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Diaprepes abbreviatus, the citrus root weevil (class Insecta, order Coleoptera)

An arthropod (from Greek arthro-, joint + podos, foot) is an invertebrate animal having an exoskeleton (external skeleton), a segmented body, and jointed appendages. Arthropods form the phylum Arthropoda, and include the insects, arachnids, myriapods, and crustaceans.


  • Ha! Whare ye gaun, ye crawlin' ferlie?
    Your impudence protects you sairly;
    I canna say but ye strunt rarely
    Owre gauze an' lace;
    Though faith! I fear ye dine but sparely
    On sic a place.
    • Robert Burns, To a Louse, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 464.
  • Fair insect! that, with threadlike legs spread out,
    And blood-extracting bill and filmy wing,
    Dost murmur, as thou slowly sail'st about,
    In pitiless ears full many a plaintive thing,
    And tell how little our large veins would bleed,
    Would we but yield them to thy bitter need.
    • William Cullen Bryant, To a Mosquito; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 530.
  • The Sphinx atropos squeakes when hurt,
    nearly as loud as a mouse, which, when
    uttered in the most plaintive tone, natural-
    ly shocks the human heart, and makes it
    shudder at the thought of destroying inof
    -fensive animals merely for the sake of curi-
    osity. I cannot help reflecting on this tyr-
    anny, this wanton cruelty, exercised by
    thoughtless man, on many animals, but
    especially in insects: 'tis certain, that every
    animal possessing life, has feeling; and,
    therefore, is as capable of suffering pain,
    as of enjoying pleasure; and, as Shake-
    speare humanely expresses “The poor bee-
    tle crushed beneath the foot, feels the
    pangs of death as great as when a mon-
    arch falls.” Gentle reader, pardon this di-
    gression, my feelings commanded my pen."
    • James Barbut, The Genera Insectorum of Linnæus, Exemplified by Various Specimens English Insects drawn by Nature, (1781)
  • What gained we, little moth? Thy ashes,
    Thy one brief parting pang may show:
    And withering thoughts for soul that dashes,
    From deep to deep, are but a death more slow.
    • Thomas Carlyle, Tragedy of the Night Moth, Stanza 14; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 530.
  • Thou art a female, Katydid!
    I know it by the trill
    That quivers through thy piercing notes
    So petulant and shrill.
    I think there is a knot of you
    Beneath the hollow tree,
    A knot of spinster Katydids,—
    Do Katydids drink tea?
  • Meanwhile, there is dancing in yonder green bower,
    A swarm of young midges, they dance high and low;
    'Tis a sweet little species that lives but one hour,
    And the eldest was born half an hour ago.
    • Owen Meredith (Lord Lytton), Midges; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 512.
  • A work of skill, surpassing sense,
    A labor of Omnipotence;
    Though frail as dust it meet thine eye,
    He form'd this gnat who built the sky.
    • James Montgomery, The Gnat; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 315.
  • The midge's wing beats to and fro
    A thousand times ere one can utter "O."
    • Coventry Patmore, The Cry at Midnight; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 512.
  • The spider's touch, how exquisitely fine!
    Feels at each thread, and lives along the line.
  • In an evolutionary instant about 540 million years ago, there was an explosive diversification of multicellular animals. It is called the Cambrian explosion... Most of the major groups of marine animals, except fishes, appeared at that time, including sponges, echinoderms, and, most notably, arthropods.
    • Stanley A. Rice, Life of Earth: Portrait of a Beautiful, Middle-aged Stressed-out World (2011)
  • Siquidem et per naturam pleraque mutationem recipiunt, et corrupta in diversas species transformantur; sicut de vitulorum carnibus putridis apes, sicut de equis scarabei, de mulis locustae, de cancris scorpiones.
    • Many creatures go through a natural change and by decay pass into different forms, as bees [are formed] by the decaying flesh of calves, as beetles from horses, locusts from mules, scorpions from crabs.
    • Isidore of Seville Etymologiae Bk. 11, ch. 4, sect. 3; p. 221. Translations and page-numbers are taken from Ernest Brehaut An Encyclopedist of the Dark Ages: Isidore of Seville (New York: B. Franklin, [1912] 1964).
  • To a first approximation, all multicellular species on earth are insects.
    • N. E. Stork 2007. Biodiversity: world of Insects. Nature 448, 657-658 (9 August 2007)
  • Where the katydid works her chromatic reed on the walnut-tree over the well.
    • Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass, Song of Myself, Part 33, line 61; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 415.
  • Happy the Cicadas live, since they all have voiceless wives.
    • Xenarchus (Grecian poet), quoted in Charles Darwin, Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex (1876).

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