Calmness

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Calmness is the mental state of being free from agitation, excitement, or disturbance. Calmness can most easily occur for the average person during a state of relaxation, but it can also be found during much more alert and aware states. Some people find that focusing the mind on something external, or even internal, such as the breathing, can itself be very calming. Calmness is a quality that can be cultivated and increased with practice. It usually takes a trained mind to stay calm in the face of a great deal of different stimulation, and possible distractions, especially emotional ones.

Quotes[edit]

  • O haste to shed the sovereign balm—
    My shattered nerves new string:
    And for my guest serenely calm,
    The nymph Indifference bring.
    • Frances Greville, Prayer for Indifference, published in the Edinburgh Chronicle (April 19, 1759).
  • How calm, how beautiful comes on
    The stilly hour, when storms are gone!
    When warring winds have died away,
    And clouds, beneath the glancing ray,
    Melt off, and leave the land and sea
    Sleeping in bright tranquillity!
    • Thomas Moore, Lalla Rookh (1817), Fire Worshippers, Stanza 62.
  • 'Tis Noon;—a calm, unbroken sleep
    Is on the blue waves of the deep;
    A soft haze, like a fairy dream,
    Is floating over wood and stream;
    And many a broad magnolia flower,
    Within its shadowy woodland bower,
    Is gleaming like a lovely star.
    • George D. Prentice, To an Absent Wife, Stanza 2; published in The Guardian: Volume 4 (1853), p. 115.
  • The noonday quiet holds the hill.
  • Pure was the temperate Air, an even Calm
    Perpetual reign'd, save what the Zephyrs bland
    Breath'd o'er the blue expanse.

External links[edit]

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