Portuguese proverbs

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Proverbs from all Portuguese speaking countries.

A[edit]

  • Ainda que vistas a mona de seda, mona se queda.
    • English equivalent: A golden bit does not make the horse any better.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 52. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Alcança quem não cansa.
    • English equivalent: Faint heart never won fair lady.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 30. ISBN 1417964677. 
  • A caridade começa em casa.
    • English equivalent: Charity begins at home.
    • "If we neglect objects of charity at home, or within the circle of our immediate acquaintance, to extend our good deeds to those abroad, our sincerity, our motives, and our character, are suspected, and there is ground of suspicion. For it is in the order of nature to relieve, first, by our liberality and benefactions, those connected with us, - our families, and immediate neighborhood."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 51. 
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 547. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • A curiosidade matou o gato.
    • English equivalent: Curiosity killed the cat.
    • "Inquisitiveness – or a desire to find about something – can lead you into trouble."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 49. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 9 August 2013. 
    • Toniolo, Daniel. CAMINHOS QUE LEVAM A DEUS, OS. biblioteca24horas. p. 20. ISBN 8561590580. 
  • A experiência é mãe da ciência.
    • English equivalent: Experience is the mother of wisdom.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 808. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • A mal desesperado, remédio heróico.
    • English equivalent: Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.
    • "Drastic action is called for – and justified – when you find yourself in a particularly difficult situation."
    • Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 53. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 10 August 2013. 
    • Emanuel Strauss (11 January 2013). "812". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 552. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. Retrieved on 10 August 2013. 
  • A mentiroso, boa mémoria .
  • A necessidade não tem lei, mas a da fome sobre todas pode.
    • English equivalent: Necessity has no law.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 60. 
  • A roupa suja lava-se em casa.
    • English Equivalent: Don't wash your dirty linen in public; It is an ill bird that fouls its own nest.
    • Meaning: Don't speak in public of unpleasant private affairs; Don't speak ill of yourself and the groups you belong to.
    • F. Allen, Maria (2012). The Routledge Portuguese Bilingual Dictionary: Portuguese-English and English-Portuguese. Routledge. p. 439. ISBN 0415434343. 
  • A quem sabe esperar ensejo, tudo vem a seu tempo e desejo.
    • Idiomatic translation. He that can have patience can have what he will.
    • Other idiomatic translation: Patience is a remedy for every sorrow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 87. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • A união faz a força.
    • Idiomatic translation: United we stand, divided we fall; Union is strength.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 79. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Água mole em pedra dura, tanto dá até que fura.
    • English equivalent: Constant dropping wears the stone; Water dropping day by day wears the hardest rock away.
    • "A drop hollows out the stone by falling not twice, but many times; so too is a person made wise by reading not two, but many books."
    • (Giordano Bruno, Il Candelaio)
    • Lumpkin Taylor, James (1970). A Portuguese-English Dictionary (2, revised, annotated, reprint ed.). Stanford University Press. p. 310. ISBN 0804704805. 
  • Ao médico, ao letrado e ao abade, falar verdade.
    • Idiomatic translation: Conceal not the truth from thy physcian and lawyer.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 666. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • As aparências iludem. or, equivalently, As aparências enganam.
    • Translation: Looks can be deceiving.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 124. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Antes só do que mal acompanhado. (Brazil and Portugal)
    • Translation: It's better to be alone than in bad company.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 163. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Amigos amigos, negócios à parte.’’
    • Translation: Friends are friends, business is [something] aside.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 639. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Amor, fogo, e tosse, A seu dono descobre.
    • Idiomatic translation: Love, smoke and cough are hard to hide.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. 50. 
  • Amor verdadeiro, não envelhece.
    • Idiomatic translation: True love never grows old.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1107. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Ajuda-te que Deus te ajudará.
    • Translation: Help yourself and God will help you.
    • English equivalent: Heaven help those who help themselves.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Segíts magadon, Isten is megsegít.
    • Meaning: When in trouble first of all every one himself should do his best to improve his condition.
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 150. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 639. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • A sorte favorece os audazes.
    • Translation: Luck favours the bold.
    • Origin: Latin Virgil Audentes fortuna juvat Wikipedia
    • Dinis, Júlio (1985). Uma família inglesa. Editorial Comunicação. p. 46 pages = 596. 
  • A pressa é inimiga da perfeição.
    • Translation: Haste is the enemy of perfection.
    • English Equivalent: Haste makes waste.
    • Plá, Daniel (2001). Tudo Sobre Franchising. Senac. p. 40 pages = 160 isbn = 8587864106. 
  • A mentira tem perna curta.
    • Translation: Lies have short legs.
    • Meaning: The truth never stays hidden for long.
    • English Equivalent: The truth will out.
    • Andrade abrãao, Marcos. Filho de Elohim. Editora Naós Ltda. p. 12. ISBN 8577950417. 
  • Antes de mil anos todos seremos brancos.
    • Translation: In a hundred years we will be dead anyway.
    • English equivalent: It will all be the same a hundred years hence.
    • Meaning: So what if you embarrass yourself?
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 48. 
  • Até ao lavar dos cestos é vindima.
    • Translation: The time to collect grapes only ends with the washing of baskets.
    • Meaning: (1) We/They stay on until it's over. (2) Don't quit until it's over. (3) We / They will grab what we/they can while it lasts.
    • English Equivalent: It's not over 'till it's over.
    • English Equivalent: There's many a slip 'twixt cup and lip.
    • Copello, Marcelo (1994). SABORES DO DOURO E DO MINHO, OS: HISTORIAS, RECEITAS, VINHOS. Senac. p. 133. ISBN 857359764X. 
  • Ao bom varão, terras alheias pátria são.
    • Idiomatic translation: Great minds agree.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 882. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Ao homem amado a fortuna lhe dá a mão.
  • As paredes têm ouvidos.
    • Translation and English equivalent: The walls have ears.
    • Meaning: "What you say may be overheard; used as a warning."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 287. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 27 September 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 136. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • A noite é boa conselheira.
    • Translation: The night is a good advisor
    • Variant: O travesseiro é bom conselheiro
    • Translation: The pillow is a good advisor.
    • Meaning: Thinking things over sometimes helps to make things clearer.
    • English Equivalent: Sleep on it.
    • Moacyr, Othon (2004). Comunicação em Prosa Moderna: aprenda a escrever, aprendendo a pensar. FGV Editora,. p. 153. ISBN 852250296X. 
  • A verdade é clara e a mentira sombra.
    • Translation: The truth is bright and a lie is a shadow.
    • English equivalent: Truth gives a short answer, lies go round about; A lie is a shadow of truth; Truth fears no colors.
    • Latin equivalent: Obscuris vera involvens. and Veritas semper una est.
      • Translation: Obscurity envelops truth. respective The truth is always one.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1216. ISBN 0415096243. 

B[edit]

  • Bem sabe mandar quem bem sabe obedecer.
    • Translation: He who has not obeyed, cannot command.
    • English equivalent: Who has not served cannot command.
    • Meaning: One must have been controlled in the same situation one wishes to properly control others.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 855. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Boca de mel, coração de fel.
    • Idiomatic translation: A honey tongue and a heart of gall.
    • Note: A hypo proverb of Beware of wolves in sheep's clothing...
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 108. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Bom exemplo e boas razões avassalam os coracões.
    • Idiomatic translation: Lead by example.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 55. ISBN 0415160502. 

C[edit]

  • Cada cabelo faz sua sombra na terra.
    • Idiomatic translation: A bad bush is better than no shelter; Every hair casts its shadow; There is no little enemy.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 4. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cada carneiro por seu pé pende.
    • Idiomatic translation: Each sheep hangs by it's own foot.
    • Meaning: We must depend on ourselves, financially and in all other matters.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 777. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cada coisa a seu tempo.
    • English equivalent: Man proposes, God disposes.
    • "Plans are insulted destinies. I don't have plans, I only have goals."
    • Ash Chandler, Freudian Slip, Mumbai Mirror Buzz, April 2006.
    • Caroline Ward (1842). National Proverbs in the Principal Languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 29. 
  • Cão que ladra não morde.
    • Translation: Barking dog doesn't bite.
    • Meaning: People who only talk aren't dangerous.
    • English equivalent: Barking dogs seldom bite.
    • Meaning: People who make the most or the loudest threats are the least likely to take action.
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 20 June 2013. 
    • Taylor, James Lumpkin; Martin, Priscilla Clark (1970). A Portuguese-English Dictionary. Stanford University Press, ,. p. 378. ISBN 9780804704809. 
  • Conforme a pergunta, assim a resposta. Tal voz, tal eco.
    • Idiomatic translation: Just as one calls into the forest, so it echoes back.
    • Meaning: Do not expect friendly reply when being obnoxious.
    • Meaning: Bad language may have other causes than innate bad character.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 139. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Como canta o abade, assim responde o sacristão.
    • Translation: As the abbot sings, so the sacristan responds.
    • Meaning: Children will become like older generations.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Como me medires assim te medirei.
    • Idiomatic translation: Whatever measure you deal out to others will be dealt back to you.
    • English equivalent: What goes around comes around.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1219. ISBN 0415096243. 

D[edit]

  • De amigo reconciliado e de caldo requentado, nunca bom bocado.
    • Idiomatic translation: Take heed of enemies reconciled and of meat twice boiled.
    • Meaning: Your former enemies might cunningly take revenge on you just out of spite; Trust not a reconciled enemy more than an open foe.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 25. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • De boas intenções está o Inferno cheio.
    • Translation: Hell is full of good intentions.
    • English Equivalent: The road to Hell is paved with good intentions.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: A pokolba vezető út jóindulattal van kikövezve.
    • Alves Pinto, CiÇa (1994). LIVRO DOS PROVERBIOS, DITADOS, DITOS POPULARES E: ANEXINS Utgåva 5. Senac. p. 93. ISBN 9788573597974. 
  • De boi manso me guarde Deus, que de mau eu me guardarei.
    • Idiomatic translation: A man's worst enemies are often those of his own house.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 52. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De casta vem ao galgo ter o rabo longo.
    • Idiomatic translation: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Meaning: Children observe daily and — in their behaviour — often follow the example of their parents.
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 488. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De grandes ceias estão as sepulturas cheias.
    • English equivalent: Gluttony kills more than the sword.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 864. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • De maus costumes nascem boas leis.
    • Idiomatic translation: Good laws have sprung from bad customs.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Dê ao Diabo o que é dele.
    • Translation: Be fair to the devil.
    • English equivalent: Give the devil his due.
    • Meaning: "People deserve recognition for their skills and contributions even if they are otherwise unworthy or unlikeable."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2009). The Facts on File Dictionary of Allusions. Infobase Publishing. p. 337. ISBN 978-0-8160-7105-0. 
    • Flonta, Teodor (2002). God and the Devil: Proverbs in 9 Euorpean Languages. Teodor Flonta. p. 21. ISBN 1875943412. 
  • Debaixo de bom saio está o homem mau.
    • Translation: Underneath the good there comes out a bad man.
    • English equivalent: Never judge by appearances; Judge not a man and things at first sight.
    • Meaning: Things are not always as they seem, and you can not necessarily trust the evidence of your eyes.
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 10. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 18 June 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 713. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Deitar cedo e cedo erguer dá saúde e faz crescer.
    • Translation: Early sleep and early wake up, gives health and makes you grow.
    • Ironic variant rarely used: Deitar cedo e cedo erguer dá saúde e faz sono. ([...] and makes you sleepy.)
    • English Equivalent: Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
    • Meaning: "A lifestyle that involves neither staying up late nor sleeping late is good for body and mind and leads to financial success."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 70. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 5 September 2013. 
  • Deus dá do seu bem.
    • English equivalent: He who serves God has a good master.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "1063". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 873. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • "Diz-me com quem andas, dir-te-ei que manhas tens.
  • Do contado come o lobo.
    • English equivalent: Cats eat what hussies spare.
    • Meaning; "What a person tries to keep back through meanness is just as likely to be wasted anyway."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Pickering, David (1997). "X". Cassell Dictionary of Proverbs. Continuum International Publishing Group, Limited. p. X. ISBN 978-0-304-35020-9. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 641. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Do néscio às vezes bom conselho.
    • English equivalent: A fool may give a wise man counsel.
    • Meaning: "People are often able to give good advice to those who are considered to be intellectually superior; sometimes said apologetically by the giver of such advice, or used as a warning against disregarding it."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Manser, Martin H. (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 92. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1194). "139". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 135. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 

E[edit]

  • È frequente o riso, na boca de quem não tem siso.
    • English equivalent: A fool is ever laughing.
    • Emanuel Strauss (1994). "137". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 102. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • Em boca fechada as moscas não têm entrada.
    • Translation: Into a closed mouth no flies ever entered.
    • English equivalent: A close mouth catches no flies.
    • Meaning: It is wise not to speak when it is not necessary.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 73. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Em casa de ferreiro o pior apeiro.
    • Idiomatic translation: Cobblers' children are worst shod.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 661. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Entre marido e mulher não se mete a colher.
    • Translation: Between husband and wife, one doesn't put the spoon.
    • Variant: Entre marido e mulher não metas a colher.
    • English Equivalent: Don't go between the dog and the tree.
    • Ganho, Ana Sofia; McGovern, Timothy Michael (2004). Using Portuguese: A Guide to Contemporary Usage. Cambridge University Press. p. 69. ISBN 0521796636. 
  • Enquanto há vida, há esperança.
    • Translation: While there's life, there's hope.
    • Ganho, Ana Sofia; McGovern, Timothy Michael (2004). Using Portuguese: A Guide to Contemporary Usage. Cambridge University Press. p. 88. ISBN 0521796636. 
  • É de pequenino que se torce o pepino.
    • Translation: It's when it's small that the cucumber gets warped.
    • Meaning: Bad habits acquired during early life last long; Children should learn good habits from a tender age.
    • English Equivalent: Soon crooks the tree that good gambrel would be.
    • Ganho, Ana Sofia; McGovern, Timothy Michael (2004). Using Portuguese: A Guide to Contemporary Usage. Cambridge University Press. p. 89. ISBN 0521796636. 

F[edit]

  • Falar, falar não enche barriga.
    • Idiomatic translation: Fine words butter no parsnips.
    • Meaning: Merely talking about a problem will not solve it.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 31. 
    • Source for meaning: Speake, Jennifer; Simpson, John (2009). The Oxford dictionary of proverbs. Oxford University Press. pp. 388. ISBN 0199539537. 
  • Fazei-vos mel, comer-vos-ão as moscas.
    • Idiomatic translation: He that makes himself an ass must not take it ill if men ride him.
    • Meaning: Other people will abuse you, if you let them.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 676. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Fazer da necessidade virtude.

G[edit]

  • Génio e figura, até à sepultura.
    • Idiomatic translation: What is bred in the bone will not go out of the flesh.
    • Meaning: You can seldom change core human nature with the help of logic.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 985. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Guarda moço, acharás velho.
    • Idiomatic translation: Diligent youth makes easy age.
    • Meaning: If you live your youth years diligently, it will save you from regret when you are old. That is, you do things you like that virtually only young people can do; It will be all the things you never did which you will regret.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 701. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Gostos não se discutem.
    • Translation: You don't discuss tastes.
    • English Equivalent: There is no accounting for taste.
    • Flonta, Teodor (2001). A Dictionary of English and Portuguese: Equivalent Proverbs. Teodor Flonta. pp. 220. ISBN 1875943218. 

H[edit]

  • Hoje por mim, amanhã por ti.
    • Translation: Today for me, and tomorrow for you.
    • English equivalent: Today me, tomorrow thee.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1038. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Huim roim se toma com outro roim.
    • Idiomatic translation: Set a thief to catch a thief.
    • Mrs Mawr, E B (2005). Analogous Proverbs In Ten Languages (reprint ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 74. ISBN 1417964677. 

L[edit]

  • Longe dos olhos, longe do coração. (can also be Longe da vista (sight), longe do coração)
    • Translation: Far from the eyes, far from the heart.
    • English Equivalent: Out of sight, out of mind.
    • Variation: O que os olhos não vêem, o coração não sente. (What the eyes don't see, the heart doesn't feel.)
    • Ganho, Ana Sofia; McGovern, Timothy Michael (2004). Using Portuguese: A Guide to Contemporary Usage. Cambridge University Press. p. 90. ISBN 0521796636. 

M[edit]

  • Mais vale andar só que mal acompanhado.
    • Translation: It is better to be alone than to be in bad company.
    • English equivalent: Better be alone than in bad company.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 572. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Mais vale tarde do que nunca.
    • Translation: Delayed is preferable to never.
    • English equivalent: Better late than never.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Jobb későn, mint soha.
    • Meaning: "It is better that somebody arrives or something happens later than expected or desired, than not at all."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 25. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 30 June 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 584. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Mal me querem as comadres porque lhes digo as verdades.
    • Idiomatic translation: All truths are not to be told.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 282. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Mais vale saber que haver e dar que receber.
    • Idiomatic translation: A good mind possesses a kingdom.
    • Meaning: Material assets are fleeting, but intellectual assets will basically stay with you for the rest of your life. Therefore, intellectual assets are much more worth than material ones.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 58. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Mais vale um pássaro na mão do que dois a voar.(Portugal)
  • Mais vale um pássaro na mão do que dois voando.(Brazil)
    • Translation: A bird in the hand has more worth than two flying.
    • English Equivalent: A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Jobb ma egy túzok, mint holnap egy veréb.
    • Meaning: "Something you have for certain now is of more value than something better you may get, especially if you risk losing what you have in order to get it."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 28. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 29 July 2013. 
    • András Dugonics (1820). Magyar példa beszédek és jeles mondások. Grünn Orbán. p. 23. Retrieved on 29 July 2013. 
    • Ganho, Ana Sofia; McGovern, Timothy Michael (2004). Using Portuguese: A Guide to Contemporary Usage. Cambridge University Press. p. 90. ISBN 0521796636. 
  • Mais vale tarde do que nunca. (Portugal)
  • Antes tarde do que nunca. (Brazil)
    • Translation: Better late than never.
    • English Equivalent: Better late than never.
    • Ganho, Ana Sofia; McGovern, Timothy Michael (2004). Using Portuguese: A Guide to Contemporary Usage. Cambridge University Press. p. 88. ISBN 0521796636. 
  • Mais vale pão duro que nenhum.
    • Idiomatic translation: Better an egg today than a hen tomorrow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 75. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Mais vale prevenir do que remediar. (Portugal)
  • É melhor prevenir do que remediar. (Brasil)
    • Translation: It's best to prevent than to have to remedy (or fix).
    • English Equivalent: Better safe than sorry; An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
    • Herminii, Herminia. Nominalia. José Rabaça Gaspar deNomios. p. 485. ISBN 141353547X. 
  • Mãos beija o homem que quisera ver cortadas.
    • Idiomatic translation: Many kiss the hand they wish to see cut off.
    • ** Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1084. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Melhor é curar goteira, que casa inteira.
    • English equivalent: A stitch in time saves nine.
    • "No one needs to be told that a vast deal of labor is expended unnecessarily. This is occasioned, to a great extent, by the neglect of seasonable repairs."
    • Source for meaning:Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 13. 
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 6. 
  • Mete a mão em teu seio, não dirás do fado alheio.
    • Idiomatic translation: Forget other faults remembering your own; Forgive and forget.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 838. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Mil amigos, pouco; um inimigo, demais.
    • Translation: Thousand friends, little, an enemy, too much.
    • English equivalent: Do not think that one enemy is insignificant, or that a thousand friends are too many.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 718. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Muita palha e pouco grão.
    • English equivalent: Much bran and little meal.
    • Meaning: "Much ado about nothing."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Keating, Walter (1859). Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Company (late D. Bogue). p. 128. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "178". Dictionary of European Proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 173. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 

N[edit]

  • Não fies, nem porfies, nem filho doutro cries.
    • Idiomatic translation: Diffidence is the right eye of prudence.
    • Meaning: Diffidently pondering something will often lead to a sensible solution.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 701. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Não chore sobre o leite derramado.
    • Translation: Don't cry over spilt milk.
    • English equivalent: There is no use crying over spillt milk.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Késő bánat, eb gondolat.
    • Chang Tong, Jonh Yen. Bolsa de Valores Visao Feliz E Optimsta de Tres Geracoes. Editora AGE Ltda. p. 75. ISBN 8574971979. 
  • Não há galinha gorda por pouco dinheiro.
    • Translation: there are no fat chicken for little money (for cheap).
    • Meaning: there are no big bargains. Be suspicious otherwise.
    • English Equivalent: The only free cheese is in the mouse trap.
    • Machado, José Pedro (1996). O grande livro dos provérbios. Editorial Notícias. p. 326. ISBN 8574971979. 
  • Não há duas sem três.
    • Translation: There's no two without a three.
    • Meaning: If it happened twice, it will happen again.
    • English equivalent:
    • Machado, José Pedro (1996). O grande livro dos provérbios. Editorial Notícias. p. 397. ISBN 8574971979. 
  • Não há glória sem inveja.
    • Idiomatic translation: Envy always shoots at a high mark.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 766. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Não há pior cego que o que não quer ver.
    • Idiomatic translation: There are no worse blinds than those who do not want to see.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 320. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Não há pior surdo que o que não quer ouvir.
    • Idiomatic translation: None so deaf as those who will not hear.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1110. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Não há regra sem excepção.
    • Translation: There exists no rule without exceptions.
    • English equivalent: There is no rule without an exception.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1174. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Não deixes para amanhã o que podes fazer hoje.
    • Translation: Don't leave for tomorrow what you can do today.
    • Hungarian equivalent: Amit ma megtehetsz, ne halaszd holnapra.
    • Ganho, Ana Sofia; McGovern, Timothy Michael (2004). Using Portuguese: A Guide to Contemporary Usage. Cambridge University Press. p. 90. ISBN 0521796636. 
  • Não se atiram pedras senão às árvores que têm fruto.
    • Translation: Rocks are only thrown at the trees who bear fruit.
    • English equivalent: if you have no enemies it is a sign that fortune has forgotten you; People throw stones only at trees with fruit on them.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1008. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Não se caçam lebres tocando tambor.
    • Idiomatic translation: Drumming is not the way to catch a hare.
    • Meaning: Don't expect anyone to change his ways by scolding him.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 754. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Não se muda de cavalo no meio de banhado.
    • Translation: Horses are not to be changed in the middle of the current.
    • Note: When in water it is ardous to mount and dismount.
    • English equivalent: Don't change horses in midstream.
    • Meaning: It is often wise not to quit an undertaking already begun.
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 63. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 18 August 2013. 
    • Teodor Flonta (2001). "841". A Dictionary of English and Portuguese Equivalent Proverbs. Teodor Flonta. p. 204. ISBN 978-1-875943-21-0. Retrieved on 23 August 2013. 
  • Nem tudo que reluz é ouro.
    • Variant: Nem tudo o que brilha é ouro.
    • Translation: Not everything that shines is gold.
    • English equivalent: All that glitters is not gold.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Nem mind arany, ami fénylik.
    • Meaning: An attractive appearance may be deceptive. It may cover or hide a much less favourable content.
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 114. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Costa, J. J. (2009). A sabedoria dos ditados populares. Butterfly Editora. p. 30. ISBN 858847784X. 
  • Nunca Deus fecha uma porta que não abra outra.
    • English equivalent: When one door closes another opens.
    • Meaning: "When baffled in one direction a man of energy will not despair, but will find another way to his object."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Company (late D. Bogue). 1859. p. 67. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 845. ISBN 0415096243. 

O[edit]

  • O passarinho ama o seu ninho.
    • English equivalent: The bird loves her own nest.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "923". Dictionary of European Proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 776. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Os cães ladram mas a caravana passa.
    • Translation: Dogs bark, but the caravan keeps on.
    • Meaning: Pay no attention to what people say about you.
    • Note: From an Arab proverb.
    • Mondaini, Marco (2008). Direitos Humanos No Brasil Contemporâneo. Editora Universitária UFPE. p. 82. ISBN 8573155302. 
  • Onde se ganha o pão, não se come a carne.
    • Where you earn your bread, you don't eat the meat.
    • Meaning: Different segments of your life must remain contiguous, such as your love life, business and leisure.
    • English Equivalent: You don't shit where you eat.
    • Tettê, Schmidt; Tavares, Ulisses. Guia do Homem. Geração Editorial. p. 91. ISBN 8575090313. 
  • Onde vai mais fundo o rio, aí faz menos ruído.
    • Idiomatic translation: Still waters run deep.
    • Meaning: He who is taciturn might be that because his head is filled with ambitious thoughts.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 70. 
  • O que os olhos não vêem, o coração não sente.
    • Translation: What the eyes don't see the heart doesn't feel.
    • English Equivalent: Out of sight, out of mind.
    • Variation: Longe dos olhos, longe do coração. (Far from the eyes, far from the heart.)
    • Machado, José Pedro (1996). O grande livro dos provérbios. Editorial Notícias. p. 397. ISBN 8574971979. 
  • O que se aprende no berço sempre dura.
    • Translation: Old habits die hard.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1122. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • O barato sai caro.
    • Variant: O que é barato sai caro.
    • Translation: What is cheap is costly.
    • Meaning: The cheap things prove to be expensive at the end.
    • English Equivalent: If you buy cheaply, you pay dearly.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 53. ISBN 0415160502. 

P[edit]

  • Paciência excede sapiência.
    • Translation: With patience you go beyond knowledge.
    • English equivalent: An ounce of patience is worth a pound of brains.
    • Meaning: Patience can often do more than your wits.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 415. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Pior é ter mau médico que estar enfermo.
    • English equivalent: The remedy is often worse than the disease; Burn not your house to rid it off the mouse.
    • Meaning: The effect of a treatment or bodily enhancement – whether pharmaceutical or not, whether a household remedy or professional-ordained – is often worse than what it was intended to cure or alleviate.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. entry 646. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Primeiro a obrigação, depois a devoção.
    • Translation: First comes duty, then devotion.
    • English Equivalent: Business before pleasure.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Előbb a munka, aztán a szórakozás.
    • Meaning: First do your work, and only then what you best like.
    • A. Alves, Rubem (1992). O retorno e terno. Papirus Editora. p. 69. ISBN 8530802152. 

Q[edit]

  • Qual é Maria, tal filha cria.
    • Translation: Mary will foster a daughter like herself.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • Meaning: Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Quando o bem te chegar, mete-o em casa.
    • Idiomatic translation: Opportunity knocks only once.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 400. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Quem espera, desespera.
    • Translation: He who hopes, despairs.
    • English equivalent: He that lives on hope will die fasting.
    • Meaning: "Do not pin all your hopes on something you may not attain, because you could up with end nothing."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent:Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 120. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 952. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Quem ama o Beltrão, ama seu cão (irmão).
    • Translation: He who loves Beltrão, loves his dog (brother).
    • Idiomatic translation: Love me, love my dog.
    • Meaning: If you love someone, you like virtually everything about him.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 953. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Quem não pode como quer, queira como pode.
    • Idiomatic translation: Do as you may, if you can't do as you could.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 707. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Quem se afoga, às palhas se agarra.
    • Idiomatic translation: A drowning man plucks at a straw.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 33. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Quem tem telhado de vidro não atira pedras [no telhado do vizinho]. (Portugal)
  • Quem tem telhado de vidro não joga pedra [no telhado do vizinho]. (Brazil)
    • Translation: Those with glass roof shouldn't throw stones [to their neighbor’s].
    • If you're vulnerable you shouldn't be attacking others.
    • English Equivalent: People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.
    • Ganho, Ana Sofia; McGovern, Timothy Michael (2004). Using Portuguese: A Guide to Contemporary Usage. Cambridge University Press. p. 91. ISBN 0521796636. 
  • Quem muito abarca pouco abraça.
    • Translation: He who grasps at too much loses everything.
    • English Equivalent: Grasp all, lose all.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 886. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Quem não arrisca não petisca.
    • Translation: He who doesn't take a chance won't nibble.
    • Meaning: If you don't try, or take the risk, you can't have any profit.
    • English Equivalent: Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: Aki nem játszik, az nem is nyer.
    • Meaning: It is necessary to take risks in order to achieve something.
    • Taylor, Martin (1970). A portuguese-english dictionary: revised. University Press. p. 72. ISBN 0804704805. 
  • Quem não quer ser lobo não lhe vista a pele.
    • Translation: He who doesn't want to be a wolf shouldn't wear it's hide.
    • Meaning: If you don't want to be treated like a [something], don't act like one.
    • Alves Pinto, CiÇa. LIVRO DOS PROVERBIOS, DITADOS, DITOS POPULARES E: ANEXINS. Senac. p. 91. ISBN 8573597976. 
  • Quem está no convento é que sabe o que lhe vai dentro.
    • Translation: [Only] He who is in the convent knows what goes on inside.
    • English equivalent: No one knows where the shoe pinches, but he who wears it.
    • Meaning: "Nobody can fully understand another person's hardship or suffering."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 289. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 886. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Quem boa cama faz nela se deita.
    • Translation: He who makes a good bed sleeps on it.
    • Meaning: You reap what you sow.
    • Alternative meaning: You did a good thing, now use it.
    • English Equivalent: As you make your bed, so you must lie in it.
    • Azevedo, Arthur (1983). Teatro de Artur Azevedo, Volym 1. Instituto Nacional de Artes Cênicas. p. 68. 
  • Quem quando pode não quer, quando quer não pode.
    • English equivalent: He that will not when he may, when he will he may have nay.
    • Meaning: "Take advantage of an opportunity when it presents itself, even if you do not want or need it at the time, because it may no longer be available when you do."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent:Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 120. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. 41. 
  • Quanto mais depressa mais devagar.
    • Translation: the faster, the slower.
    • Variation: Quantas mais pressas mais vagares.
    • Usage: About things made fast (or in haste) that end up being done slower than usual.
    • English Equivalent: Make haste slowly.
    • Machado, José Pedro (1996). O grande livro dos provérbios. Editorial Notícias. p. 467. ISBN 8574971979. 
  • Quando a esmola é demais, até o santo desconfia.
    • Translation: When the alms is too large, even a saint will be suspicious.
    • English equivalent: When something seems too good to be true, usually it is.
    • Variation: Quando a esmola é muita, o pobre desconfia.
      • Translation: When the alms is too much, the poor will be suspicious.
    • Variant: Quando a esmola é grande o santo desconfia.
    • Costa, J. J. (2009). A sabedoria dos ditados populares. Butterfly Editora. p. 20. ISBN 858847784X. 
  • Quem o pássaro quer tomar, não o há-de enxotar.
    • English equivalent: Deal gently with the bird you mean to catch.
    • When people are just, they need friendship in addition.
    • Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (c. 325 BC), Book VIII, 1155.a26
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 689. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Quem segura a enguia pelo rabo e a mulher pela palavra, pode dizer que nada segura.
    • Idiomatic translation: You might as well try to hold an eel by the tail.
    • Meaning: Don't take a man by his word.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 480. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Quem vê cara não vê coração.
    • Translation: He who looks at the face doesn't see the heart.
    • Variant: Quem vê caras não vê corações. (Port.)
    • Translation: He who sees faces doesn't see hearts.
    • Meaning: You can't know what goes inside people by just looking.
    • English Equivalent: You can't tell a book by its cover.
    • Ganho, Ana Sofia; McGovern, Timothy Michael (2004). Using Portuguese: A Guide to Contemporary Usage. Cambridge University Press. p. 91. ISBN 0521796636. 

S[edit]

  • Se caçares, não te gabes; se não caçares, não te enfades.
    • Idiomatic translation: If fortune favours, beware of being exalted; if fortune thunders, beware of being overwhelmed.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1001. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Se Maomé não vai à montanha, a montanha vai a Maomé.
    • Translation: If Mohammad won't go to the mountain, the mountain will go to Mohammad.
    • English equivalent: If the mountain will not come to Mohammed, Mohammed must go to the mountain.
    • Meaning: "If you cannot get what you want, you must adapt yourself to the circumstances or adopt a different approach."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 135. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Steinberg (1985). 1001 provérbios em contraste. Nova Alexandria. p. 56. ISBN 8574920452. 
  • Quem não quer ser lobo não lhe vista a pele.
    • Translation: He who doesn't want to be a wolf shouldn't wear it's hide.
    • Meaning: If you don't want to be treated like a [something], don't act like one.
    • Alves Pinto, CiÇa. LIVRO DOS PROVERBIOS, DITADOS, DITOS POPULARES E: ANEXINS. Senac. p. 110. ISBN 8573597976. 
  • Serve o senhor e saberas o que é dor.
    • Idiomatic translation: A king's favour is no inheritance.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 24. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Sol que muito madruga, pouco dura.
    • Idiomatic translation: Early ripe, early rotten.
    • Meaning: Precocious children will mean much trouble later on.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 758. ISBN 0415096243. 

T[edit]

  • Tal pai, tal filho.
    • Translation: Such father, such son.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • Meaning: Sons may look and behave like their fathers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily.
    • Source for meaning and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Flonta, Teodor (2001). A Dictionary of English and Portuguese: Equivalent Proverbs. Teodor Flonta. p. entry 536. ISBN 1875943218. 
  • Tal tronco, tal acha.
    • Idiomatic translation: You must meet roughness with roughness.
    • Example: If someone treats you poorly, you should treat him equally poorly.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 12. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Tarde dar e negar estão a par
    • Idiomatic translation: He gives twice, who gives in a trice.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 38. 
  • Tempo e maré, não esperam por ninguém.
    • English equivalent: Time and tide waits for no man.
    • Meaning: "Take, for illustration, the case of the negligent and unreflecting man. He resolves to accomplish a certain important object at some future period; but in the intervening time, some preparatory, though in itself comparatively trifling business, is indispensable. He defers this business; [...] At length the period for accomplishing the ultimate object arrives: but, alas! the prerequisite, so absolutely connected and essential, is neglected And then, vain man!
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 169. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 723. ISBN 0415096243. 

U[edit]

  • Uma ovelha má põe o rebanho a perder.
    • Translation: A bad sheep puts the herd to waste.
    • Meaning: A bad person can influence many others to behave in a bad way.
    • English Equivalent: one bad apple ruins the bunch.
    • Merryman, Montgomery; McGovern, Timothy Michael (1951). Portuguese: a portrait of the language of Brazil. Uniaõ Cultural Brasil-Estados Unidos. p. 118. 
  • Um homem prevenido vale por dois.
    • Translation: A forewarned man is worth two (men).
    • English Equivalent: Forewarned is forearmed.
    • See: Homem prevenido vale por dois.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 103. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Uma desgraça nunca vem só.
    • Translation: a misfortune never comes alone.
    • English equivalent: Misery loves company.
    • Hungarian Equivalent: A baj nem jár egyedül.
    • A. Abrantes, Sílvio (1994). Códigos Correctores de Erros em Comunicações Digitais. FEUP Edições. p. 243. ISBN 9727521274. 

V[edit]

  • Vassoura nova varre sempre bem.
    • Idiomatic translation: New brooms sweep clean.
    • Meaning: Newcomers are the most ambitious.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1103. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Vai muito do dizer ao fazer.
    • Translation: There's a long way from saying to doing.
    • English Equivalent: Easier said than done.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1040. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Voz do povo, voz de Deus.
    • Translation: The people's voice is God's voice.
    • Meaning: You had better heed when many people gather spontaneously about some cause.
    • Meaning: The voices of gossipers in the marketplace are God's own
    • Meaning: what you can hear here and there is unquestionable because everybody is saying it
    • Note: A meta-proverb: a proverb about proverbs, the people's wisdom.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1164. ISBN 0415096243.