Karma

From Wikiquote
Jump to: navigation, search
Jainism: An interconnected motif and knots symbolizing karma and the link between all lives in a Jain temple.
Bodhidharma:To go from mortal to Buddha, you have to put an end to karma, nurture your awareness, and accept what life brings.
Buddhism:What kind of life a person is reborn into depends on Karma. Karma refers to all the deeds, words, and thoughts of one’s life. Buddhists believe karma is the deciding factor in one's fate in his or her next life. Therefore,a person who led a life self centeredness and selfishness may be reborn as a rat.
Jainism:Jivas (souls) are either caught by karma (action) in the world of reincarnation (samsara) or liberated (mukta) and perfected (siddha).
Nicholas Eldridge:Samsara is the belief that we are stuck in a karmic wheel of suffering and, until we realize our full spiritual potential, we keep returning to learn and understand our ultimate being. Karma plays a huge part in this belief because it is your Karma that decides whether you evolve or devolve at your next birth, Samsara is symbolized as the endless knot.

Karma (Sanskrit: कर्म; IPA: [ˈkarmə] ( listen); Pali: kamma) means action, work or deed; it also refers to the principle of causality where intent and actions of an individual influence the future of that individual. Good intent and good deeds contribute to good karma and future happiness, while bad intent and bad deeds contribute to bad karma and future suffering. With origins in ancient India, it is a key concept in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Taoism, Shintoism, Ching Hai and others.


Alphabetized by author or source
A · B · C · D · E · F · G · H · I · J · K · L · M · N · O · P · Q · R · S · T · U · V · W · X · Y · Z · Anon · External links

A[edit]

  • Whatever karma a soul has acquired through its own prior needs,
    it will obtain the good and bad results thereof.
    If one can obtain results from the deeds of others,
    then surely his own deeds would be meaningless.
    Except for karma earned for oneself by oneself,
    no one gives anything to anyone.
    Reflecting upon this fact, therefore,
    let every person unwaveringly,
    abandon the perverse notion that
    another being can provide him with anything at all.
  • This emphasis on reaping the fruits only of one's own karma was not restricted to the Jainas; both Hindus and Buddhist writers have produced doctrinal materials stressing the same point. Each of the latter traditions, however, developed practices in basic contradiction to such belief. In addition to shraddha (the ritual Hindu offerings by the son of deceased), we find among Hindus widespread adherence to the notion of divine intervention in ones fate, while Buddhists eventually came to propound such theories like boon-granting Bodhisattvas, transfer of merit and like. Only Jainas have been absolutely unwilling to allow such ideas to penetrate their community, despite the fact that there must have been tremendous amount of social pressure on them to do so
    • Acaraya Amitagatis saying summarized by Padmanabh S. Jaini, in "Collected Papers on Jaina Studies", p.136

B[edit]

  • Karma brings us ever back to rebirth, binds us to the wheel of births and deaths. Good Karma drags us back as relentlessly as bad, and the chain which is wrought out of our virtues holds as firmly and as closely as that forged from our vices.
  • The Gita uses the word ‘karma’ (action) in the sense of swadharma. We eat, drink, sleep; these are all actions. But these are not the actions that the Gita refers to when it talks of karma. Karma refers to the performance of swadharma. But in order to attain desirelessness through such karma, an important aid is necessary. One must overcome desire, attachment and anger. One cannot have desirelessness unless and until the mind has become pure and calm like the waters of the Ganga. The actions necessary for the purification of mind are called vikarma by the Gita. Karma, vikarma and akarma—these three terms are important... Karma means the outward actions done in the pursuit of swadharma. Vikarma means total involvement of the mind therein.
  • Karma is very much needed to enable us to understand the state of our minds. We can remove our defects only when we become aware of them. If we are not aware of them, all efforts for progress and growth will come to naught. It is while doing work that we become aware of our defects. Vikarma is then to be employed to get rid of those defects. With ceaseless application of vikarma inwardly, we will gradually come to know how to remain detached while performing swadharma, how to remain beyond desires and passions, anger, greed, temptations and delusions. When there is a constant endeavour to purify karma, pure karma will follow naturally and effortlessly.
  • What kind of life a person is reborn into depends on Karma. Karma refers to all the deeds, words, and thoughts of one’s life. Buddhists believe karma is the deciding factor in one's fate in his or her next life. Therefore,a person who led a life self centeredness and selfishness may be reborn as a rat.
  • Karma [represents] intentional actions that affect one’s circumstances in this and future lives. The Buddha’s insistence that the effect depends on volition marks the Buddhist treatment of karma as different from the Hindu understanding of karma.
  • Buddhists believe that the rebirths that arise are a result of the karma we have. Karma is the idea that every action has a reaction. If people do good then good will follow. If people choose to do evil, then evil will follow or as s you sow so will you reap. The results of the karma can be experienced in the present lifetime, even day by day.
    • In "Buddhism", p.17
  • In Buddhism, karma can go from one life time to another and therefore it is vital that people try to live the best life they can, as they will often have the bad karma of previous lifetimes to deal with. Karma will determine whether people reach enlightenment or have to live 1000 lifetimes of a lesser animal in order to get to the truth.
    • In "Buddhism", p.17
  • Karma just does not work for individuals but can also have an effect on the whole nation or the whole planet. Buddhists talk about collective karma, when the consequences of action taken by whole countries can often change things. For example, Buddhists would argue that the way rich nations treat the poor nations of the world may well affect the karma of a whole country or a group a such as the United Nations.
    • In "Buddhism", p.17

C[edit]

  • A man is born alone and dies alone; and he experiences the good and bad consequences of his karma alone; and he goes alone to hell or the Supreme abode.

D[edit]

E[edit]

Nicholas Eldridge:...Samsara is symbolized as the endless knot.

F[edit]

G[edit]

  • If thou deemest that (the path of) understanding is more excellent than (the path of) action, O, Janaradhna (w:Krishna|Krishna]]), when dost thou urge me to do this savage deed, O, Kesava, Krisna?

H[edit]

The Supreme Master Ching Hai: Only by spiritual practice can we break through our karma and the effects of the causes we have made. Only then can we escape from them. It matters not whether you have acquired any merit.
  • Only by spiritual practice can we break through our karma and the effects of the causes we have made. Only then can we escape from them. It matters not whether you have acquired any merit. Merit is merit. Karma is karma. Nonetheless, if one practices the Quan Yin Method, one can be liberated regardless of having any merit or not. It is so logical, so scientific.
  • John phoned me up one morning in January and said, "I've written this tune and I'm going to record it tonight and have it pressed up and out tomorrow — that's the whole point: Instant Karma", you know." So I was in. I said, "OK, I'll see you in town." I was in town with Phil Spector and I said to Phil, "Why don't you come to the session?" There were just four people: John played piano, I played acoustic guitar, there was Klaus Voormann on bass, and Alan White on drums. We recorded the song and brought it out that week, mixed — instantly — by Phil Spector.
  • Karma has two unique attributes: first in quantity and quality it provides for like-for-like (i.e good for good, bad for bad, more for more, less for less), Second the fruits of one’s actions are non-transferable. We enjoy the fruits of our good actions and suffer the consequences of bad actions in this life or future life.
    • In Hinduism quoted in "Explore Hinduism", p.77
Hinduism:...The Upanishad says ’You are what you desire is. As is your desire so is your deed. As is your deed is so is your destiny.' Because of karma, one is reborn again and again until the effects of all accumulated karma are dissipated and one reaches ‘the other shore’ moksha...
  • Since the karmic time is cyclic, karma works through many lives. What we are suffering (or enjoying) now at least in part due to the consequences of what we have done in the past lives. The Upanishad says ’You are what you desire is. As is your desire so is your deed. As is your deed is so is your destiny.' Because of karma, one is reborn again and again until the effects of all accumulated karma are dissipated and one reaches ‘the other shore’ moksha. When the physical body is annihilated by death, the Karmic seeds remain embedded in the subtle body and determine the course of future life.
    • In Hinduism quoted in "Explore Hinduism", pp.77-78
  • Hindus view the Law of Karma as a divine law, without which cosmic justice is neither achievable, nor imaginable.
    • In Hinduism quoted in "Explore Hinduism",P. 78-79
  • The Vedic seers discovered the Law of Karma over eight thousand years ago and immortalized in the Vedas.
    • In Hinduism quoted in "Explore Hinduism",P.79
  • The past karma of an individual consists of two parts, prarabdha karma and [[w:Sanchita karma|sanchita karma. The prarabdha karma is the part of one’s past karma which is to bear fruit in the present life of the individual. The sanchita karma is the accumulated karma of the previous births, which is to bear fruits in the future. The karma, which is being done now will produce results in the future and is called the agami karma (other names are kriyamana karma and vartamana karma). In Hindu tradition these karmas are compared to an archer and a bow. The arrows that have been shot by the archer, which are already on their way to the target and the archer has no control over them are akin to prarabdha karma. The arrows he is about to shoot are akin to the agami karma and the arrows lying in his quiver are akin to the sanchit karma. This illustrates the Hindu view that one has no control over prarabdha karma, but full control over sanchit and agami karmas.
    • In Hinduism quoted in "Explore Hinduism",P.74
  • You and I have been physically given two hands and two legs and half-decent brains. Some people have not been born like that for a reason. The karma is working from another lifetime.

I[edit]

J[edit]

  • In Jainism, this term has two meanings. 1)Action or activity in the sense of karma-bhumi lands and karmans. 2) a type of extremely subtle matter (pudgala) that is attracted to the soul (jiva) by actions of body, speech and mind. It is bound with the soul whenever actions are motivated by passions (Kasayas).
  • Most Indian systems employ the term karma to designate certain traces (vasanas) or seeds (bija) left behind, as it were by one’s deeds. These residual factors will someday bear fruit in the sense of generating or conditioning experience; thus it is said : Every action must eventuate in an appropriate reward or retribution to the performer of that action. Jainas adhere to the general outlines of this view. But they stand alone in asserting unequivocally that karma is itself actual matter, rather than the sort of quasi-physical or psychological elements envisioned by other schools.

K[edit]

  • ... innumerable ages ago and now because of faults and sins in that lifetime I was being degraded to a more grievous domain of existence and my karma was to be born in America where nobody has any fun or believes in anything, especially freedom.
  • Brahman/Achheram word is the immutable self on which all that lives, moves and has its being rests. Self is the spirit in man and nature. Karma is the creative impulse out of which life’s forms issue. The whole cosmic evolution is called karma.
  • Karma means work/activity/deed. It refers thought, action, and devotion. It is believed that a s/he’s Karma accumulates past and present years, with wrong deeds increasing the negative side, and good deeds such as help, kindness, soberness, and ascentism, increasing the positive.
    • Prof. Jitendra Dhoj Khand, in "Supreme God: Body, Will, Wisdom, and Work", P.207
Prof. Jitendra Dhoj Khand:The soul is always found to be in bondage (with its Karma) since the beginingless time and hence continuously undergoes the cycle of birth and death in these four states of existence until it attains liberation.
  • The soul continuously undergoes modifications as per the Karma/work it attracts and hence reincarnates in the [following] four states of existence: As a Demi God in Heaven, or as Tormented (tortured soul in hell, or as Human Beings on Continents, or as an Animal, or Plant or as a microorganism.
    • Prof. Jitendra Dhoj Khand, in "Supreme God: Body, Will, Wisdom, and Work", P.112
  • The soul is always found to be in bondage (with its Karma) since the beginingless time and hence continuously undergoes the cycle of birth and death in these four states of existence until it attains liberation.
    • Prof. Jitendra Dhoj Khand, in "Supreme God: Body, Will, Wisdom, and Work", p.113

L[edit]

Yes is the answer and you know that for sure … Millions of mind guerrillas
Putting their soul power to the karmic wheel. ~ John Lennon
  • Instant Karma's gonna get you
    Gonna knock you off your feet
    Better recognize your brothers
    Everyone you meet

    Why in the world are we here?
    Surely not to live in pain and fear
    Why on Earth are you there
    When you're everywhere
    Gonna get your share

    Well, we all shine on
    Like the moon and the stars and the sun
    Yeah, we all shine on
    C'mon and on and on, on, on

  • It just came to me. Everybody was going on about karma, especially in the Sixties. But it occurred to me that karma is instant as well as it influences your past life or your future life. There really is a reaction to what you do now. That's what people ought to be concerned about. Also, I'm fascinated by commercials and promotion as an art form. I enjoy them. So the idea of instant karma was like the idea of instant coffee: presenting something in a new form. I just liked it.
    • John Lennon, on his song "Instant Karma!", prompted by conversations with Melinde Kendall, the wife of Yoko Ono's former husband Tony Cox, who had used the phrase "Instant Karma", as quoted in All We Are Saying: The Last Major Interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono (2000) by David Sheff

M[edit]

The karma principle can be explained easily with the help of the lotus. The flower signifies human life as being governed by cause and effect. Every cause produces an imprint leading to an effect that can be experienced during the doer's lifetime or in his future life....~ V N Mittal, and TOI Crest
Ramana Maharshi:The law of Karma is a manifestation of God’s will. [He said] that prior to Self-realisation there is a personal God, Iswara, who controls each person’s destiny. It is Iswara who has ordained that everyone must suffer the consequences of his actions and it is Iswara who selects the sequences of activities that each person must undergo in each lifetime. One cannot escape from Iswara’s jurisdiction while one still identifies with the activities of the body. The only way to become free of his authority is to transcend Karma completely by realising the Self.
  • The law of Karma is a manifestation of God’s will. [He said] that prior to Self-realisation there is a personal God, Iswara, who controls each person’s destiny. It is Iswara who has ordained that everyone must suffer the consequences of his actions and it is Iswara who selects the sequences of activities that each person must undergo in each lifetime. One cannot escape from Iswara’s jurisdiction while one still identifies with the activities of the body. The only way to become free of his authority is to transcend Karma completely by realising the Self.
  • If the agent, upon whom the Karma depends, namely the ego, which has come into existence between the body and the Self, merges in its source and loses its form, how can the Karma, which depends upon it, survive? When there is no ‘I’ there is no Karma.
  • A man might have performed many Karmas in his previous births. A few of these alone will be chosen for this birth and he will have to enjoy their fruits in this birth. It is something like a slide show where the projectionist picks a few slides to be exhibited at a performance; the remaining slides being reserved for another performance. All this Karma can be destroyed by acquiring knowledge of the Self. The different Karmas are the slides, Karmas being the result of past experiences, and the mind is the projector. The projector must be destroyed so that there will be no further reflection and no further births and no deaths.
  • Individuals have to suffer their Karmas but Iswara manages to make the best of their Karmas for his purpose. God manipulates the fruits of Karma but he does not add or take away from it. The subconscious of man is a warehouse of good and bad Karma. Iswara chooses from this warehouse what he sees will best suit the spiritual evolution at the time of each man, whether pleasant or painful. Thus there is nothing arbitrary.
  • ... Karta (God) means Iswara. He is the one who distributes the fruits of actions to each person according to his Karma. That means that he is the manifest Brahman. The real Brahman is unmanifest and without motion. It is only the manifest Brahman that is named as Iswara. He gives the fruit to each person according to his actions (Karma). That means that Iswara is only an agent and that he gives wages according to the labour done. That is all. Without this Sakti (power) of Iswara, this Karma would not take place. That is why Karma is said to be on its own, inert.
  • If one mistake is rectified there yet remains the whole Sanchita Karma from former births which is going to give you innumerable births. So that is not the procedure. The more you prune a plant, the more vigorously it grows. The more you rectify your Karma, the more it accumulates. Find the root of Karma and cut it off.
  • Until realisation there will be Karma, that is action and reaction. After realisation there will be no Karma and no world.
  • If you are not the body and do not have the idea ‘I am the doer’, the consequences of your good or bad actions will not affect you. Why do you say about the actions the body performs ‘I do this’ or ‘I did that’? As long as you identify yourself with the body like that you are affected by the consequences of the actions, that is to say, while you identify with the body you accumulate good and bad Karma.
  • ...some schools of philosophy say that there is no God other than Karma of the previous birth, that is Karma done in the present birth in accordance with the scriptures is known as Purushkara (human effort), that the previous and present Karmas meet for a head-on fight like rams and that the one that is weaker gets eliminated. That is why these people say that one should strengthen Purushkara. If you ask such people what the origin of Karma is, they say that such a question is not to be raised as it is like the eternal question, ‘Which is earlier, the seed or the tree?'
  • The essence of Karma is to know the truth of oneself by enquiring ‘Who am I, the doer, who begins to do Karmas?’ Unless the doer of Karmas, the ego, is annihilated through enquiry, the perfect peace of supreme bliss, which is the result of Karma Yoga, cannot be achieved.
Ramana Maharshi:Prarabdha Karma is of three categories, Ichha, Anichha and Parechha (personally desired, without desire and due to others' desire). For the one who has realised the Self, there is no Ichha-Prarabdha but the two others, Anichha and Parechha, remain. Whatever a Jnani (Self-realised) does is for others only. If there are things to be done by him for others, he does them but the results do not affect him. Whatever be the actions that such people do, there is no Punya and no Papa attached to them. But they do only what is proper according to the accepted standard of the world – nothing else.
  • Prarabdha Karma is of three categories, Ichha, Anichha and Parechha (personally desired, without desire and due to others' desire). For the one who has realised the Self, there is no Ichha-Prarabdha but the two others, Anichha and Parechha, remain. Whatever a Jnani (Self-realised) does is for others only. If there are things to be done by him for others, he does them but the results do not affect him. Whatever be the actions that such people do, there is no Punya and no Papa attached to them. But they do only what is proper according to the accepted standard of the world – nothing else.
  • Every act must have its consequences. If anything comes your way by reason of Prarabdha, you can’t help it. If you take what comes, without any special attachment, and without any desire for more of it or for a repetition of it, it will not harm you by leading to further births. On the other hand, if you enjoy it with great attachment and naturally desire for more of it, it is bound to lead to more and more births.
  • The karma principle can be explained easily with the help of the lotus. The flower signifies human life as being governed by cause and effect. Every cause produces an imprint leading to an effect that can be experienced during the doer's lifetime or in his future life....Any person who dedicates all his karma to the Supreme, and carries them out without clinging to the result, remains unblemished by karmas just as the lotus is untouched and undrenched by water.

N[edit]

O[edit]

P[edit]

Q[edit]

R[edit]

Sharon Salzberg:Things don't just happen in this world of arising and passing away. We don't live in some kind of crazy, accidental universe. Things happen according to certain laws, laws of nature. Laws such as the law of karma, which teaches us that as a certain seed gets planted, so will that fruit be.
Sikhism:Sikhism is a faith of hope and cheer. Though it affirms Karma, it recognises the possibility of the modification of one's Karma with the grace of the Guru or God. It does not lead to despair and defeatism.
Prayer Wheel:One of the benefits of the prayer wheel is that it embodies all the actions of the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas of the 10 directions....
Candle-powered prayer wheel:...though rare type of Tibetan Prayer Wheel is one that is turned by a candle. It is believed that the light emitted from the candle removes negative karmas from those who touch it.
Jon Kabat-Zinn:Karma is often wrongly confused with the notion of a fixed destiny. It is more like an accumulation of tendencies that can lock us into particular behavior patterns, which themselves result in further accumulations of tendencies of a similar nature... But it is not necessary to be a prisoner of old karma.

S[edit]

  • Indeed in a certain sense two "I"s are identical namely when one disregards all special contents-their Karma. The goal of man is to preserve his karma and to develop it further when man dies his Karma lives and creates for itself another carrier.
  • Sikhism is a faith of hope and cheer. Though it affirms Karma, it recognises the possibility of the modification of one's Karma with the grace of the Guru or God. It does not lead to despair and defeatism.
  • Sikhs believe that human beings spend their time in a cycle of birth, life, and rebirth. They share this belief with followers of other Indian religious traditions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. The quality of each particular life depends on the law of Karma. Karma sets the quality of a life according to how well or badly a person behaved in their previous life. The only way out of this cycle, which all faiths regard as painful, is to achieve a total knowledge of and union with God.
  • If you oppress a man you will suffer oppression in this or another life and reap the fruit of the seed you have sown in this life. If you feed the poor, you will have plenty of food in this or another life. There is no power on this earth, which can stop the action from yielding their fruits. Such is the Law of Karma.
  • Prarabdha is that portion of the past karma which is responsible for the present body. That portion of the sanchita karma which influences human life in the present incarnation is called prarabdha. It is ripe for reaping. It cannot be avoided or changed. It is only exhausted by being experienced. You pay your past debts. Prarabdha karma is that which has begun and is actually bearing fruit. It is selected out of the mass of the sanchita karma.

T[edit]

I consider myself a road man for the lords of karma. ~ Hunter S. Thompson
  • Taoism tries to dissuade people from killing with the notion of Karma. According to Taoism, if people are kind of everything, they will have good karma, and bad karma, if they are not.
  • 'There's a huge difference between being arrested and being guilty … the law changes and I don't. How I stand vis-à-vis the law at any given moment depends on the law. The law can change from state to state, from nation to nation, from city to city. I guess I have to go by a higher law. How's that? Yeah, I consider myself a road man for the lords of karma.

U[edit]

V[edit]

  • The Law of Karma is a constant reminder that it is never too late to mend. All we need to do is to reflect upon our own innate purity and divinity, and follow the laws of nature, of which the Law of Karma is the law of divine goodwill and justice.

W[edit]

  • For those who want to purify negative karma, they can turn the Prayer Wheel and recite these mantras – Mitrugpa, Kunrig, Namgyalma, the Lotus Pinnacle or Amogapasha (wish granting wheel mantra) and the Stainless Pinnacle mantra.
  • May anyone who hears, sees, touches, or talks about this [Prayer Wheel] be able to spread the practice of turning the Dharma wheel to numberless [[w:Sentient beings|sentient beings, so that they will never be reborn in the three lower realms. May they be liberated from disease, spirit harms, negative karma, and obscurations, generate bodhichitta, and achieve enlightenment. May they then liberate numberless sentient beings.
  • There are many types of wheels – from the traditional ones turned by hand, to those turned by water or wind, even electric wheels are used. Another, though rare type of Tibetan Prayer Wheel is one that is turned by a candle. It is believed that the light emitted from the candle removes negative karmas from those who touch it.

X[edit]

Y[edit]

Z[edit]

  • Karma is often wrongly confused with the notion of a fixed destiny. It is more like an accumulation of tendencies that can lock us into particular behavior patterns, which themselves result in further accumulations of tendencies of a similar nature... But it is not necessary to be a prisoner of old karma.
  • Understanding the law of karma is known as the light of the world because through this understanding we can take responsibility for our destinies and be truly more guided to greater fulfillment in our lives.
    • Jon Kabat-Zinn, in "Radiant mind: essential Buddhist teachings and texts", P.298

Anonymous[edit]

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:
Wiktionary-logo-en.svg
Look up karma in Wiktionary, the free dictionary