Paul von Hindenburg

From Wikiquote
Jump to: navigation, search
A man who has seen three wars never will wish another war. He must be a friend of peace.

Paul von Hidenburg (2 October 1847 - 2 August 1934) was a Prussian-German field marshal, statesman, and politician.

Quotes[edit]

I am not a pacifist. That is not my attitude. But all my impressions of war are so bad that I could be for it only under the sternest necessity
  • Prosperity can come through peace alone. The German people are in favor of all possible means to make war impossible. I have seen three wars. A man who has seen three wars never will wish another war. He must be a friend of peace.
    But I am not a pacifist. All my impressions of war are so bad that I could be for it only under the sternest necessity — the necessity of fighting Bolshevism or of defending one's country.
  • Interview of 1929, as quoted in "Nations are greatly concerned over death of German President" in Berkeley Daily Gazette (1 August 1934)
    • Variant translation:
    • I am not a pacifist. That is not my attitude. But all my impressions of war are so bad that I could be for it only under the sternest necessity — the necessity of fighting Bolshevism or of defending one's country.
      • As quoted in TIME magazine (13 January 1930)
  • I have always been a Monarchist. In sentiment I still am. Now it is too late for me to change. But it is not for me to say that the new way is not the better way, the right way. So it may prove to be.
    • As quoted in TIME magazine (13 January 1930)
  • In the middle of August I did not consider that the time had come for us to despair of a successful conclusion of the war. In spite of certain distressing but isolated occurrences in the last battle, I certainly hoped that the Army would be in a position to continue to hold out. I fully realised what the homeland had already borne in the way of sacrifices and privations and what they would possibly still have to bear.
    • As quoted in The Great War: Sources and Evidence (1995) by David Stewart, James Fitzgerald and Alf Pickard, p. 269
  • In the Great War ledger, the page on which the Russian losses were written has been torn out. No one knows the figure. Five or eight Million?
    • As quoted in With Snow on Their Boots : The Tragic Odyssey of the Russian Expeditionary Force in France During World War I (1999) by Jamie H. Cockfield, p. 28
  • All we know is that, sometimes, in our battles with the Russians, we had to remove the mounds of enemy corpses from before our trenches, in order to get a clear field of fire against fresh assaulting waves.
    • The Great War: A Combat History of the First World War (2013) by Peter Hart, p. 242

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about: