Essentialism

From Wikiquote
Jump to: navigation, search

Essentialism is a term coined by New York Times best-selling author Greg McKeown in his book Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less but Better. Essentialism involves doing less, but better, so you can make the highest possible contribution. It isn’t about getting more done in less time. It’s not about getting less done. It’s about focusing on only the most essential things. It’s about challenging the core assumption of ‘I can have it all’ and ‘I have to do everything’ and replacing it with the pursuit of ‘the right thing, in the right way, at the right time’. It’s about regaining control of our own choices about where to spend our time and energies instead of giving others implicit permission to choose for us.


Popular Quotes from the Book[edit]

“Essentialism is not about how to get more things done; it’s about how to get the right things done. It doesn’t mean just doing less for the sake of less either. It is about making the wisest possible investment of your time and energy in order to operate at our highest point of contribution by doing only what is essential.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“Remember that if you don’t prioritize your life someone else will.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“The word priority came into the English language in the 1400s. It was singular. It meant the very first or prior thing. It stayed singular for the next five hundred years. Only in the 1900s did we pluralize the term and start talking about priorities.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“We overvalue nonessentials like a nicer car or house, or even intangibles like the number of our followers on Twitter or the way we look in our Facebook photos. As a result, we neglect activities that are truly essential, like spending time with our loved ones, or nurturing our spirit, or taking care of our health.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“Essentialists see trade-offs as an inherent part of life, not as an inherently negative part of life. Instead of asking, “What do I have to give up?” they ask, “What do I want to go big on?” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“We can either make our choices deliberately or allow other people’s agendas to control our lives.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“Just because I was invited didn’t seem a good enough reason to attend.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“Only once you give yourself permission to stop trying to do it all, to stop saying yes to everyone, can you make your highest contribution towards the things that really matter.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“What do I feel deeply inspired by?” and “What am I particularly talented at?” and “What meets a significant need in the world?” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“We often think of choice as a thing. But a choice is not a thing. Our options may be things, but a choice—a choice is an action. It is not just something we have but something we do.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“It is about making the wisest possible investment of your time and energy in order to operate at our highest point of contribution by doing only what is essential.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“NO IS A COMPLETE SENTENCE. —Anne Lamott” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“The way of the Essentialist means living by design, not by default. Instead of making choices reactively, the Essentialist deliberately distinguishes the vital few from the trivial many, eliminates the nonessentials, and then removes obstacles so the essential things have clear, smooth passage. In other words, Essentialism is a disciplined, systematic approach for determining where our highest point of contribution lies, then making execution of those things almost effortless.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“Once an Australian nurse named Bronnie Ware, who cared for people in the last twelve weeks of their lives, recorded their most often discussed regrets. At the top of the list: “I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.”6 This requires, not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials, and not just getting rid of the obvious time wasters, but cutting out some really good opportunities as well.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“What if we stopped celebrating being busy as a measurement of importance? What if instead we celebrated how much time we had spent listening, pondering, meditating, and enjoying time with the most important people in our lives?” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“There should be no shame in admitting to a mistake; after all, we really are only admitting that we are now wiser than we once were.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“The pursuit of success can be a catalyst for failure. Put another way, success can distract us from focusing on the essential things that produce success in the first place.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“Only once you give yourself permission to stop trying to do it all, to stop saying yes to everyone, can you make your highest contribution towards the things that really matter.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“You have to look at every opportunity and say, ‘Well, no … I’m sorry. We’re not going to do a thousand different things that really won’t contribute much to the end result we are trying to achieve.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“If it isn’t a clear yes, then it’s a clear no.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“The reality is, saying yes to any opportunity by definition requires saying no to several others.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“...the faster and busier things get, the more we need to build thinking time into our schedule. And the noisier things get, the more we need to build quiet reflection spaces in which we can truly focus.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“Falling into “the undisciplined pursuit of more” [is] a key reason for failure.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“Many capable people are kept from getting to the next level of contribution because they can’t let go of the belief that everything is important.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“There are no solutions. There are only trade-offs.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

“For too long, we have overemphasised the external aspect of choices (our options) and underemphasised our internal ability to choose (our actions). This is more than semantics. Think about it this way. Options (things) can be taken away, while our core ability to choose (free will) cannot be. The ability to choose cannot be taken away or even given away – it can only be forgotten.” ― Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less


External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:

- See more at: http://gregmckeown.com/essentialism-the-disciplined-pursuit-of-less/#sthash.o3f0tits.dpuf