Status quo

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Status quo is a Latin phrase meaning the existing state of affairs, particularly with regard to social or political issues..

Quotes[edit]

Quotes are arranged chronologically.
  • New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but because they are not already common.
    • John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689).
  • Habit with him was all the test of truth,
    It must be right: I’ve done it from my youth.
    • George Crabbe, The Borough (1810), Letter iii, "The Vicar", line 138.
  • Certainly none of the advances made in civilization has been due to counterrevolutionaries and advocates of the status quo.
  • Humans are allergic to change. They love to say, "We've always done it this way." I try to fight that. That's why I have a clock on my wall that runs counter-clockwise.
    • Grace Hopper, The Wit and Wisdom of Grace Hopper (1987)
    • Unsourced variant: The most dangerous phrase in the language is, "We've always done it this way."
  • Satisfied powers are those that have reached the top of the pecking order, are happy with their lot, and are primarily interested in preserving the status quo. In contrast, rising powers are states on the move. They are not satisfied with their lot, are usually struggling for recognition and influence, and are therefore looking for ways to overturn the status quo.
  • Change tends to fill people with this incredible fear.
  • As the generalization goes about the art industry, people can be really challenging and thought-provoking in their thinking and questioning the status quo, and it's really important that the status quo can be questioned and that there are people doing that.

See also[edit]