Comfort

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Every condition of comfort reveals in turn its discomfort, and these discoveries go on for ever. Hence the new want is not so much a want of those who have it directly, but is created by those who hope to make profit from it. ~ Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
A scholar who loves comfort is not worthy of the name. ~ Confucius
Whoever prefers the material comforts of life over intellectual wealth is like the owner of a palace who moves into the servants’ quarters and leaves the sumptuous rooms empty. ~ Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach
Most of the luxuries, and many of the so called comforts of life, are not only not indispensable, but positive hindrances to the elevation of mankind. ~ Henry David Thoreau

Comfort is a sense of physical or psychological ease, often characterized as a lack of hardship.

Quotes[edit]

  • It's grand, and you canna expect to be baith grand and comfortable.
  • What! said Obstinate, and leave our Friends, and our Comforts behind us! Yes, said Christian, because that all, which you shall forsake, is not worthy to be compared with a little of that that I am seeking to enjoy.
  • Tomorrow is another day” is something you can say only to yourself, not to the person you want to comfort.
    • Fausto Cercignani in: Brian Morris, Quotes we cherish. Quotations from Fausto Cercignani, 2014, p. 27.
  • One's physical comforts and wants, therefore, should be ordered according to the demands of health and strength, not according to the calls of pleasure. And if we will only bear in mind the superiority and dignity of our nature, we shall realize how wrong it is to abandon ourselves to excess and to live in luxury and voluptuousness, and how right it is to live in thrift, self-denial, simplicity, and sobriety.
  • A scholar who loves comfort is not worthy of the name.
  • Whoever prefers the material comforts of life over intellectual wealth is like the owner of a palace who moves into the servants’ quarters and leaves the sumptuous rooms empty.
  • In those lower activities, which have no higher aim than to make us more comfortable and more cowardly, in actions of cunning, actions that steal and lie, actions that divorce the speculative from the practical faculty, and put a ban on reason and sentiment, there is nothing else but drawback and negation.
  • [Steven Spielberg's films] are comforting, they always give you answers and I don't think they're very clever answers. … The success of most Hollywood films these days is down to fact that they're comforting. They tie things up in nice little bows and give you answers, even if the answers are stupid, you go home and you don't have to think about it. … The great filmmakers make you go home and think about it.
  • What the English call “comfortable” is something endless and inexhaustible. Every condition of comfort reveals in turn its discomfort, and these discoveries go on for ever. Hence the new want is not so much a want of those who have it directly, but is created by those who hope to make profit from it.
  • Is there no balm in Gilead?
    • Jeremiah, VIII, 22. "Is there no treacle in Gilead?" Version from the "Treacle Bible" (1568). Spelled also "truacle" or "tryacle" in the Great Bible (1541), Bishops' Bible (1561).
  • And He that doth the ravens feed,
    Yea, providently caters for the sparrow,
    Be comfort to my age!
  • That comfort comes too late;
    'Tis like a pardon after execution;
    That gentle physic, given in time, had cur'd me;
    But now I am past all comforts here, but Prayers.
  • Most of the luxuries, and many of the so called comforts of life, are not only not indispensable, but positive hindrances to the elevation of mankind. With respect to luxuries and comforts, the wisest have ever lived a more simple and meager life than the poor.
  • Material comforts ... are small, but the soul clings to them: it considers them every day and from very close; in the end they hide the rest of the world from it.
  • Mothers obtain it from their children, and men from their dogs.
  • The evolutionary urge drives man to seek for intenser forms of fulfillment, since his basic urge is for more life, more consciousness, and this contentment has an air of stagnation that the healthy mind rejects. (This recognition lies at the centre of my own 'outsider theory': that there are human beings to whom comfort means nothing, but whose happiness consists in following an obscure inner-drive, an 'appetite for reality'.)

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations[edit]

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 124.
  • They have most satisfaction in themselves, and consequently the sweetest relish of their creature comforts.
  • Miserable comforters are ye all.
    • Job, XVI, 2.
  • From out the throng and stress of lies,
    From out the painful noise of sighs,
    One voice of comfort seems to rise:
    "It is the meaner part that dies."
  • Thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.
    • Psalms, XXIII, 4.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

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