Peace

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Blessed are the peacemakers; for they shall be called the children of God. ~ Yeshua (Jesus Christ)

Peace is an occurrence of harmony characterized by the lack of violence, conflict behaviors and the freedom from fear of violence. Commonly understood as the absence of hostility and retribution, peace also suggests sincere attempts at reconciliation, the existence of healthy or newly healed interpersonal or international relationships, prosperity in matters of social or economic welfare, the establishment of equality, and a working political order that serves the true interests of all.

See also World peace.

Quotes[edit]

Listed alphabetically by author
Where there is no justice there can be no secure peace. ~ Aung San Suu Kyi
Peace is never long preserved by weight of metal or by an armament race. Peace can be made tranquil and secure only by understanding and agreement fortified by sanctions. We must embrace international cooperation or international disintegration. ~ Bernard Baruch
Just laws which uphold human rights are the necessary foundation of peace. ~ Aung San Suu Kyi
If we are serious about peace, then we must work for it as ardently, seriously, continuously, carefully, and bravely as we have ever prepared for war. ~ Wendell Berry
The first peace, which is the most important, is that which comes within the souls of people when they realize their relationship, their oneness, with the universe and all its powers, and when they realize that at the center of the universe dwells Wakan-Tanka, and that this center is really everywhere, it is within each of us. ~ Black Elk
Better than a thousand hollow words
Is one word that brings peace.

Better than a thousand hollow verses
Is one verse that brings peace. ~ Gautama Buddha

As for me, I cease not to advocate peace. It may be on unjust terms, but even so it is more expedient than the justest of civil wars. ~ Cicero
World Peace can be achieved when the Power Of Love replaces the Love Of Power. ~ Sri Chinmoy
The strongest passions, and most dangerous weaknesses of the human breast; ambition, avarice, vanity, the honorable or venial love of fame, are all in conspiracy against the desire and duty of peace. ~ Alexander Hamilton
The pursuit of peace and progress, with its trials and errors, its successes and setbacks, can never be relaxed and never abandoned. ~ Dag Hammarskjöld
Abou Ben Adhem (may his tribe increase!)
Awoke one night from a deep dream of peace… ~ Leigh Hunt
Peace cannot be bullied into existence. ~ Ali Jarbawi
The happiness of mankind is best promoted by the useful pursuits of peace. ~ Thomas Jefferson
Let us now pledge all our efforts to obtain and consolidate the benefits of peace. ~ Benito Juárez
May the people and the government respect the rights of all. Between individuals, as between nations, peace means respect for the rights of others. ~ Benito Juárez
Smiling is very important. If we are not able to smile, then the world will not have peace. ~ Nhat Hanh
I do not want the peace that passeth understanding. I want the understanding which bringeth peace. ~ Helen Keller
If we all can persevere, if we can in every land and office look beyond our own shores and ambitions, then surely the age will dawn in which the strong are just and the weak secure and the peace preserved. ~ John F. Kennedy
While we shall never weary in the defense of freedom, neither shall we ever abandon the pursuit of peace. ~ John F. Kennedy
Genuine peace must be the product of many nations, the sum of many acts. It must be dynamic, not static, changing to meet the challenge of each new generation. For peace is a process — a way of solving problems. ~ John F. Kennedy
But peace does not rest in charters and covenants alone. It lies in the hearts and minds of all people. And if it is cast out there, then no act, no pact, no treaty, no organization can hope to preserve it without the support and the wholehearted commitment of all people. So let us not rest all our hopes on parchment and on paper; let us strive to build peace, a desire for peace, a willingness to work for peace, in the hearts and minds of all our people. ~ John F. Kennedy
All we are saying is give peace a chance. ~ John Lennon
Get out there and get peace. Think peace, live peace, and breathe peace and you'll get it as soon as you like. ~ John Lennon
What's so funny 'bout Peace, Love, and Understanding? ~ Nick Lowe
Peace hath her victories No less renowned than war. ~ John Milton
There is no way to peace; peace is the way. ~ A. J. Muste
There are only two powers in this world, the sword and the spirit ... in the long run the sword is always beaten by the spirit. ~ Napoleon I of France
Peace and love are ever in us, being and working; but we be not alway in peace and in love. ~ Julian of Norwich
Five enemies of peace inhabit with us — avarice, ambition, envy, anger, and pride; if these were to be banished, we should infallibly enjoy perpetual peace. ~ Petrarch
There is no true peace without fairness, truth, justice and solidarity. ~ Pope John Paul II
It isn't enough to talk about peace. One must believe in it. And it isn't enough to believe in it. One must work at it. ~ Eleanor Roosevelt
Until he extends the circle of his compassion to all living things, man will not himself find peace. ~ Albert Schweitzer
Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice. ~ Baruch Spinoza
If slavery, barbarism and desolation are to be called peace, men can have no worse misfortune. ~ Baruch Spinoza
In fact, the real disturbers of the peace are those who, in a free state, seek to curtail the liberty of judgment which they are unable to tyrannize over. ~ Baruch Spinoza
Let us pursue the things making for peace and the things that are upbuilding to one another. ~ Paul of Tarsus
It is not enough to yearn for peace. We must work, and if necessary, fight for it. ~ Harry S. Truman
If wars in the future are to be prevented the nations must be united in their determination to keep the peace under law. ~ Harry S. Truman
We must earn the peace we seek just as we earned victory in the war, not by wishful thinking but by realistic effort. ~ Harry S. Truman
Recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world. ~ Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Observe good faith and justice towards all Nations; cultivate peace and harmony with all. ~ George Washington
Let not thy peace depend on the tongues of men; for whether they judge well of thee or ill, thou art not on that account other than thyself. ~ Edward Garrett (Isabella Fyvie Mayo)
There is a price which is too great to pay for peace, and that price can be put in one word. One cannot pay the price of self-respect. ~ Woodrow Wilson
  • Peace at home, peace in the world.
    • Mustafa Kemal Atatürk , as quoted in many sources including, Atatürk (1963) by Uluğ İğdemir, p. 200; and Small Nations and Great Powers: A Study of Ethnopolitical Conflict in the Caucasus (2000) by Svante E. Cornell, p. 287; this later became the motto of the Republic of Turkey
  • The Universal Declaration of Human Rights recognizes that 'if man is not to be compelled to have recourse, as a last resort, to rebellion against tyranny and oppression', human rights should be protected by the rule of law. That just laws which uphold human rights are the necessary foundation of peace and security would be denied only by closed minds which interpret peace as the silence of all opposition and security as the assurance of their own power.
  • Behind the black portent of the new atomic age lies a hope which, seized upon with faith, can work out salvation ... Let us not deceive ourselves: we must elect world peace or world destruction.
    • Bernard Baruch, Address to the United Nations Atomic Energy Commission (14 June 1946)
  • Peace is never long preserved by weight of metal or by an armament race. Peace can be made tranquil and secure only by understanding and agreement fortified by sanctions. We must embrace international cooperation or international disintegration. Science has taught us how to put the atom to work. But to make it work for good instead of for evil lies in the domain dealing with the principles of human dignity. We are now facing a problem more of ethics than of physics.
    • Bernard Baruch, Address to the United Nations Atomic Energy Commission (14 June 1946)
  • If we are serious about peace, then we must work for it as ardently, seriously, continuously, carefully, and bravely as we have ever prepared for war.
  • The first peace, which is the most important, is that which comes from within the souls of men when they realize their relationship, their oneness, with the universe and all its powers, and when they realize that at the center of the universe dwells Wakan-Tanka, and that this center is really everywhere, it is within each of us. This is the real peace, and the others are but reflections of this. The second peace is that which is made between two individuals, and the third is that which is made between two nations. But above all you should understand that there can never be peace between nations until there is first known that true peace which is within the souls of men.
    • Black Elk in The Sacred Pipe: Black Elk's Account of the Seven Rites of the Oglala Sioux (1953)
  • Better than a thousand hollow words
    Is one word that brings peace.

    Better than a thousand hollow verses
    Is one verse that brings peace.

    Better than a hundred hollow lines
    Is one line of the law, bringing peace.

  • No matter what someone else has done, it still matters how we treat people. It matters to our humanity that we treat offenders according to standards that we recognize as just. Justice is not revenge — it's deciding for a solution that is oriented towards peace, peace being the harder but more human way of reacting to injury. That is the very basis of the idea of rights.
  • Peace is a resistance to the terrible satisfactions of war.
  • Equidem ad pacem hortari non desino; quae vel iniusta utilior est quam iustissimum bellum cum civibus.
    • As for me, I cease not to advocate peace. It may be on unjust terms, but even so it is more expedient than the justest of civil wars. (Translation by E.O. Winstedt)
    • Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum (Letters to Atticus) VII 14 (Latin and English) in the Loeb Classical Library, translated by E.O. Winstedt.
    • Popular but oversimplifying translations:
      • I never cease urging peace, which, however unfair, is better than the justest war in the world.
      • An unjust peace is better than a just war.
  • If you want to make peace, you don't talk to your friends. You talk to your enemies.
  • Peace without Justice is a low estate,—
    A coward cringing to an iron Fate!
    But Peace through Justice is the great ideal,—
    We'll pay the price of war to make it real.
  • Peace cannot be kept by force. It can only be achieved by understanding. You cannot subjugate a nation forcibly unless you wipe out every man, woman, and child. Unless you wish to use such drastic measures, you must find a way of settling your disputes without resort to arms.
    • Albert Einstein, in a speech to the New History Society (14 December 1930), reprinted in "Militant Pacifism" in Cosmic Religion (1931). Also found in The New Quotable Einstein by Alice Calaprice, p. 158.
  • There never was a good war, or a bad peace.
  • Peace is a practical positive policy, which must be attained by friendly co-operation between the nations, putting the good of all before the interests of each.
  • My books, they all have only one message: the heart's Power Of Love must replace the mind's Love Of Power. If I have the Power Of Love, then I shall claim the whole World as my own ... World Peace can be achieved when the Power Of Love replaces the Love Of Power.
    • If we are to reach real peace in this world and if we are to carry on a real war against war, we shall have to begin with children; and if they will grow up in their natural innocence, we won’t have to struggle, we won’t have to pass fruitless idle resolutions. But we shall go from love to love and peace to peace, until at last all the corners of the world are covered with that peace and love for which, consciously or unconsciously, the whole world is hungering.
    • Mahatma Gandhi Young India (19 November 1931, p. 361)
  • If in our daily life we can smile, if we can be peaceful and happy, not only we, but everyone will profit from it.'
  • Our work for peace must begin within the private world of each one of us. To build for man a world without fear, we must be without fear. To build a world of justice, we must be just. And how can we fight for liberty if we are not free in our own minds? How can we ask others to sacrifice if we are not ready to do so?... Only in true surrender to the interest of all can we reach that strength and independence, that unity of purpose, that equity of judgment which are necessary if we are to measure up to our duty to the future, as men of a generation to whom the chance was given to build in time a world of peace.
  • The pursuit of peace and progress cannot end in a few years in either victory or defeat. The pursuit of peace and progress, with its trials and its errors, its successes and its setbacks, can never be relaxed and never abandoned.
  • The situation of the world is still like this. People completely identify with one side, one ideology. To understand the suffering and the fear of a citizen of the Soviet Union, we have to become one with him or her. To do so is dangerous — we will be suspected by both sides. But if we don't do it, if we align ourselves with one side or the other, we will lose our chance to work for peace. Reconciliation is to understand both sides, to go to one side and describe the suffering being endured by the other side, and then to go to the other side and describe the suffering being endured by the first side. Doing only that will be a great help for peace.
    • Thich Nhat Hanh, Being Peace, 1987 edition, Parallax Press, Berkeley, CA.
  • Smiling is very important. If we are not able to smile, then the world will not have peace. It is not by going out for a demonstration against nuclear missiles that we can bring about peace. It is with our capacity of smiling, breathing, and being peace that we can make peace.
  • The only way to abolish war is to make peace heroic.
    • James Hinton, Philosophy and Religion: Selections from the Manuscripts of the Late James Hinton, ed. Caroline Haddon, (2nd ed., London: 1884), p. 267.
    • Widely misattributed on the internet to John Dewey, who actually attributes it to Hinton in Human Nature and Conduct: An Introduction to Social Psychology (New York: 1922), p. 115.
  • Abou Ben Adhem (may his tribe increase!)
    Awoke one night from a deep dream of peace
    ,
    And saw, within the moonlight in his room,
    Making it rich, and like a lily in bloom,
    An Angel writing in a book of gold
    • Leigh Hunt, in "Abou Ben Adhem" (or "Abou Ben Adhem and the Angel"), in The Poetical Works of Leigh Hunt (1846)
  • They shall beat their swords into ploughshares, and their spears into pruning-hooks: nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.
  • I maintain, then, that we should make peace, not only with the Chians, the Rhodians, the Byzantines and the Coans, but with all mankind...
    • Isocrates, "On the Peace", c. 355 B.C. In Isocrates, trans. George Norlin, Loeb Classical Library,1929.
  • Maybe tomorrow when He looks down
    Every green field and every town
    All of his children every nation
    There'll be peace and good, brotherhood…
    Crystal blue persuasion.
  • The Palestinians need an America that is just in its vision and in its demands. It is true that the Palestinians are the weaker party in terms of the balance of power, which makes it easy to pressure them. But peace cannot be bullied into existence.
    • Defining the Jewish State (6 March 2014) by Ali Jarbawi (a political scientist at Birzeit University and a former minister of the Palestinian Authority) in The New York Times's section The Opinion Pages: Contributing Op-Ed Writer with regard to the Peace process in the Israeli–Palestinian conflict; A version of this online op-ed appeared in print on March 7, 2014, in The International New York Times.
  • Believing that the happiness of mankind is best promoted by the useful pursuits of peace, that on these alone a stable prosperity can be founded, that the evils of war are great in their endurance, and have a long reckoning for ages to come, I have used my best endeavors to keep our country uncommitted in the troubles which afflict Europe, and which assail us on every side.
    • Thomas Jefferson, letter to the Young Republicans of Pittsburg (December 2, 1808), in H. A. Washington, ed., The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1871), vol. 8, p. 142.
  • Mexicans: let us now pledge all our efforts to obtain and consolidate the benefits of peace. Under its auspices, the protection of the laws and of the authorities will be sufficient for all the inhabitants of the Republic. May the people and the government respect the rights of all. Between individuals, as between nations, peace means respect for the rights of others.
    • Benito Juárez, as quoted in Global History, Volume Two : The Industrial Revolution to the Age of Globalization (2008) by Jerry Weiner, Mark Willner, George A. Hero and Bonnie-Anne Briggs, p. 175
  • I do not want the peace that passeth understanding. I want the understanding which bringeth peace.
    • Helen Keller, as quoted in Henry More: The Rational Theology of a Cambridge Plattonist (1962) by Aharon Lichtenstein
  • Peace is not solely a matter of military or technical problems--it is primarily a problem of politics and people. And unless man can match his strides in weaponry and technology with equal strides in social and political development, our great strength, like that of the dinosaur, will become incapable of proper control--and like the dinosaur vanish from the earth.
  • What kind of peace do we seek? Not a Pax Americana enforced on the world by American weapons of war. Not the peace of the grave or the security of the slave. I am talking about genuine peace, the kind of peace that makes life on earth worth living, the kind that enables men and nations to grow and to hope and to build a better life for their children — not merely peace for Americans but peace for all men and women — not merely peace in our time but peace for all time.
  • I speak of peace, therefore, as the necessary rational end of rational men. I realize that the pursuit of peace is not as dramatic as the pursuit of war—and frequently the words of the pursuer fall on deaf ears. But we have no more urgent task.
  • I do not deny the value of hopes and dreams but we merely invite discouragement and incredulity by making that our only and immediate goal. Let us focus instead on a more practical, more attainable peace— based not on a sudden revolution in human nature but on a gradual evolution in human institutions—on a series of concrete actions and effective agreements which are in the interest of all concerned. There is no single, simple key to this peace—no grand or magic formula to be adopted by one or two powers. Genuine peace must be the product of many nations, the sum of many acts. It must be dynamic, not static, changing to meet the challenge of each new generation. For peace is a process—a way of solving problems.
  • World peace, like community peace, does not require that each man love his neighbor—it requires only that they live together in mutual tolerance, submitting their disputes to a just and peaceful settlement.
  • Peace need not be impracticable, and war need not be inevitable. By defining our goal more clearly, by making it seem more manageable and less remote, we can help all peoples to see it, to draw hope from it, and to move irresistibly toward it.
  • Let us examine our attitude toward peace itself. Too many of us think it is impossible. Too many think it unreal. But that is a dangerous, defeatist belief. It leads to the conclusion that war is inevitable—that mankind is doomed—that we are gripped by forces we cannot control. We need not accept that view. Our problems are man made—therefore, they can be solved by man. And man can be as big as he wants. No problem of human destiny is beyond human beings.
  • The task of building the peace lies with the leaders of every nation, large and small. For the great powers have no monopoly on conflict or ambition. The cold war is not the only expression of tension in this world--and the nuclear race is not the only arms race. Even little wars are dangerous in a nuclear world. The long labor of peace is an undertaking for every nation--and in this effort none of us can remain unaligned. To this goal none can be uncommitted.
  • Chronic disputes which divert precious resources from the needs of the people or drain the energies of both sides serve the interests of no one--and the badge of responsibility in the modern world is a willingness to seek peaceful solutions.
  • But peace does not rest in charters and covenants alone. It lies in the hearts and minds of all people. And if it is cast out there, then no act, no pact, no treaty, no organization can hope to preserve it without the support and the wholehearted commitment of all people. So let us not rest all our hopes on parchment and on paper; let us strive to build peace, a desire for peace, a willingness to work for peace, in the hearts and minds of all our people.
  • True peace is not merely the absence of tension: it is the presence of justice.
  • We will not build a peaceful world by following a negative path. It is not enough to say "We must not wage war." It is necessary to love peace and sacrifice for it. We must concentrate not merely on the negative expulsion of war, but on the positive affirmation of peace. ... We must see that peace represents a sweeter music, a cosmic melody that is far superior to the discords of war. Somehow we must transform the dynamics of the world power struggle from the negative nuclear arms race which no one can win to a positive contest to harness man's creative genius for the purpose of making peace and prosperity a reality for all of the nations of the world. In short, we must shift the arms race into a "peace race". If we have the will and determination to mount such a peace offensive, we will unlock hitherto tightly sealed doors of hope and transform our imminent cosmic elegy into a psalm of creative fulfillment.
  • All we are saying is give peace a chance.
  • Remember love. The only hope for any of us is peace. Violence begets violence. If you want to get peace, you can get it as soon as you like if we all pull together. You're all geniuses and you're all beautiful. You don't need anybody to tell you who you are or what you are. You are what you are. Get out there and get peace. Think peace, live peace, and breathe peace and you'll get it as soon as you like. Okay?
    • John Lennon to the press in July 1969 after the release of the Plastic Ono Band's single "Give Peace a Chance", as quoted in The Beatles : An Oral History by David Pritchard and Alan Lysaght (1998), p. 285.
  • Imagine all the people living life in peace. You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one. I hope someday you'll join us, and the world will live as one.
  • We're trying to sell peace, like a product, you know, and sell it like people sell soap or soft drinks. And it's the only way to get people aware that peace is possible, and it isn't just inevitable to have violence. Not just war — all forms of violence. People just accept it and think 'Oh, they did it, or Harold Wilson did it, or Nixon did it,' they're always scapegoating people. And it isn't Nixon's fault. We're all responsible for everything that goes on, you know, we're all responsible for Biafra and Hitler and everything. So we're just saying "SELL PEACE" — anybody interested in peace just stick it in the window. It's simple but it lets somebody else know that you want peace too, because you feel alone if you're the only one thinking 'wouldn't it be nice if there was peace and nobody was getting killed.' So advertise yourself that you're for peace if you believe in it.
    • John Lennon, Interview on The David Frost Show (14 June 1969)
  • When we say "War is over if you want it," we mean that if everyone demanded peace instead of another TV set, we'd have peace.
  • Peace is not the absence of anything. Real peace is the presence of something beautiful. Both peace and the thirst for it have been in the heart of every human being in every century and every civilization.
    • Maharaji; Address to faculty, students and guests at Harvard University's Sanders Theater (August 2004).
  • To have peace and not war, the drift toward a war economy, as facilitated by the moves and the demands of the sophisticated conservatives, must be stopped; to have peace without slump, the tactics and policies of the practical right must be overcome. The political and economic power of both must be broken. The power of these giants of main drift is both economically and politically anchored; both unions and an independent labor party are needed to struggle effective.
  • The American elite does not have any real image of peace — other than as an uneasy interlude existing precariously by virtue of the balance of mutual fright. The only seriously accepted plan for peace is the full loaded pistol. In short, war or a high state of war-preparedness is felt to be the normal and seemingly permanent condition of the United States.
  • Peace hath her victories
    No less renowned than war.
  • There is no way to peace; peace is the way.
    • A. J. Muste, as quoted in The New York Times, (16 November 1967),
    • Variant: There is no way to peace, peace is the only way.
  • We cannot have peace if we are only concerned with peace. War is not an accident. It is the logical outcome of a certain way of life. If we want to attack war, we have to attack that way of life.
    Disarmament cannot be achieved nor can the problem of war be resolved without being accompanied by profound changes in the economic order and the structure of society.
    • A. J. Muste, as quoted in Our Generation Against Nuclear War (1983) by Dimitrios I. Roussopoulos, p. 430.
  • If they want peace, nations should avoid the pin-pricks that precede cannon shots.
  • Without peace, all other dreams vanish and are reduced to ashes.
    • Jawaharlal Nehru, Address to the United Nations (28 August 1954); as quoted in The Macmillan Dictionary of Political Quotations (1993) by Lewis D. Eigen and Jonathan Paul Siegel, p. 698
  • Do you know what I admire most in the world? The inability of force to organize anything. There are only two powers in this world, the sword and the spirit ... in the long run the sword is always beaten by the spirit.
    • Napoleon I of France, in an 1808 conversation with Louis-Marcelin de Fontanes, quoted in Madame de Staël et Napoléon (1903) by Henri Guillemin, p. 185, as translated in Dictatorship and Political Police: The Technique of Control by Fear (1945) by Ernest Kohn Bramsted
    • Variants:
    • Fontanes, do you know what I admire most in the world ? It is the powerlessness of force to organize anything. There are only two powers in the world, the sword and the mind .... In the long run the sword is always vanquished by the mind.
      • As quoted in "French Literature" by William Koren, in Modern Language Notes, Vol. XX, No. 3, (March 1905), p.97
    • The more I study the world, the more am I convinced of the inability of brute force to create anything durable.
      • As quoted by Charles Sumner, "War System of the Commonwealth of Nations" (1849), in The works of Charles Sumner (1870), Vol. 2, p. 224.
  • Defeatism about the feasibility of plans for disarmament and ordered peace has been the most calamitious of all the errors

made by democratic governments in modern times.

  • Peace and love are ever in us, being and working; but we be not always in peace and in love.
  • All that is contrary to love and peace is of the Fiend and of his part.
  • Peace is not merely the absence of visible conflict. Only a just peace based on the inherent rights and dignity of every individual can truly be lasting.
    • Barack Obama, Nobel Prize acceptance speech (9 December 2009)
  • Most anarchists believe the coming change can only come through a revolution, because the possessing class will not allow a peaceful change to take place; still we are willing to work for peace at any price, except at the price of liberty.
  • Five enemies of peace inhabit with us — avarice, ambition, envy, anger, and pride; if these were to be banished, we should infallibly enjoy perpetual peace.
    • Petrarch, De vita solitaria (1346) as quoted in Wisdom for the Soul: Five Millennia of Prescriptions for Spiritual Healing‎ (2006) by Larry Chang, p. 144
  • I, serial number 30743, Lieutenant General in reserves Yitzhak Rabin, a soldier in the Israeli Defense Forces and in the army of peace, I, who have sent armies into fire and soldiers to their death, say today: We sail onto a war which has no casualties, no wounded, no blood nor suffering. It is the only war which is a pleasure to participate in — the war for peace.
  • 'Cannot swords be turned to plowshares? Can we and all nations not live in peace? In our obsession with antagonisms of the moment, we often forget how much unites all the members of humanity. Perhaps we need some outside, universal threat to make us recognize this common bond. I occasionally think how quickly our differences worldwide would vanish if we were facing an alien threat from outside this world. And yet, I ask you, is not an alien force already among us? What could be more alien to the universal aspirations of our peoples than war and the threat of war?
    • Ronald Reagan, Address to United Nations General Assembly, (21 September 1987)
  • We wish peace, but we wish the peace of justice, the peace of righteousness. We wish it because we think it is right and not because we are afraid.
  • It isn't enough to talk about peace. One must believe in it. And it isn't enough to believe in it. One must work at it.
  • Until he extends the circle of his compassion to all living things, man will not himself find peace.
  • All these you may avoid but the Lie Direct; and you may avoid that too, with an If. I knew when seven justices could not take up a quarrel, but when the parties were met themselves, one of them thought but of an If, as, "If you said so then I said so"; and they shook hands and swore brothers. Your If is the only peace-maker; much virtue in If.
  • That it should hold companionship in peace
    With honour, as in war; since that to both
    It stands in like request.
  • A peace is of the nature of a conquest;
    For then both parties nobly are subdued,
    And neither party loser.
  • Of a commonwealth, whose subjects are but hindered by terror from taking arms, it should rather be said, that it is free from war, than that it has peace. For peace is not mere absence of war, but is a virtue that springs from force of character: for obedience is the constant will to execute what, by the general decree of the commonwealth, ought to be done. Besides that commonwealth, whose peace depends on the sluggishness of its subjects, that are led about like sheep, to learn but slavery, may more properly be called a desert than a commonwealth.
    • Baruch Spinoza, in Political Treatise (1677), Tractatus Politicus as translated by A. H. Gosset (1883), Ch. 5, Of the Best State of a Dominion - Alternate site (this is an unfinished work, left incomplete by Spinoza's death).
    • This might be paraphrased in a similar statement quoted in recent works, including A Natural History of Peace (1996) by Thomas Gregor, p. 4, there cited as being from Tractatus Theologico-Politicus (1670), but without citations as to chapter or translation used: Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice.
  • If slavery, barbarism and desolation are to be called peace, men can have no worse misfortune. No doubt there are usually more and sharper quarrels between parents and children, than between masters and slaves; yet it advances not the art of household management to change a father's right into a right of property, and count children but as slaves. Slavery, then, and not peace, is furthered by handing, over the whole authority to one man.
  • Schisms do not originate in a love of truth, which is a source of courtesy and gentleness, but rather in an inordinate desire for supremacy. From all these considerations it is clearer than the sun at noonday, that the true schismatics are those who condemn other men's writings, and seditiously stir up the quarrelsome masses against their authors, rather than those authors themselves, who generally write only for the learned, and appeal solely to reason. In fact, the real disturbers of the peace are those who, in a free state, seek to curtail the liberty of judgment which they are unable to tyrannize over.
  • So, then, let us pursue the things making for peace and the things that are upbuilding to one another.
  • A state of human life vaguely defined by the term "Universal Peace," while a result of cumulative effort through centuries past, might come into existence quickly, not unlike a crystal suddenly forms in a solution which has been slowly prepared. But just as no effect can precede its cause, so this state can never be brought on by any pact between nations, however solemn. Experience is made before the law is formulated, both are related like cause and effect. So long as we are clearly conscious of the expectation, that peace is to result from such a parliamentary decision, so long have we a conclusive evidence that we are not fit for peace. Only then when we shall feel that such international meetings are mere formal procedures, unnecessary except in so far as they might serve to give definite expression to a common desire, will peace be assured.
    To judge from current events we must be, as yet, very distant from that blissful goal. It is true that we are proceeding towards it rapidly. There are abundant signs of this progress everywhere. The race enmities and prejudices are decidedly waning.
    • Nikola Tesla, in "The Transmission of Electrical Energy without wires as a means for furthering Peace" in Electrical World and Engineer (7 January 1905).
  • It is not enough to yearn for peace. We must work, and if necessary, fight for it. The task of creating a sound international organization is complicated and difficult. Yet, without such organization, the rights of man on earth cannot be protected. Machinery for the just settlement of international differences must be found. Without such machinery, the entire world will have to remain an armed camp. The world will be doomed to deadly conflict, devoid of hope for real peace.
  • If wars in the future are to be prevented the nations must be united in their determination to keep the peace under law.'
    Nothing is more essential to the future peace of the world than continued cooperation of the nations which had to muster the force necessary to defeat the conspiracy of the Axis powers to dominate the world.
    While these great states have a special responsibility to enforce the peace, their responsibility is based upon the obligations resting upon all states, large and small, not to use force in international relations except in the defense of law.
    The responsibility of the great states is to serve and not to dominate the world.
  • I believe that we have learned the importance of maintaining military strength as a means of preventing war. We have found that a sound military system is necessary in time of peace if we are to remain at peace. Aggressors in the past, relying on our apparent lack of military force, have unwisely precipitated war. Although they have been led to destruction by their misconception of our strength, we have paid a terrible price for our unpreparedness.
  • The recommendations I have made represent the most urgent steps toward securing the peace and preventing war. We must be ready to take every wise and necessary step to carry out this great purpose. This will require assistance to other nations. It will require an adequate and balanced military strength. We must be prepared to pay the price for peace, or assuredly we shall pay the price of war. We in the United States remain determined to seek peace by every possible means, a just and honorable basis for the settlement of international issues.
  • The United States has a tremendous responsibility to act according to the measure of our power for good in the world. We have learned that we must earn the peace we seek just as we earned victory in the war, not by wishful thinking but by realistic effort. At no time in our history has unity among our people been so vital as it is at the present time. Unity of purpose, unity of effort, and unity of spirit are essential to accomplish the task before us.
  • Peace will come wherever it is sincerely invited.
    • Alice Walker in Living by the word: selected writings, 1973-1987, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 192, (1989).
  • To be prepared for war is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace.
    • George Washington, First Annual Address to both Houses of Congress (8 January 1790).
  • Observe good faith and justice towards all Nations; cultivate peace and harmony with all.
  • From time immemorial, people have talked about peace without achieving it. Do we simply lack enough experience? Though we talk peace, we wage war. Sometimes we even wage war in the name of peace. . . . War may be too much a part of history to be eliminated—ever.
  • Codification and mechanisms do not sufficiently ensure the right to peace. What is crucial is to develop a true culture of peace. This requires education for peace. Everyone – not only children – should be educated in compromise, cooperation, empathy, solidarity, compassion, restoration and reconciliation. In short, we must learn respect for others and how to live in harmony, even if we agree to disagree. Negotiation and mediation skills must be taught so as to prevent breaches of the peace and other forms of violence. A philosophical paradigm change is necessary, so that we are not caught in the old mind-set, in the prevailing culture of violence, the logic of war, aggressive attitudes, practices of economic exploitation and cultural imperialism.

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations[edit]

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 588-91.
  • This hand, to tyrants ever sworn the foe,
    For freedom only deals the deadly blow;
    Then sheathes in calm repose the vengeful blade,
    For gentle peace in freedom's hallowed shade.
  • The fiercest agonies have shortest reign;
    And after dreams of horror, comes again
    The welcome morning with its rays of peace.
  • The trenchant blade Toledo trusty,
    For want of fighting was grown rusty,
    And ate into itself for lack
    Of somebody to hew and hack.
  • Mark! where his carnage and his conquests cease,
    He makes a solitude and calls it—peace!
    • Lord Byron, Bride of Abydos, Canto II, Stanza 20.
  • Cedant arma togæ.
    • War leads to peace.
    • Cicero, De Officiis (44 B.C.), I. 22.
  • Mihi enim omnis pax cum civibus bello civili utilior videbatur.
    • For to me every sort of peace with the citizens seemed to be of more service than civil war.
    • Cicero, Philippics, 2. 15. 37.
  • Iniquissimam pacem justissimo bello antefero.
    • I prefer the most unfair peace to the most righteous war.
    • Adapted from Cicero. Same idea used by Butler in the Rump Parliament. See also Cicero, Epistola ad Atticum. 7. 14. Also said by Benjamin Franklin, letter to Quincey. Sept. 11, 1773. Bishop Colet, St. Paul's, London, 1512. See Green's History of the English People, The New Learning.
  • Mars gravior sub pace latet.
    • A severe war lurks under the show of peace.
    • Claudianus, De Sexto Consulatu Honorii Augusti Panegyris, 307.
  • Nec sidera pacem
    Semper habent.
    • Nor is heaven always at peace.
    • Claudianus, De Bello Getico, LXII.
  • The gentleman [Josiah Quincy] cannot have forgotten his own sentiment, uttered even on the floor of this House, "Peaceably if we can, forcibly if we must."
  • Peace rules the day, where reason rules the mind.
  • O for a lodge in some vast wilderness,
    Some boundless contiguity of shade;
    Where rumor of oppression and deceit,
    Of unsuccessful or successful war,
    Might never reach me more.
  • Though peace be made, yet it's interest that keeps peace.
    • Quoted by Oliver Cromwell, in Parliament (Sept. 4, 1654), as "a maxim not to be despised".
  • Such subtle covenants shall be made,
    Till peace itself is war in masquerade.
    • John Dryden, Absalom and Achitopel, Part I, line 752; Part II, line 268.
  • At home the hateful names of parties cease,
    And factious souls are wearied into peace.
  • Nothing can bring you peace but yourself. Nothing can bring you peace but the triumph of principles.
  • Breathe soft, ye winds! ye waves, in silence sleep!
    • John Gay, To a Lady, Epistle I, line 17.
  • Pax vobiscum.
    • Peace be with you.
    • Vulgate, Genesis. XLIII. 23.
  • Let us have peace.
  • I accept your nomination in the confident trust that the masses of our countrymen, North and South, are eager to clasp hands across the bloody chasm which has so long divided them.
    • Horace Greeley, accepting the Liberal Republican nomination for President (May 20, 1872).
  • But—a stirring thrills the air
    Like to sounds of joyance there,
    * That the rages
    • Of the ages
      Shall be cancelled, and deliverance offered from the darts that were,
      Consciousness the Will informing, till it fashion all things fair.
    • Thomas Hardy, Dynasts, Semichorus I of the Years.
  • So peaceful shalt thou end thy blissful days,
    And steal thyself from life by slow decays.
    • Homer, The Odyssey, Book XI, line 164. Pope's translation.
  • In pace ut sapiens aptarit idonea bello.
    • Like as a wise man in time of peace prepares for war.
    • Horace, Satires, II. 2. 111.
  • They shall beat their swords into ploughshares, and their spears into pruning-hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation neither shall they learn war any more.
    • Isaiah, II. 4. Joel, III. 10. Micah, IV. 3.
  • The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid.
    • Isaiah, XI. 6.
  • We love peace as we abhor pusillanimity; but not peace at any price. There is a peace more destructive of the manhood of living man than war is destructive of his material body. Chains are worse than bayonets.
  • It is thus that mutual cowardice keeps us in peace. Were one-half of mankind brave and one-half cowards, the brave would be always beating the cowards. Were all brave, they would lead a very uneasy life; all would be continually fighting; but being all cowards, we go on very well.
  • Sævis inter se convenit ursis.
    • Savage bears keep at peace with one another.
    • Juvenal, Satires, XV. 164.
  • The days of peace and slumberous calm are fled.
  • Paix à tout prix.
    • Peace at any price.
    • Lamartine, as quoted by A. H. Clough in Letters and Remains. (Ed. 1865), p. 105. Le Ministère de la Paix à tout prix. Armand Carrel in the National, March 13, 1831. (Of the Perier ministry).
  • Peace will come soon and come to stay, and so come as to be worth keeping in all future time. It will then have been proved that among free men there can be no successful appeal from the ballot to the bullet, and that they who take such appeal are sure to lose their cases and pay the cost.
    • Abraham Lincoln, quoted by E. J. Young, The Lesson of the Hour, in Magazine of History, No. 43. (Extra number).
  • Peace! and no longer from its brazen portals
    The blast of War's great organ shakes the skies!
    But beautiful as songs of the immortals,
    The holy melodies of love arise.
  • Buried was the bloody hatchet;
    Buried was the dreadful war-club;
    Buried were all warlike weapons,
    And the war-cry was forgotten.
    Then was peace among the nations.
  • Ef you want peace, the thing you've gut to du
    Is jes' to show you're up to fightin', tu.
  • Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.
    • Luke, II. 14.
  • Pax huic domui.
    • Peace be to this house.
    • Luke. X. 5; Matthew. X. 12. (Vulgate).
  • In the inglorious arts of peace.
  • Peace hath her victories,
    No less renowned than war.
  • I knew by the smoke that so gracefully curled
    Above the green elms, that a cottage was near,
    And I said, "If there's peace to be found in the world,
    A heart that was humble might hope for it here."
  • How calm, how beautiful comes on
    The stilly hour, when storms are gone.
    • Thomas Moore, Lalla Rookh (1817), The Fire Worshippers, Part III, Stanza 7.
  • L'empire, c'est la paix.
    • The Empire means peace.
    • Louis Napoleon, speech to the Chamber of Commerce in Toulouse (Oct. 9, 1852). See B. Jerrold's Life of Louis Napoleon. "L'empire, c'est l'epée." Parody of same in Kladderdatsch, Nov. 8, 1862.
  • Would you end war?
    Create great Peace.
  • For peace do not hope; to be just you must break it.
    Still work for the minute and not for the year.
  • Candida pax homines, trux decet ira feras.
    • Fair peace becomes men; ferocious anger belongs to beasts.
    • Ovid, Ars Amatoria, III. 502.
  • His helmet now shall make a hive for bees,
    And lover's sonnets turn'd to holy psalms;
    A man at arms must now serve on his knees,
    And feed on prayers, which are his age's alms.
  • An equal doom clipp'd Time's blest wings of peace.
    • Petrarch, To Laura in Death, Sonnet XLVIII, line 18.
  • Allay the ferment prevailing in America by removing the obnoxious hostile cause—obnoxious and unserviceable—for their merit can only be in action. "Non dimicare et vincare."
  • Concession comes with better grace and more salutary effect from superior power.
  • The peace of God, which passeth all understanding.
    • Philippians, IV. 7.
  • Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace.
    • Proverbs, III. 17.
  • Mercy and truth are met together: righteousness and peace have kissed each other.
    • Psalms. LXXXV. 10.
  • Peace be within thy walls, and prosperity within thy palaces.
    • Psalms. CXXII. 7.
  • When every young man refuses to go to war, you will have peace. As long as you fight for gain and greed, there will be no peace. As long as one person commits acts of violence for the sake of peace, you will have war. Unfortunately it is difficult to imagine that all the young men in all of the countries will refuse to go to war at the same time. And so you must work out what violence has wrought. Within the next hundred years, that time may come. Remember, you do not defend any idea with violence. There is no man who hates but that hatred is reflected outward and made physical. And there is no man who loves but that love is reflected outward and made physical.
  • People are always expecting to get peace in heaven: but you know whatever peace they get there will be ready-made. Whatever making of peace they can be blest for, must be on the earth here.
  • If peace cannot be maintained with honor, it is no longer peace.
  • Es kann der Frömmste nicht im Frieden bleiben,
    Wenn es dem bösen Nachbar nicht gefällt.
    • The most pious may not live in peace, if it does not please his wicked neighbor.
    • Friedrich Schiller, Wilhelm Tell, IV. 3. 124.
  • And for the peace of you I hold such strife
    As 'twixt a miser and his wealth is found.
  • When it is peace, then we may view again
    With new-won eyes each other's truer form
    And wonder. Grown more loving-kind and warm
    We'll grasp firm hands and laugh at the old pain
    When it is peace. But until peace, the storm
    The darkness and the thunder and the rain.
  • Let the bugles sound the Truce of God to the whole world forever.
  • In this surrender—if such it may be called—the National Government does not even stoop to conquer. It simply lifts itself to the height of its original principle. The early efforts of its best negotiators, the patriotic trial of its soldiers … may at last prevail.
    • Charles Sumner, sustaining President Lincoln in the U.S. Senate, in the Trent Affair. Jan. 7, 1862.
  • Auferre, trucidare, rapere, falsis nominibus imperium, atque, ubi solitudinem faciunt, pacem appellant.
    • To rob, to ravage, to murder, in their imposing language, are the arts of civil policy. When they have made the world a solitude, they call it peace.
    • Tacitus, Agricola, XXX. Ascribing the speech to Galgacus, Britain's leader against the Romans.
  • Miseram pacem vel bello bene mutari.
    • A peace may be so wretched as not to be ill exchanged for war.
    • Tacitus, Annales (AD 117), III. 44.
  • Bellum magis desierat, quam pax cœperat.
    • It was rather a cessation of war than a beginning of peace.
    • Tacitus, Annales (AD 117), IV. 1.
  • Peace the offspring is of Power.
  • No more shall * * * Peace
    Pipe on her pastoral hillock a languid note,
    And watch her harvest ripen.
  • Peace with honor.
    • Theobald, Count of Champagne, letter to King Louis the Great. (1108–1137). See Walter Map, De Nugis Curialium (Ed. Camden Society, p. 220.) Sir Kenelm Digby, letter to Lord Bristol, May 27, 1625. See his Life, pub. by Longmans. Same in Coriolanus, III, II.
  • Si vis pacem, para bellum.
    • In time of peace prepare for war.
    • Original not found, but probably suggested by "qui desiderat pacem, præparet bellum." He who desires peace will prepare for war. Vegetius—Epitoma Rei Militaris. Lib. III. End of Prolog. A similar thought also in Dion Chrysostom. Livy. VI. 18. 7. Cornelius Nepos—Epaminondas. V. Statius—Thebais. VII. 554. Syrus—Maxims. 465.
  • He had rather spend £100,000 on Embassies to keep or procure peace with dishonour, than £100,000 on an army that would have forced peace with honour.
    • Sir Anthony Weldon, The Court and Character of King James, p. 185. (1650). Used by Disraeli on his return from the Berlin Congress on the Eastern Question, July, 1878.
  • But dream not helm and harness
    The sign of valor true;
    Peace hath higher tests of manhood
    Than battle ever knew.
  • As on the Sea of Galilee,
    The Christ is whispering "Peace."
  • When earth as if on evil dreams
    Looks back upon her wars,
    And the white light of Christ outstreams
    From the red disc of Mars,
    His fame, who led the stormy van
    Of battle, well may cease;
    But never that which crowns the man
    Whose victory was peace.
  • The example of America must be the example not merely of peace because it will not fight, but of peace because peace is the healing and elevating influence of the world, and strife is not. There is such a thing as a man being too proud to fight. There is such a thing as a nation being so right that it does not need to convince others by force that it is right.
    • Woodrow Wilson, address in Convention Hall, Philadelphia (May 10, 1915).
  • Ne'er to meet, or ne'er to part, is peace.
    • Edward Young, Night Thoughts (1742-1745), Night V, line 1,058.

Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895)[edit]

Quotes reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895).

  • Two sorts of peace are more to be dreaded than all the troubles in the world — peace with sin, and peace in sin.
  • We shall never be at peace with ourselves until we yield with glad supremacy to our higher faculties.
  • I could not live in peace if I put the shadow of a willful sin between myself and God.
  • How different the peace of God from that of the world! It calms the passions, preserves the purity of the conscience, is inseparable from righteousness, unites us to God and strengthens us against temptations. The peace of the soul consists in an absolute resignation to the will of God.
  • Let not thy peace depend on the tongues of men; for whether they judge well of thee or ill, thou art not on that account other than thyself. Where are true peace and true glory? Are they not in God?
  • When Christ was about to leave the world, He made His will. His soul He committed to His father; His body He bequeathed to Joseph to be decently interred; His clothes fell to the soldiers; His mother He left to the care of John; but what should He leave to His poor disciples that had left all for Him? Silver and gold He had none; but He left them that which was infinitely better, His peace.
  • There have been keen agonies, sore heart-aches, but they have been short, and a sweet peace abides. Can it be His peace? Is it possible that to such a weak, sinful creature as I, the Comforter has indeed come? I must believe this, and that it is His presence that cheers me.
  • After love comes peace. A great many people are trying to make peace. But that has already been done. God has not left it for us to do; all that we have to do is to enter into it.
  • The promise is: "Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace whose mind is stayed on Thee." Now, as long as our minds are stayed on our dear selves, we shall never have peace.


  • You may assuredly find perfect peace, if you are resolved to do that which your Lord has plainly required,— and content that He should indeed require no more of you,— than to do justice, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with Him.

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