Purity

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Purity is the state or degree of being pure, lacking contaminants or impediments to virtue.

Quotes[edit]

  • Quell' onda, che ruina
    Dalla pendice alpina,
    Balza, si frange, e mormora
    Ma limpida si fa.
    • That water which falls from some Alpine height is dashed, broken, and will murmur loudly, but grows limpid by its fall.
    • Metastasio, Alcide al Bivio (1760).
  • Qual diverrà quel fiume,
    Nel lungo suo cammino,
    Se al fonte ancor vicino
    É torbido così?
    • What will the stream become in its lengthened course, if it be so turbid at its source?
    • Metastasio, Morte d' Abele (1732), I.
  • The gentleman knows that whatever is imperfect and unrefined does not deserve praise. ... He makes his eyes not want to see what is not tight, makes his ears not want to hear that is not right, makes his mouth not want to speak what is not right, and makes his heart not want to deliberate over what is not right. ... For this reason, power and profit cannot sway him, the masses cannot shift him, and nothing in the world can shake him.
    • Xun Zi, “An Exhortation to Learning,” E. Hutton, trans., Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy (2001), p. 260

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations[edit]

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 652.
  • Les choses valent toujours mieux dans leur source.
    • The stream is always purer at its source.
    • Blaise Pascal, Lettres Provinciales, IV.
  • Unto the pure all things are pure.

External links[edit]

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