Affidavit

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An affidavit is a written sworn statement of fact voluntarily made by an affiant or deponent under an oath or affirmation administered by a person authorized to do so by law.

Quotes[edit]

  • We cannot suffer a person by his affidavit to arraign the whole justice of the country and its administration.
    • Abbott, C.J., Case of Edmonds and others (1821), 1 St. Tr. (N. S.) 924; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, The Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 10.
  • I am a trial lawyer…. Matilda says that at dinner on a good day I sound like an affidavit.
  • We cannot try the merits upon affidavit.
    • Lord Mansfield, Rex v. Blooer (1760), 2 Burr. Part IV. 1045; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, The Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 9.
  • So many affidavits, so studiously and artfully penned, to be safely sworn in one sense and read in another, are an aggravation.
    • Lord Mansfield, Rex v. Beardmore (1759), 2 Burr. Part IV. 795; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, The Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 10.
  • And now I will try to defend myself against them: these new accusers must also have their affidavit read. What do they say? Something of this sort: — That Socrates is a doer of evil, and corrupter of the youth, and he does not believe in the gods of the state, and has other new divinities of his own.

External links[edit]

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