Tiny Furniture

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In high school, you were always the "I have to go home" girl. Are you still the "I have to go home" girl?

Tiny Furniture is a 2010 American independent comedy-drama written by, directed by, and starring Lena Dunham.

Nadine[edit]

Dialogue[edit]

Siri: Do you have the same sense of entitlement as my daughter.
Charlotte: Oh believe me, mine is much worse.

Charlotte: In high school, you were always the "I have to go home" girl. Are you still the "I have to go home" girl?
Aura: I have to go home.

Aura: I have no experience.
Charlotte: It's absolutely fine. On my resume under "skills", I put "has a landline".

Charlotte: You know the thing about your friends? They weren't assholes, were they?
Aura: No, not at all.
Charlotte: See, that's the problem. Our people are assholes. Our moms are assholes.
Aura: You think my mom's an asshole?
Charlotte: Yeah. She's too successful not to be.

Charlotte: I think the issue is that it reflects badly on Aura as an authority figure...
Nadine: You know what else reflects badly? Walking through my party with no pants on.
Charlotte: That's a good point.

Quotes about Tiny Furniture[edit]

  • Comedy evolves. We long ago bid adieu to the physical acrobatics of Buster Keaton, the wisecracks of Bob Hope, the witty repartee of Cary Grant and Irene Dunne. The now-reigning comedy of embarrassment, seen in the films of Judd Apatow and the Farrelly Brothers and all the loss-of-virginity farces, seems particularly appealing to younger viewers, who can relate to the awkward silences of crushes, being stuck with someone who is clearly physically undesirable, or being oneself the nerdy companion of some repulsed hottie, that power imbalance being the kernel of the jest — though by the final credits, said nerd usually ends up with said hottie. Lena Dunham’s work is related to this mainstream comedy of embarrassment, but she takes it one bold step further, producing a much more subtle and sophisticated comedy of chagrin. And in Dunham’s world, there is no happy ending, only an enlightened realism.

External links[edit]

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