Dutch proverbs

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"A good example will gain much following." The windmill is a symbol of the highly agricultural Netherlands.
"The devil invented questioning."

A proverb is a pithy expression stating wisdom believed to be true by the majority of the population. Contrary to a saying, the proverb is always phrased the same way.

A[edit]

  • Aan de vruchten kent men den boom.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • "Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents."
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 488. ISBN 0415096243. 
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Aanval is de beste verdediging.
    • English equivalent: The best defence is a good offense.
    • "You are more likely to win if you take the initiative and make an attack rather than preparing to defend yourself."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 21. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 30 June 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 518. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Acht is meer dan duizend.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 701. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Al draagt een aap een gouden ring, het is en blijft een lelijk ding.
    • English equivalent: A golden bit does not make the horse any better.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 53. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Afwisseling verheugt.
    • English equivalent: Variety pleases.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 89. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Alle waar is naar zijn geld.
    • English equivalent: Everything is worth its price.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 800. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Alle waarom heeft zijn daarom.
    • English equivalent: Every why has a wherefore.
    • "Everything has an underlying reason."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 80. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 22 September 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 765. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Als de berg niet tot Mohammed wil komen dan moet Mohammed naar de berg gaan.
    • English equivalent: If the mountain will not come to Mohammed, Mohammed must go to the mountain.
    • "If you cannot get what you want, you must adapt yourself to the circumstances or adopt a different approach."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 135. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Source: Coolen, J.; Steerneman, Pim; Vandormael, Jan (2004). Kind in de knel: ontwikkelingsstoornissen in de praktijk van de jeugdzorg: samen-werken. Garant. p. 99. ISBN 2804159671. 
  • Als je hem een vinger geeft, neemt hij de hele hand.
    • English equivalent: Give him an inch he will take a yard.
    • Source: Hiligsmann, Philippe; Theissen, Siegfried (2008). Néerlandais - Expressions et proverbes: Intermédiaire-avancé. De Boeck Supérieur. p. 228. ISBN 2804159671. 
  • Als 't schip lek is gaan de ratten van boord.
    • English equivalent: Rats desert a sinking ship.
    • A leader or organization in trouble will quickly be abandoned.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1150. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Alles komt op zijn tijd.
    • English equivalent. He that can have patience can have what he will; Patience is a remedy for every sorrow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 87. ISBN 0415160502. 

B[edit]

  • Beter alleen, dan in kwaad gezelschap.
    • It is better to be alone than to be in bad company.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 162. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Beter één vogel in de hand dan tien in de lucht.
    • Better is one bird in the hand than ten in the air.
    • English equivalent: A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
    • "Something you have for certain now is of more value than something better you may get, especially if you risk losing what you have in order to get it."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 28. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 29 July 2013. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 8. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Beter laat, dan nooit.
    • Better late, than never.
    • English equivalent: Better late than never.
    • "It is better that somebody arrives or something happens later than expected or desired, than not at all."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 25. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 30 June 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 584. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Beter hard geblazen, dan de mond gebrand.
    • Better to have blown hard, than to have a burned mouth.
    • English equivalent: Better safe than sorry.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 881. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Beter voorkomen dan genezen.
    • English equivalent: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 332. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Bezint eer gij begint.
    • English equivalent: Look before you leap.
    • "The man who thinks before he acts, is most likely to act with discretion, and have no future cause to repent of his conduct; but he who acts blindly, without any foresight, will probably suffer for his rashness."
    • Trusler, John (1790). Proverbs exemplified, and illustrated by pictures from real life. p. 115. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1069. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Blaffende honden bijten niet.
    • Barking dogs don't bite.
    • English equivalent: Barking dogs seldom bite.
    • People who make the most or the loudest threats are the least likely to take action.
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 20 June 2013. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 5. ISBN 0415160502. 

D[edit]

  • De appel valt niet ver van de boom.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • "Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • De baard maakt geen wijsgeer; anders was er de bok goed aan.
    • English equivalent: If the beard were all, the goat might preach.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 117. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • De baas wordt altijdt het slechtst bedient.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 661. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De draad breekt daar hij zwakst is.
    • English equivalent: A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.
    • "A weak part or member will affect the success or effectiveness of the whole."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 38. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 31 July 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 19. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • De duivel heeft het vragen uitgevonden.
    • The devil invented questioning.
    • Laan, Heidt (1979). Nederlandse spreekwoorden/spreuken en zegswijzen. Elsevier. p. 82. 
  • De eersten zullen de laatsten zijn.
    • English equivalent: The last will be first, and the first last.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1085. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De geschiedenis herhaalt zich.
    • English equivalent: Something that has happened once can happen again.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De gestadige drup holt de steen.
    • English equivalent: A constant drip wears the stone.
    • "A drop hollows out the stone by falling not twice, but many times; so too is a person made wise by reading not two, but many books."
    • (Giordano Bruno, Il Candelaio)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 187. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • De grote vissen eten de kleine.
    • English equivalent: People are like fish; the big ones devour the small.
    • "Small organizations or insignificant people tend to be swallowed up or destroyed by those that are greater and more powerful."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 1 July 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1086. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De mens wikt, maar God beschikt.
    • English equivalent: Man proposes but God disposes.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 103. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Die mij bemint, bemint ook mijn hond.
    • English equivalent: Love me, love my dog.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 953. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De muren hebben oren.
    • English equivalent: walls have ears.
    • "What you say may be overheard; used as a warning."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 287. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 27 September 2013. 
    • Source: Bodegom, Gerda; Donaldson, Bruce (2005). Colloquial Dutch 2: The Next Step In Language Learning. Routledge. p. 80. ISBN 0415310776. 
  • De ouderdom zal men eeren, al zou men ook ze met stokken slaan.
  • De rook van het vaderland is aangenamer dan een vreemd vuur.
    • English equivalent: Dry bread at home is better than roast meat abroad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 754. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De toekomst is een boek met zeven sloten.
  • De uitkomst zal het leren.
  • De uitzondering bevestigt de regel.
    • The exception confirms the rule.
    • Source: Verklarend Handwoordenboek Der Nederlandse Taal. Taylor & Francis. 1971. p. 118. 
  • Des volks stem is Gods stem.
    • English equivalent: The voice of the people is the voice of God.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1164. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De waarheid wil niet altijd gezegd zijn.
    • English equivalent: All truths are not to be told.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 282. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De weg naar de hel is geplaveid met goede voornemens.
    • The road to hell is paved with good intentions.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 257. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Die den honing wil uithalen, moet het stijken der bijen ondergaan.
    • English equivalent: Honey is sweet, but the bees sting.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 837. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Die eens steelt is altijd een dief.
    • English equivalent: Once a drunkard always a drunkard; Once a thief always a thief.
    • "People keep telling us who they are, but we ignore it - because we want them to be who we want them to be."
    • Lisa Albert, Janet Leahy, Matthew Weiner, Mad Men (2010)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 771. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Die goed doet, goed ontmoet.
    • English equivalent: If you do good, good will be done to you.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 160. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Doet naar mijn woorden en niet naar mijn werken.
    • English equivalent: Preachers say: do as I say, not as i do.
    • "It bears no reason that others should show greater love to me, than I have showed them."
    • John Locke, Second Tract of Government (1662)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 706. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Door de bomen het bos niet meer zien.
    • English equivalent: Missing the forest because of the trees.
    • Theissen, S. and P. Hiligsmann (1999). Uitdrukkingen en spreekwoorden van A tot Z: Dictionnaire n√©erlandais-fran√ßais d'expressions et de proverbes Explication, traduction et exercices, De Boeck Universit√©.

E[edit]

  • Een bloode hond word zelden velt.
    • English equivalent: Discretion is the better part of valor.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 130. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een dichter wordt geboren, een redenaar word gemaakt.
    • English equivalent: Poets are born, but orators are trained.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 331. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een drenkeling klemt zich aan een strohalm vast.
    • English equivalent: A drowning man plucks at a straw.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 33. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een gek zegt wel eens een wijs woord..
    • English equivalent: A fool may give a wise man counsel.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 40. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een gewaarschuwd mens telt voor twee.
    • A warned man counts as two.
    • English equivalent: Warned is forearmed.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 103. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een gierigaard is nooit rijk.
    • Covetousness is its own stepmother.
    • English equivalent: The covetous man is good to none and worst to himself.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 83. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Een goede naam is beter dan olie.
    • English equivalent: A good name is the best of all treasures.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 58. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een kat in de zak kopen.
    • English equivalent: Let the buyer have thousand eyes for the seller wants only one.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1101. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Een kroum hout brandt zowel als een recht.
    • English equivalent: Crooked logs make straight fires.
    • "One learns taciturnity best among people who have none, and loquacity among the taciturn."
    • Jean Paul Richter, Hesperus, XII.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 70. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een mens zijn zin is een mens zijn leven.
    • English equivalent: His own desire leads every man.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Een slecht werksman beschuldigt altijd zijn tuig.
    • A bad craftsman blames his tools.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 4. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Een spiering uitwerpen, om een kabeljaauw te vangen.
    • To throw a smelt, to catch a codfish.
    • English equivalent: Set a herring to catch a whale.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 16. 
  • Elk waant dat zijn uil een Valk is.
    • English equivalent: Every man thinks his own geese swans.
    • "This proverb imitates that an inbred Philauty runs through the whole Race of Flefh and Blood. It blinds the Underftanding, perverts the Judgment and depraves the Reafon of the Diftinguishers of Truth and Falfity."
    • Divers Proverbs, Nathan Bailey, 1721 [1]
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 42. 
  • Er is niets nieuw onder de zon.
    • English equivalent: Nothing is new.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1114. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Er schuilt een adder in 't gras.
    • English equivalent: Look before you leap, for snakes among sweet flowers do creep.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1070. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Er zijn geen ergere blinden dan die niet zien willen.
    • English equivalent: There are none so blind as they who will not see.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 320. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Er zijn geen ergere doven dan die niet horen willen.
    • English equivalent: None so deaf as those who will not hear.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1110. ISBN 0415096243. 

G[edit]

  • Ga niet op het uiterlijk af.
    • English equivalent: Never judge by appearances; Judge not a man and things at first sight.
    • "No good Book, or good thing of any sort, shows its best face at first."
    • Thomas Carlyle, Essays, "Novalis"
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 713. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Geeft men hem den duim, dan wil hij er de vingers nog bij hebben.
    • English equivalent: Give him an inch and he will take a yard.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 240. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Geen geld, geen Zwitsers.
    • No money, no swiss.
    • English equivalent: Nothing for nothing.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 223. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Geduld gaat boven geleerdheid.
    • Patience goes beyond knowledge.
    • English equivalent: An ounce of patience is worth a pound of brains.
    • Patience can often do more than your wits.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 415. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Geld mot rollen.
    • Money must roll.
    • English equivalent: Money is there to be spent.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1013. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Gen haar zoo klein of het heeft ook zijn schaduw.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Every hair casts its shadow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 4. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Geen regel zonder uitzondering.
    • There exists no rule without exceptions.
    • English equivalent: There is no rule without an exception.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1174. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Geen rook zonder vuur.
    • No smoke without fire.
    • Rumors are always, partially, based on facts.
    • Other meaning: There is a reason behind everything that happens.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 232. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Gemeen gerucht is zelden gelogen.
    • Common rumor seldom lies.
    • English equivalent: Common fame is often to blame.
    • A general disrepute is often true.
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 45. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 4 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 662. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Gemeene plaag rust wel.
    • English equivalent: A problem shared is a problem halved.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 351. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Geneesheer, genees u zelven!
    • English equivalent: Physician, heal yourself!
    • Don't correct other people's faults; correct your own faults instead.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1142. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Gezondheid is een grote schat.
    • English equivalent: Good health is above wealth.
    • "What shall it profit a man if he gains the whole world - and loses his health?"
    • Dale Carnegie, How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1948)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Geweld is geen recht.
    • English equivalent: Might is not always right.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1090. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • God behoede mij voor mijn vrienden, mijn vijenden neem ik zelf voor mijn rekening.
    • God save me from my friends; my enemies I can handle myself.
    • English equivalent: A mans worst enemies are often those of his own house.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 52. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • God schept geen mond, of hij schept er ook brood.
    • English equivalent: Each day brings it own bread.
    • Try not to worry so much about the future.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 757. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Goed begin, goed einde.
    • Translation and English equivalent: A good beginning makes a good ending.
    • "Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process."
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "40". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "190". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 185. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Goed verloren, niet verloren; moed verloren, veel verloren; eer verloren, meer verloren; ziel verloren, al verloren.
    • English equivalent: Courage lost, all lost.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 675. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Goede wijn behoeft geen krans.
    • Good wine needs no wreath.
    • Note: It was customary since early times to hang a grapevine, ivy or other greenery over the door of a tavern or way stop to advertise the availability of drink within.
    • English equivalent: Good wine needs no bush.
    • "A good product does not need advertising."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 109. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 211. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Goedkoop is duurkoop.
    • Cheaply bought is expensively bought.
    • English equivalent: If you buy cheaply you pay dearly.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 53. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Goed is goed, maar beter is beter.
    • English equivalent: Better is the enemy of good.
    • The aim for perfection or mastery might slow down progress.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 166. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Goed voorgaan doet goed volgen.
    • A good example will gain much following.
    • English equivalent: Lead by example.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 55. ISBN 0415160502. 

H[edit]

  • Haast je langzaam.
    • Hurry slowly.
    • Do your work slowly to make sure it gets thoroughly done.
    • English equivalent: More haste, less speed.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 113. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Herrenhulde is geen erve.
    • English equivalent: A king's favour is no inheritance.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 24. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Heden ik, morgen gij.
    • Today for me, and tomorrow for you.
    • English equivalent: Today me, tomorrow thee.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1038. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Het gebed opent's hemels deur.
    • English equivalent: Short prayers reach heaven.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 75. 
  • Het geluk helpt de dapperen.
    • English equivalent: Fortune favours the bold.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 38. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Het komt veel aan op de manier waarop men iets zegt.
  • Het middel is vaak erger dan de kwaal.
    • English equivalent: The remedy is often worse than the disease; Burn not your house to rid it off the mouse.
    • "Action taken to put something right is often more unpleasant or damaging than the original problem."
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 232. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. entry 646. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Het gelijke word door het gelijke genezen.
    • Like cures like.
    • English equivalent: Fight fire with fire.
    • "The best way to deal with an opponent is to fight back with similar weapons or tactics."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 87. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 688. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Het getij wacht op niemand.
    • English equivalent: Time and tide waits for no man.
    • "Take, for illustration, the case of the negligent and unreflecting man. He resolves to accomplish a certain important object at some future period; but in the intervening time, some preparatory, though in itself comparatively trifling business, is indispensable. He defers this business; [...] At length the period for accomplishing the ultimate object arrives: but, alas! the prerequisite, so absolutely connected and essential, is neglected And then, vain man!
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 169. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 723. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Het is goed, twee pijlen op zijn boog te hebben.
    • English equivalent: Good riding at two anchors, men have told, for if the one fails, the other may hold.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Het is niet alles goud wat er blinkt.
    • All that glistsers is not gold.
    • Outward appearance can be deceiving.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 77. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Het verstand komt met de jaren.
    • Sense comes with age.
    • English equivalent: Reason does not come before age.
    • Source: Blokhuis, Annie; van Kooten, Nel (2011). Je luistert wel, maar je hoort me niet: over communicatie met mensen met een verstandelijke beperking. Routledge. p. 60. ISBN 9044126377. 
  • Het zijn allemaal geen dieven daar de honden tegen blaffen.
    • English equivalent: All are not thieves that dogs bark at.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 77. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Het zijn slechte honden die hun eigen volk bijten.
    • Those are bad dogs who bite their own people.
    • English equivalent: Don't wash your dirty linen in public; It is an ill bird that fouls its own nest.
    • Don't speak in public of unpleasant private affairs; Don't speak ill of yourself and the groups you belong to.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 45. 
  • Het zijn sterke benen die de weelde kunnen dragen.
    • Legs that can carry wealth are strong.
    • English equivalent: Put a beggar on horseback and he'll ride it to death.
    • Newly rich people will waste their money.
    • Source: Hiligsmann, Philippe; Theissen, Siegfried (2008). Néerlandais - Expressions et proverbes: Intermédiaire-avancé. De Boeck Supérieur. p. 22. ISBN 2804159671. 
  • Hij is wel edel, die edele werken doet.
    • English equivalent: Handsome is that handsome does.
    • "People should be valued for their good deeds, not their good looks, also occasionally used of things, or as a warning not to be misled by an attractive appearance."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 113. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 39. ISBN 1417964677. 
  • Hoe meer zielen, hoe meer vreugd.
    • English equivalent: The more the merrier.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1094. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Hoe ouder, hoe zotter.
    • The older, the more foolish.
    • English equivalent: Wisdom goes not always by years.
    • Age will not refrain some people from acting foolish and imprudent.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 39. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Hoogmoed komt voor de val
    • Pride comes before fall.
    • Hiligsmann, Philippe; Theissen, Siegfried (1999). Uitdrukkingen en spreekwoorden van A tot Z. De Boeck Supérieur. p. 271. ISBN 2804131378. 

I[edit]

  • In twijfel, onthoud u.
    • English equivalent: When in doubt, leave it out.
    • "If you are unsure what to do, it is best to do nothing at all."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 296. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1223. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • In de wijn is de waarheid.
    • English equivalent: In wine there is truth.
    • Alcohol consumed removes the inhibition against telling the truth that occasionally one would like to keep secret.
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 272. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Indien gij iets doet, doe het dan goed.
    • English equivalent: If a job is worth doing, it is worth doing well.
    • "Too low they build who build beneath the stars."
    • Edward Young, Night Thoughts (1742-1745), Night VIII, line 225.
    • Runge, Martin (2000). Geriatrische Rehabilitation im Therapeutischen Team (2 ed.). Georg Thieme Verlag. p. 282. ISBN 3131023821. 

J[edit]

  • Je moet een gegeven paard niet in de mond kijken.
    • Don't look a given horse in the mouth.
    • English equivalent: Don't look a gift horse in the mouth.
    • Don't criticize gifts.
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 54. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Source: Hiligsmann, Philippe; Theissen, Siegfried (2008). Néerlandais - Expressions et proverbes: Intermédiaire-avancé. De Boeck Supérieur. p. 281. ISBN 2804159671. 

K[edit]

  • Kennis is macht.
    • Knowledge is power.
    • English equivalent: Learning is the eye of the mind.
    • Learning about a subject such as psychology will increase your overall competence.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 149. ISBN 0415160502. 

L[edit]

  • Niet te veel hooi op de vork nemen.
    • Don't lay too much hay on the fork.
    • English equivalent: Don't have too many irons in the fire.
    • Don't undertake too much work.
    • Afkari (2008). فرهنگاصطلاحات،هلندى-فارسى. Amsterdam University Press. p. 175. ISBN 908964007X. 
  • Laat geen kinderen vuiIe needen hooren, Want kleine potten hebben groote ooren .
  • Let op het ende.
    • In your every endeavor reflect the end.
    • English equivalent: Whatever you do, act wisely, and consider the end.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 600. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Leugens hebben korte benen.
    • A lie has short legs.
    • Hiligsmann, Philippe; Theissen, Siegfried (2008). Néerlandais - Expressions et proverbes: Intermédiaire-avancé. De Boeck Supérieur. p. 118. ISBN 2804159671. 

M[edit]

  • Man vangt meer vliegen met een' lepel stroop, dan met een vat azijn.
  • Men melkt de koe door den hals.
    • English equivalent: It is by the head that the cow gives the milk.
    • It is not enough to be industrious; so are the ants. What are you industrious about?
    • Henry David Thoreau, letter to Harrison Blake (16 November 1857).
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1039. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Men krijgt niets voor niets.
    • Men get nothing for nothing.
    • English equivalent: You don't get nothing for nothing; The only free cheese is in the mouse trap.
    • "Everything has to be paid for, directly or indirectly, in money or in kind."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 314. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1111. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Men moet de dag niet prijzen voor het avond is.
    • Don't praise the day until it is evening.
    • Don't celebrate until you are 100 % sure there is a reason to do so.
    • English equivalent: Don't count your chickens before they're hatched.
    • Source: Hiligsmann, Philippe; Theissen, Siegfried (2008). Néerlandais - Expressions et proverbes: Intermédiaire-avancé. De Boeck Supérieur. p. 89. ISBN 2804159671. 
  • Men moet niet de eiren onder een hen (kip) leggen.
    • English equivalent: Don't put all your eggs in the same basket.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 715. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Men moet de huid niet verkopen voordat de beer geschoten is.
    • Don't sell the fur until the bear has been shot.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 639. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Men moet het ijzer smeden als het heet is.
    • You have to forge while the iron is hot.
    • Source: Hiligsmann, Philippe; Theissen, Siegfried (2008). Néerlandais - Expressions et proverbes: Intermédiaire-avancé. De Boeck Supérieur. p. 90. ISBN 2804159671. 
  • Men moet niet het huis door de glazen gooien.
    • English equivalent: Don't burn the candles at both ends.
    • Don't wake up early in the morning and stay up late into the evening as well.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1137. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Met de maat, waarmee gij meet, zal u weder gemeten worden.
    • English equivalent: Whatever measure you deal out to others will be dealt back to you.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1219. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Met dieven vangt men dieven.
    • English equivalent: Set a thief to catch a thief.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 74. ISBN 1417964677. 
  • Met veel slagen valt de boom.
    • English equivalent: Little strokes fell great oaks.
    • A difficult task, e. g. removing a person/group from a strong position, or changing established ideas cannot be done quickly. It can be achieved gradually, by small steps, a little at a time.
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 252. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Met vuur spelen.
    • Playing with fire.
    • English equivalent: Do not play with edged tools.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 716. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Meet driemaal eer gij eens snijd.
    • English equivalent: Measure thrice, cut once.
    • One should always act only after due consideration. A hasty action may involve an improper consideration of important aspects.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 750. ISBN 0415096243. 
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 315. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

N[edit]

  • Niemand kan regter zijn in zijne eigen zaken.
    • English equivalent: No one can be the judge in his own case.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1038. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Niemand is onmisbaar.
    • English equivalent: No man is indispensable.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 319. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Niemand weet waar een ander de Schoen wringt.
    • English equivalent: No one knows where the shoe pinches, but he who wears it.
    • "Nobody can fully understand another person's hardship or suffering."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 289. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 4. 
  • Nieuwe bezems vegen schoon.
    • English equivalent: A new broom sweeps clean.
    • "We should never use an old tool when the extra labor in consequence costs more than a new one. Thousands wear out their lives and waste their time merely by the use of dull and unsuitable instruments."
    • "We often apply it to exchanges among servants, clerks, or any persons employed, whose service, at first, in any new place, is very good, both efficient and faithful; but very soon, when all the new circumstances have lost their novelty, and all their curiosity has ceased, they naturally fall into their former and habitual slackness."
    • Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 38. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 317. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Niet geschoten is altijd mis.
    • To never have shot is always a miss.
    • Middelkamp, Dekker (2000). Niet geschoten is altijd mis!: praktische handleiding voor promotie en verkoop in fitnesscentra. ProFITS. 

O[edit]

  • Ondank is 's werelds loon.
    • Ingratitude is the reward of the world.
    • Istendael, Geert; Istendael, J. (2007). Vlaamse sprookjes. Atlas. p. 32. 
  • Ongeluk komt te paard, en keert te voet.
    • English equivalent: Misfortune comes on horseback and goes away on foot.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 65. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Ongeluk komt zelden alleen.
    • English equivalent: Misery loves company.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 110. ISBN 0415160502. 

P[edit]

S[edit]

  • Schande over hem, die er kwaad van denkt.
    • English equivalent: Shame take him that shame thinketh.
    • Don't think evil of others since they most likely act the way they do because of situational factors: Never attribute a thing to malice which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. entry 806. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Schijn bedriegt.
    • Appearances deceive.
    • Things are not as they seem to be.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 232. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Schoenmaker, blijf bij je leest.
    • English equivalent: A shoemaker must not go beyond his laft.
    • "The moral Instruction of this Proverb, is, That Perfons, though skilful in their own Art, ought not meddle or make with Things out of their own Sphere, and not prefume to correct or amend what they do not underftand. The Proverb is only the Latin Ne futor ultra crepidam, in an Englifh Drefs; and firft took its Authority from a Story of the celebrated Painter Apelles, who having drawn a famous Piece, and expof’d it to publick View, a Cobler came by and found Fault with it, becaufe he made too few Latcbets to the Golofhoes: Apelles mends it accordingly, and fets it out again, and the next Day the Cobler coming again, finds Fault with the whole Leg; upon which Apelles comes out, faying, Cobler, go Home and keep to your Laft."
    • Source for meaning: Divers Proverbs, Nathan Bailey, 1721 [2]
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 185. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Stilstand is achteruitgang.
    • English equivalent: He who does not advance goes backwards.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 445. ISBN 0415096243. 

T[edit]

V[edit]

  • Van een vlieg een olifant maken.
    • English equivalent: Don't make a mountain out of a molehill.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 58. 
  • Van niets komt niets.
    • From nothing nothing can come.
    • If you do absolutely nothing, nothing will come to you.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 238. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Van twee kwalen moet men de ergste mijden.
    • From two deseases one should avoid the worst.
    • English equivalent: Of two evils choose the least.
    • "If you are forced to choose between two options, both of which are undesirable, all you can do is choose the one that is less undesirable than the other."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: {Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 42. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 3 August 2013. 
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 5. 
  • Verdeel en heers.
    • Divide and rule.
    • English equivalent: Divide and conquer.
    • "The best way to conquer or control a group of people is by encouraging them to fight among themselves rather than allowing them to unite in opposition to the ruling authority."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 57. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 13 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "823". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • Vertrouwen komt te voet en vertrekt te paard.
    • Trust arrives on foot and departs on horseback.
    • To trust someone takes time, but losing someone's trust happens quickly.
    • Becker, M. (1998). Bestuurlijke ethiek: een inleiding. Uitgeverij Van Gorcum. p. 136. ISBN 9023243641. 
  • Vier dingen laten zich niet verbergen: Vuur, schurft, hoest en liefde.
    • Four things does not let themselves hide: love, fire and love.
    • English equivalent: Love, smoke and cough are hard to hide.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. 50. 
  • Vroeg rijp, vroeg rot.
    • Premature mature, premature putrefied.
    • English equivalent: Early ripe, early rotten.
    • Precocious children will mean much trouble later on.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 758. ISBN 0415096243. 

W[edit]

  • Wanneer de sleutes is van goud, Waar is er dan een slot dat houdt.
  • Wat alleman zegt is waar.
    • English equivalent: What everybody says must be true.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 77. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Wat baten kaars en bril, als den uil niet zienen wil..
    • English equivalent: It takes two to tango.
    • '"The reason that there are so few good conversationalists is that most people are thinking about what they are going to say and not about what the others are saying."
    • François de La Rochefoucauld, Réflexions diverses, IV: De la conversation. (1731)
    • Source: Dedeurwaerder, Joris (2002). Professor Speleers: een biografie. Academia Press. p. 110. ISBN 9038202431. 
  • Wat in't gebeente gegroeid is, wil uit het vlees niet.
    • English equivalent: What is bred in the bone will not go out of the flesh.
    • "What is innate is not to be eradicated by force of education or self discipline: these may modify the outward manifestations of a man's nature, but not transmute the nature itself."
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 985. ISBN 0415096243. 
    • Source for meaning: Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. X. 
  • Wat men schrijft, dat blijft.
    • What one writes, stays.
    • English equivalent: Paper is forbearing.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1160. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Wie boter op zijn hoofd heeft, moet uit de zon blijven.
    • He who has butter on his head, should stay out of the sun.
    • English equivalent: He that hath a head of wax must not walk in the sun.
    • Know your limitations and weaknesses; Don't do something that is sure to damage you.
    • New York Folklore Quarterly. New York Folklore Society. 1950. p. 225. Retrieved on 29 September 2013. 
  • Wie dan leeft, wie dan zorgt.
    • Who lives then, worries then.
    • English equivalent: Don't cross your bridges until you reach them.
    • Focus on a problem the moment you are facing it, and not earlier.
    • Source: Poldermans, M.W.E. (2008). Wie dan leeft... wie dan zorgt?. Eburon Uitgeverij B.V.. pp. 338. ISBN 9059722507. 
  • Wie een hond wil slaan, kan gemakkelijk een stok vinden.
    • The one who wants to hit a dog can easily find a stick.
    • Someone who wants to be mean will find things to be mean about no matter what.
    • Source: Hiligsmann, Philippe; Theissen, Siegfried (2008). Néerlandais - Expressions et proverbes: Intermédiaire-avancé. De Boeck Supérieur. p. 84. ISBN 2804159671. 
  • Wie draagt er ergens slimmer schoenen dan een schoenmakersvrouw.
    • Who carries ever worst shoes than a shoemaker's wife?
    • English equivalent: The cobbler's wife is the worst shod.
    • "Working hard for others one may neglect one's own needs or the needs of those closest to him."
    • Source for proverbs and meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "7". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 65. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Wie een kuil graaft voor een ander, valt er zelf in.
    • The one who digs a hole for another, will fall in it himself.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 181. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Wie op twee hazen te gelijk jaagt, vangt geen van beide.
    • Who goes after two hares at the same time, will catch neither.
    • English equivalent: You must not run after two hares at the same time.
    • "Concentrate on one thing at a time or you will achieve nothing. - Trying to do two or more things at a time, when even one on its own needs full effort, means that none of them will be accomplished properly."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "X". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. X. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 102. 
  • Wie rijk wil worden, komt in verzoeking.
    • English equivalent: No one gets rich quickly if he is honest.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 963. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Wie zijn hersens niet gebruikt moet zijn benen gebruiken.
    • English equivalent: Who falls short in the head must be long in the heels.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "149". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 140. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Wie zijn eigen tuintje wiedt, ziet het onkruid van een ander niet.
    • He who tends to his own garden, does not see the weeds of his neighbors.
    • Source: Huijgen, Monique; Verburg, Marja (1987). basiswoordenboek van de Nederlandse taal. De Ruiter. p. 181. 

Z[edit]

  • Zachte heelmeesters maken stinkende wonden.
    • English equivalent: Mild physician, putrid wound.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 313. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Zeker is zeker.
    • English equivalent: He that leaves a certanity and sticks to chance, when fools pipe he msy dance.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 699. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Zelfs lief, niemands lief.
    • English equivalent: Don't blow your own horn.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 71. ISBN 1417964677. 
  • Zigt ons met wie dat gij verkeert, en heb ik uwen raad geleerd.
  • Zolang er leven is, is er hoop.
    • As long as there is life, there is hope.
    • Source: Hiligsmann, Philippe; Theissen, Siegfried (2008). Néerlandais - Expressions et proverbes: Intermédiaire-avancé. De Boeck Supérieur. p. 119. ISBN 2804159671. 
  • Zoals de ouden zongen, piepen de jongen.
    • As the old ones sing, so do the young ones chirp..
    • Source: Hiligsmann, Philippe; Theissen, Siegfried (1999). Uitdrukkingen en spreekwoorden van A tot Z. De Boeck Supérieur. p. 280. ISBN 2804131378. 
  • Zo vader, zo zoon.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • “Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.”
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1065. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Zulke moeder, zulke dochter.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • “Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.”
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 

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