Lydia Sigourney

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Lydia Sigourney

Lydia Huntley Sigourney (née Lydia Howard Huntley) (September 1, 1791 – June 10, 1865) was an extremely popular American poet during the early and mid 19th century. She was commonly known as the "Sweet Singer of Hartford." Most of her works were published with just her married name Mrs. Sigourney.

Sourced[edit]

  • We speak of educating our children. Do we know that our children also educate us?
    • Reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 51.
  • The glorified spirit of the infant is as a star to guide the mother to its own blissful clime.
    • Reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 53.
  • The strength of a nation, especially of a republican nation, is in the intelligent and well-ordered homes of the people.
    • Reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 324.

About[edit]

  • As a dedicated, successful writer, Lydia Sigourney violated essential elements of the very gender roles she celebrated. In the process, she offered young, aspiring women writers around the country an example of the possibilities of achieving both fame and economic reward.
    • Melissa Ladd Teed, Domesticity and Localism: Women's Public Identity in Nineteenth-Century Hartford, Connecticut (1999).

External links[edit]

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