’m sure that’s just around the corner. (2004)
  • Growing old is unavoidable, but never growing up is possible. I believe you can retain certain things from your childhood if you protect them - certain traits, certain places where you don't let the world go. (2004)
  • "I am an American. I love my country and have great hopes for it. It is for this reason that I speak candidly and sometimes critically about it. I have benefited greatly from the freedom that exists in my country and for this I am eternally grateful." (2003)
  • I would never insult the American people. I used the metaphor of a puppy dog, but I never said ignorant puppy dog. I said it’s a very young country compared to old Europe, or Asia. It was misinterpreted. I was talking about the government, and especially the current administration. Never about the troops, even if I was not particularly enthusiastic about going to Iraq or whatever. I love my country. But fuck, if want to say that I don’t agree with the president’s choices or words or intentions, so what? Even if I had said what they printed - which I didn’t - what’s the big deal? Some actor blurts out this thing - who gives a shit? He’s an actor! (2004)
  • I called them, three or four people, and I said, ‘It’s very easy for a publication to print whatever they want to print as a representation of me, but it’s not me. If you would allow me just a moment to represent myself ... if you still feel like I’m a shithead or a schmuck afterwards, then fine. But at least hear me out.’ These were heavy, right-wing, military people: one was a cop ... one had a nephew who’d been wounded in Iraq. I told them, ‘What was printed was ugly, but this is what I meant...' And each one of them said, ‘I understand.” [response to hate mail and calls he received following the Stern article] (2004)
  • The rags said, 'Well, he was drunk and he was having a huge fight with his girlfriend.' Complete bullshit! But, you know, let's say the guy over here in the bar, he's having a hard day, man, and eventually - one more stubbing of the toe - the guy's gotta hit something. So you punch a wall or do this and that. Fuck it, I'm normal and I want to be normal. But somehow I'm just not allowed to be. Why can't I be human? (1995)
  • The owner approached my publicist about two years after the incident and thanked her. Said, 'It was so great for us that Johnny got arrested at our hotel and sent to jail. You can't imagine the business we got out of it.' (2003)
  • I like the idea that I can make a drawing or I can make a painting or I can write notes, write my sort of journal thing, and someday my kid will have that. (1999)
  • I don't want to be limited by other people's opinions. (1988)
  • I don't necessarily want to always play the leading man - I'd like to shave my head and sew my eyeballs shut. (1988)
  • I want to keep growing and learning as much as possible. I want to fill myself in on all aspects of the industry - acting and directing. (1988)
  • I don't want to make a career of taking my shirt off. I'd like to shave off all my hair, even my eyebrows, try it that way. (1988)
  • I actually feel as though I make choices with my kids in mind. It helps me to be clear about what I will and won’t make. I want to have my kids say, “My pa did only the things that he felt he should do.” I don’t want them to be embarrassed. I think maybe they can be proud of some of the work I do. Maybe they will be proud that I decided to go against the grain a little bit and fight the good fight. When you’re older, drooling, and your children are changing your diapers, they will know that there was integrity.
  • Maybe I’m a dummy, but I don’t worry that a lot of my films haven’t had big results at the box office, because I’m not a businessman. Believe me, I would love for one of my movies to be accepted by a wide audience, but I’m not going to do a film just because it’s going to do that. (1999)
  • There are a number of years where you feel like you have to be a whore, be seen, flap your jaws, make small talk, meet the new hot filmmakers, know who's running what studio, and I couldn't do it. I didn't want to. And finally, you get out and take a breath, and you see what kind of life is available to you, and you go, 'I was right: I didn't have to play the game.' I've been very, very lucky. It's amazing I'm still around and able to get jobs. (2003)
  • I find it comforting not knowing new films, not knowing what’s happening out there. (2003)
  • What comes to my head is a simple, beautiful line from a Van Morrison song: It’s a hard road, Daddy-o. That line always kills me. The shit you put yourself through before you arrive. (2003)
  • All I can say is for a guy like me, who’s been dangling in this business for the last 20 years, to finally have something hit, it’s unexpected and very touching. (2003)
  • Nobody really knows what you're feeling, what you're really going for, what you're really trying to do. Hell, I didn't even know what I was going for. I just knew that I didn't want to be assembly line. (2004)
  • For a lot of years, I was really freaked out. Maybe I took it all too seriously, you know? I was freaked out about being turned into a product. That really used to bug me. Now, more and more, I enjoy the process. Creating a character, working that character into a scene, into the movie. I mean, the last couple of things have been just a ball. (2004)
  • Maybe I was just too dumb to sell out. (2004)
  • Shit, I may be doing TV in ten years. Or doing fucking appearances at a hamburger stand dressed as Captain Jack, you know? (2004)
  • I've kind of been able to glide through this weird little thing they call a career in terms of the business world and in terms of the industry in many movies that were considered absolute failures, flops. So I've kind of made a career of… failing. (2004)
  • I guess there have been times when I was on the brink of being bankable. But that's all so weird. All these weird lists - top five star, top 10, 'Let's get this guy because he's bankable.' I don't think about that. You're on the list two weeks and then ' poof - you're gone. It never jarred me that I wasn't on the list. If I'm considered bankable this week, that's great. Next week I'll be totally off. I'm used to that. (2004)
  • I've never had an allergy to the idea of commercial success. When you put a movie out and it's successful, that's great. I just wanted to get there in the right way, in a way that's not too compromising or demeaning or ugly. (2004)
  • I began acting, and I thought, Well, this is an interesting road; maybe I should keep traveling on it. I didn't know what the hell I was doing, so I started to read everything about acting - Stanislavsky, Uta Hagen, Michael Chekhov. I started soaking it up. (2004)
  • During [Edward Scissorhands] I got the phone call saying I was out of [21 Jump Street]. I felt like, 'Ah, possibilities.' I was freed up. I swore to myself that I would never again compromise to the degree that I had. I swore that I wouldn't just follow the commercial road. I wouldn't do what was expected of me or what was necessary to maintain whatever it is - a popular or financially rewarding career. I promised myself that I wouldn't do that. (2004)
  • I don't regret any of the things I didn't do, and I certainly don't regret any of the things I did do, down to the dumbest. Everything happened the way it should happen, even ridiculous things that I did in the beginning. I don't regret any of it. (2004)
  • I just want something different. I want to be surprised. I want something that doesn't feel formulaic or beaten to death. (2004)
  • Innocence and purity are definitely themes that I've plodded about in over the years. They're themes I'm fascinated with, because for me, growing up in America in the '50s and just into the '60s, there was still some kind of innocence. There was hope. (2004)
  • [About Tracey Jacobs, his agent]: Tracey's taken a lot of heat over the years. She has bosses and higher-ups, and every time I take on another strange project, they're going, Jesus Christ! When does he do a movie where he kisses the girl? When does he get to pull a gun out and shoot somebody? When does he get to be a fucking man for a change? When is he finally going to do a blockbuster? (2004)
  • The challenge for me is still to do something that hasn't been beaten into the moviegoing consciousness. Otherwise what am I in it for?" (2004)
  • I like not knowing what's happening out there -- who's doing what, how they were, what the box office was. Even when I'm in the soup bowl of Hollywood, I just play Barbies and hang out with the kiddies. (2004)
  • I have a lot of love inside me and a lot of anger inside as well. If I love somebody, then I'm gonna love 'em. If I'm angry and I've got to lash out or hit somebody, I'm going to do it, and I don't care what the repercussions are. Anger doesn't pay rent, it's gotta go. It's gotta be evicted. (1995)
  • I grew up in a very different kind of family environment although I didn’t know I was living a weird kind of existence until I would go to other kids’ homes and see how they lived. I also felt very alienated and isolated in school and some kids and one particular teacher would love to pick on me. So that made me pretty defensive and angry in some ways and you want to do anything to escape that kind of aggression you’re experiencing. (2004)
  • That was the dark side of me and a pretty dismal time in my life. It’s like someone you used to know and wonder why things looked so ugly from his perspective. (2004)
  • When I was 30 I wasn’t that convinced I would make it to 40, but maybe I had to go through all the crap that had built up inside me to get to a point where I could start enjoying life. (2004)
  • It’s too easy to blame other people and things in your past for your own self-loathing. (2004)
  • Strangely, even when I was miserable in my own life, I usually loved being on a film set and I truly revelled in the atmosphere of working with the director and the actors in creating something. Making films was always a refuge for me because I was totally focused on the work and not thinking about my own problems. (2004)
  • Oh man, I wasted so much time. I had great experiences, and a great education from all of it, but what a dumb-ass. I was just confused, and I didn't know what it was all about or what the point of anything was. I was just kind of pickling myself over a period of years. Self-medicating, trying to numb myself, and just being a self-centered prick, essentially. (2003)
  • Out on the street, you never know what you're getting, and suddenly two days later you're beating yourself in the head with a tennis racket, wearing a towel, quoting Poe. You don't want that for your kid. You really don't want that. (2003)
  • [I did] mostly alcohol. There were drugs, too - pills - and there was a danger that I would go over the edge. I could have. I thank God I didn't. (2004)
  • I was poisoning myself with alcohol and medicating myself. I was trying to numb things. I was trying not to feel things, and that's ridiculous. It's one of the dumbest things you can do, because all you're doing is postponing the inevitable. Someday you'll have to look all those things in the eye rather than try to numb the pain. (2004)
  • Thank God I never hooked on anything. I never had a monkey on my back. I just wanted to self-medicate, to numb myself through liquor. It's how I dealt with life, reality, stress, change, sadness, memories. The list goes on. I was really trying to feel nothing. (2004)
  • Family and friends sat me down and said, 'Listen, we love you. You're important to us, and you're fucking up. You're killing yourself. You're killing us in the process.' You don't listen right away because you're dumb. You're ignorant. You're human. Finally it seeps in. Finally the body and mind and heart and psyche just go, 'Yeah, you're doing the wrong thing.' (2004)
  • I could see things turning into a nasty tailspin. And then I thought, Maybe I'm slow, but this is ridiculous. Fuck it, just stop! So I stopped everything for the better part of a year. I guess I just reached a point where I said, 'Jesus Christ, what am I doing? Life is fucking good. What am I doing to myself?' Now I drink a glass or two of red wine and that's it. (2004)
  • You never think you're on the verge of disaster while you're looking over the edge yourself. It's your friends and family who are trying to get you to stop destroying yourself and after a while it kind of sank in and I just cleaned up my act. (2004)
  • I feel like there was a fog in front of my eyes for 36 years, and the second [Lily-Rose] was born, that fog just lifted and everything became totally clear and focused. To say it’s the greatest thing that’s ever happened to me is the understatement of the century. Look at me, I’ve become a cliché. (1999)
  • [Having a family] gave me everything. A reason to live. A reason to not be a dumb-ass. A reason to learn, a reason to breathe, a reason to care. It gave me everything. (2003)
  • [Jack's] a hellcat, boy, he's something. The best training you can have for toddlers is having spent a number of years hanging out with drunks. Helping them walk, cleaning up their vomit, putting ice on their head when they fall and smack it on the table; the uncontrollable rage and tears and joy all in, like, ten seconds. He's just a cool little drunk. (2003)
  • When I told [my brother] Vanessa was pregnant, he said, "Congratulations. You'll never sleep the same way again. You'll never have another calm day as long as you live, but it's worth it." He said it just off-the-cuff, but it was right on the money. (2004)
  • Having my own children has just ripped away a lot of the confusion and insecurity that had been dragging me down for pretty much my entire life. I never knew what happiness was until I met Vanessa and we had our first child. (2004)
  • Being with Vanessa and having children has made things very easy and clear for me. There’s nothing dark about my world anymore. I watch our son and daughter playing around the house or learning new things and I wonder what on earth could be more beautiful than that. (2004)
  • I don't have to close my eyes to see [my dream life] because I live with it every day - with my kids, my girl, and my life. It's as perfect as it could possibly be. (2004)
  • I just kind of stumbled around for 35 years. And then when my daughter arrived, it was like Now, I see. Suddenly everything else is just kind of shavings, morsels, little tidbits. And this is what it's all about. This is real life. Boy, it couldn't have come at a better time. (2004)
  • More than anything, I love being with my family. I'm like a total homebody, just hanging out with my kids. (2004)
  • If someone were to harm my family or a friend or someone I love - I would eat them. I might end up in jail for 500 years - but I would eat them. (2006)
  • It took kind of meeting that right girl, her getting pregnant, and that whole beauty of nine months waiting for the kid and then BOOM — there's your baby and you go, 'My God, there is my life.' (2006)
  • The same moment your child is born, you're born. You're brand-new, because you are revealed finally to yourself. You're meeting yourself for the first time. And it's about being okay with yourself, not hating yourself anymore. (2006)
  • Vanessa brings me the joy of living, stability, and—most obviously—love. Thanks to her, I feel like a simple human being, and not like a Hollywood actor known all over the world. She taught me to see life differently. I am more optimistic than before. And especially, she inspires me.
  • The last thing in my head was a relationship, a girlfriend, anything. I remember the first few days hanging out with Vanessa; in the front of my brain I'm thinking, No way. A real guy thing, you know? No fucking way, man. But somewhere in the back is the real truth, and you know you're fucked. It was practically like I'd said 'Never' - and boom. You know? Boom. (2003)
  • After we started dating I worked a long, long day and night, and I came home, back to my apartment in Paris, at three or four in the morning. Vanessa was there, and she was cooking for me. That's not to say that a woman must cook for a man, that's not what I'm saying, but it took me by surprise. It was a whole new ball game for me. I'd never experienced that before. It was like she was a woman not afraid to be a woman. I hope that doesn't sound weird or sexist, because it's not. I'm totally in agreement that women are the stronger, smarter, more evolved sex. (2004)
  • When I met Vanessa, I was still drifting. But being with her has just blown me away and made me a better man. Ten years ago I never would have believed in the kind of life I have now as a father, although I still wonder if it’s OK to be this happy. (2004)
  • For all intents and purposes, we are married. We have two kids together, and she's the woman of my life. If she ever said, "Hey, lets get hitched," I would do it in a second. We'll do it if the kids want us to, or maybe when the kids are old enough to enjoy it with us. (2004)
  • I pretty much fell in love with Vanessa the moment I set eyes on her. As a person, I was pretty much a lost cause at that point of my life. She turned all that around for me with her incredible tenderness and understanding. Very quickly, I realised I couldn’t live without her. She made me feel like a real human being instead of someone Hollywood had manufactured. It sounds incredibly corny and phony, but that’s exactly what happened to me and what she has meant to me. (2004)
  • I was definitely ready to have someone be there for me when I met Vanessa but it was much more than that. She had this incredible self-assurance and naturalness to her whole way of being that it just made me feel so good to be around her. You can’t explain it but you can feel it. (2004)
  • Vanessa and I have considered ourselves husband and wife since the day we moved in together. It’s not a big issue for us because we know what we feel for each other and that kind of connection is what’s going to keep us together for a very long time. Marriage would just be a formality. (2004)
  • I'd just thank the people out there who have been with my up-and-down, weird-road, strange career and supported me and stuck with me all these years. I mean, they're my boss. That's what keeps me working. (2004)
  • It’s been very good to me, this country [France]. It's been welcoming, and it's given me what I've always wanted - a really cool, simple life. (2003)
  • Living [in France] has been good for me. It's given me the opportunity that when I do come back to Hollywood I can almost enjoy it. (2003)
  • [Being in France] was amazing at first, because I didn't speak the language. I loved that, because I didn't have to talk. It was great just to be out among people and not have the responsibility to say anything. I wasn't thrown into the spotlight to be the novelty or to entertain. (2004)
  • Ultimately, though, what I love about being [in France] is the culture, which is very old. (2004)
  • I wasn't the best kid in the world, but I wasn't an axe murderer, either. (1988)
  • I was 15, I think, [when my parents divorced]. It had been coming for quite a long time. I'm surprised they lasted that long, bless their hearts. I think they tried to keep it together for the kids, and then they couldn't anymore. (2004)
  • [My childhood] was strange, though then again, it was normal to us. It wasn't until I started going to other kids' houses and hanging out, having dinner, seeing what a family is supposed to do that I saw that we weren't normal. (2004)
  • There was this vicious woman [at school], a teacher. If you weren't in her little handpicked clique, you were ridiculed and picked on. She was brutal and unjust. One day she told me to do something, I can't remember what. Her tone was nasty. She got very loud in my face in front of the rest of the class and tried to embarrass me. I saw what she was doing, that she was trying to ridicule me. I turned around and walked away. As I did, I dropped my drawers and mooned her. She went out of her mind. Then of course I was brought before the dean and suspended for a couple of weeks. At that time it was coming anyway. I knew my days were numbered. (2004)
  • We lived in a small house, and nobody argued in a whisper. We were exposed to [my parents’] violent outbursts against each other. That stuff sticks. (2004)
  • It's easy to make a million bucks in this business doing stuff that would exploit the piss out of you. It's like fast food. Get in frame, get the product out there, and sell it quick. (1988)
  • If there's anything I really want, it's privacy. Maybe I should do what Brando did 30 years ago - buy an island. Maybe take my girl and some friends and just go there and sleep. And read, and swim and think clear thoughts. Because you really can't do that here. You can't be normal… you can't just hang out and have a cup of coffee and pick your nose. (1999)
  • I really, more than anything, despise the competitive thing that just sort of is in this industry… It would be different if it were kill or be killed, but it's not. (2004)
  • I think Polanski is one of the few filmmakers who nearly did a perfect film, a couple of them. Chinatown is almost perfect. It may be perfect. (2004)
  • I enjoyed acting and I loved the process, but at the same time I hated the celebrity that came with it even though I know it’s part of the game and the recognition you need to have people come see your movies. I just couldn’t get my head into the place where I could just enjoy the attention and deal with it on that level instead of feeling stalked and paranoid about it. I’m a lot cooler about it now. (2004)
  • When you meet someone like Hunter Thompson and watch him, get to know him - people say whatever they want to say about Hunter and his books - he's pure, he's absolutely pure. There's really not an ugly bone in the guy's body. (2004)
  • Everybody compares everyone to James Dean these days. If you're lucky, they mention Brando or De Niro or Sean Penn. It's like they have to compare you to somebody. They invite you to put on an instant image. (1988)
  • Especially in the beginning, they have to be able to label the product. So they just go -'Rebel. This one's a rebel.' Wow, I had no idea! There's that hideous pressure they hit you with initially, based on your image and how you look, and I never tended that garden. I was always scared shitless of that - it's really limiting and very dangerous. (2003)
  • For many years they said I was a wild man. Now they say I'm a former wild man, former bad boy, former rebel. I guess 'former' because now I'm a dad. The media tries to stuff you into a mold. It happens to everybody. (2004)
  • I'm an old-fashioned guy. I want to be an old man with a beer belly sitting on a porch looking at a lake or something. (1999)
  • [Brando’s] maybe the greatest actor of the last two centuries. But his mind is much more important than the acting thing. The way that he looks at things, doesn't judge things, the way that he assesses things. He's as important as, uh, who's important today? Jesus, not many people... Stephen Hawking! (1995)
  • One of the most important things I learned in the couple of times I worked with Marlon Brando, and just by spending time with him, is it's okay to have a ball. It's okay to have fun and fuck up because, after all, it's only film. If you're able to get to a place where maybe your only motivation in the scene is to make the crew giggle, that's okay too. (2003)
  • I honestly have no clue how to play [piano]. But if you walk into a room with a baby grand, you’re kind of obligated to fuck around on it. (2003)
  • I was more interested in music than anything else. Music was like life. I had found a reason to live. (2004)
  • Music was huge for me. I loved playing the guitar and playing in a band and just hanging out with guys who loved music and pretty much felt the same way about school and life that I did. Even though I knew at one point that I would never be a great guitar player, I still loved the freedom that came from playing in a band. My band was good enough to open for Iggy Pop and that was a wild time for us. Music was the thing that got me out of pumping gas and indirectly led me into acting. (2004)
  • I was 12 when my mom bought me a $25 electric guitar. I had an uncle who was a preacher, and his family had a gospel singing group. He played guitar in church, and I used to watch him. I became obsessed with the guitar. I locked myself in my bedroom for the better part of a year and taught myself chords. I'd try to learn things off records. (2004)
  • As a guitarist, I would always look for whatever felt right, something tasteful - and I guess I still do. [I’m] more interested in finding what fits the piece musically as opposed to how many notes I can play quickly. I was never one of those ‘look at me’ players. (2004)
  • I'm attracted to the people who are considered freaks. Since I was young, I've identified with characters considered by "normal" society to be outcasts and oddballs. (1999)
  • I never considered myself an outsider. But I definitely didn't consider myself an insider. (2006)
  • We've always had our run-ins with the paparazzi. That hasn't changed. They are very ambitious. They're looking for God knows what. (2004)
  • It's ugly. I don't mind so much when [the paparazzi] do it to me, but when it's my kids, that's another story. It's evil. (2004)
  • I haven't changed my thinking about those guys very much! Even in France, I still have them staking me out and watching our house in the countryside. I don't see the point of guys earning their living by taking photos of me and Vanessa walking our kids to a playground. But I'm trying not to let myself get worked up about it anymore. That just makes them even more money and they know that so some of them try to provoke you that way. So I've stopped playing into their hands. I'm just trying to be a boring family guy so there's no value to taking my photo anymore. (2004)
  • What's very confusing for them is why there are people who want to take Mommy and Daddy's photograph. So we have a little game where we hide our face in Daddy's shoulder. When we get in the car and we've passed all the photographers, then we can bring our face out. They don't need to be exposed to the absurdity of that frenzy. Lily-Rose asks, "Why do they want to take your picture?" My answer is always the same: "I don't know." Because I don't. (2004)
  • When I was a kid I used to have these dreams. But they weren't dreams. I was awake, but I couldn't move. I couldn't speak. And a face would come to me. Someone told me it was the spirit of someone who died that was very close and never got to say something that they wanted to say. And I believe it. (1995)
  • Fidelity is important as long as it's pure. But the moment it goes against your insides - if you want to be somewhere else, if she wants to dabble - then you need to make a change. (1998)
  • I would hope to think that this is maybe hell. Maybe this is hell because then we could go on to something else. Because this ain’t so bad. (1995)
  • When I grew up my uncle was a Baptist minister, a heavy-duty 'Hallelujah praise God' guy. I was exposed to that and didn't quite buy into it. Not so much the belief in something, more my uncle; it was like he went into character to become the preacher, and even as a kid I thought, 'There's something funny here.' (2004)
  • We overcomplicate things, if you get down to the real base needs of a human being. We don't wake up every morning and go, 'Thank God, another day.' Yet every time we take in a breath, it's a gift." (2004)
  • The thing is, he [River Phoenix] came with his guitar to the club. You could cut me open and vomit in my chest because that kid... what a beautiful thing that he shows up with his girl on one arm and his guitar on the other. He came to play and he didn’t think he was going to die - nobody thinks they’re gonna die. He wanted to have a good time. It’s dangerous. But that’s the thing that breaks my heart, first that he died, but also that he showed up with his guitar, you know? That’s not an unhappy kid. (1995)
  • What a waste. What a waste of a talented, beautiful guy. Obviously, whatever 'it' is, he had it. He was luminous - a brilliant guy with great taste. But on the other side of that, he was a kid, and that can be a dangerous thing to be, especially in that world, being in that position. I was very lucky I pulled out of it, but River - he didn't get out. There was so much ahead for him. Like the beauty and the luxury of making a family. (2003)
  • I'm going to do everything I can - fight tooth and nail - to not be put in some teen-idol category. (1988)
  • I could do a Bruce Willis thing and make a record now, but it would just milk my teen-boy, pop-idol image. I'd rather do nothing than do that. (1988)
  • When I see people with perfect teeth, it drives me up the wall. I'd rather swallow a tick than have that! (1995)
  • I like being confused, I enjoy the look it leaves on my face.
  • The only gossip I'm interested in is in the Weekly World News- 'Woman's bra bursts, 11 injured.' That kind of thing.
  • I've always liked everybody. [Laughs.] I'm not sure everybody likes me.
  • I love our house in the country. I can walk to the nearby village and have a coffee and no one pays any notice. I'm just another dad with my daughter on my knee. The time I've spent in France with Vanessa has solidified my belief that I can keep a major distance from Hollywood and still keep in the game. Acting is my living, but I don't want to live it. Living in France is the first time I can honestly say I feel at home.
  • Awards are not as important to me as when I meet a 10-year-old kid who says, "I love Captain Jack Sparrow."
  • Am I a romantic? I've seen "Wuthering Heights" 10 times. I'm a romantic.
  • I don't pretend to be "Captain Weird", I just do what I do.
  • The term "serious actor" is kind of an oxymoron, isn't it? [Like] "Republican Party" or "airplane food."
  • So the American Dream - I don't think it exists at all. I think it's propaganda.
  • If you haven't made some mistakes by 28, it's abnormal.
  • Ugliness is better than beauty. It lasts longer and, in the end, gravity will get us all.

  • I'm shy, paranoid, whatever word you want to use. I hate fame. I've done everything I can to avoid it.
    • attributed without citation at flixster
  • As a teenager I was so insecure. I was the type of guy that never fitted in because he never dared to choose. I was convinced I had absolutely no talent at all. For nothing. And that thought took away all my ambition, too.
    • attributed without citation at flixster
  • "I've never been one of those guys who goes out and screws everything in front of him."
    • attributed without citation at flixster
  • "This is a rumor-filled society and if people want to sit around and talk about whom I've dated, then I'd say they have a lot of spare time and should consider other topics... or masturbation."
    • attributed without citation at flixster
  • "Anything I've done up till 27 May, 1999 was kind of an illusion, existing without living. My daughter, the birth of my daughter, gave me life."
    • attributed without citation at flixster
  • [on the money he makes] "You use your money to buy privacy because during most of your life you aren't allowed to be normal."
    • attributed without citation at flixster
  • [about one of his old teachers asking for an autograph] I mean, what was I supposed to say? He'd failed me. I remember one time this teacher yelled at me so heavily in front of the entire class. He didn't have any time for me then, and now, all of a sudden, he wants my autograph?
    • attributed without citation at flixster
  • I can remember when I finished Edward Scissorhands (1990), looking in the mirror as the girl was doing my make-up for the last time and thinking -- it was like the 90th or 89th day of shooting -- and I remember looking and going, "Wow, this is it. I'm saying goodbye to this guy, I'm saying goodbye to Edward Scissorhands". You know, it was kind of sad. But in fact, I think they're all still somehow in there.
    • attributed without citation at flixster