Alexander Chase

From Wikiquote
Jump to: navigation, search

Stuart Alexander Chase (1926-(??)) is or was an American journalist and editor.

Quotes[edit]

  • To remain young one must change. The perpetual campus hero is not a young man but an old boy.
    • Alexander Chase, cited in: Everett McKinley Dirksen (1981), The World book complete word power library - Volume 1. p. 297
  • One who understands much displays a greater simplicity of character than one who understands little.
    • Alexander Chase, cited in: Encyclopedia of World Problems and Human Potential, (1986), p.
  • The movie actor, like the sacred king of primitive tribes, is a god in captivity.
    • Alexander Chase, cited in: Douglas R. Suisman ( 1989), Los Angeles boulevard: eight x-rays of the body public. p. 39
  • More and more people care about religious tolerance as fewer and fewer Care about religion.
    • Alexander Chase, cited in: Michael Otto Ekpenyong (2005). Beware of Gods p. 93
  • To the average cigarette ]]smoker]] the world is his ashtray.
    • Alexander Chase, cited in: Roseane M. Santos (2007), Coffee: The Revolutionary Drink for Pleasure and Health. p. 131

Perspectives, 1966[edit]

Alexander Chase, Perspectives, 1966.

  • Psychiatry's chief contribution to philosophy is the discovery that the toilet is the seat of the soul.
    • Cited in: Rhoda Thomas Tripp (1970), The International Thesaurus of Quotations, p. 517
  • Music has charms to soothe a savage breast — but not the unmusical one.
    • Cited in: Sandra Lee Stuart (1980), Who won what when: the record book of winners. p. 353
    • Comment: The statement "Music has charms to soothe a savage breast," is a not uncommon 19th century saying. For example Cyprian Cope (1899) in Arabesques: A Perspective, p. 108 stated, that : The world of letters has long known that ' music hath charms to soothe the savage breast.' But few of the unmusical, wholly untutored that...
  • Gods are born and die, but the atom endures.
    • Cited in: Jefferson Hane Weaver et al. (1987), The World of Physics: The Einstein universe and the Bohr atom.
  • When a machine begins to run without human aid, it is time to scrap it - whether it be a factory or a government.
    • Cited in: Anna Hart (1988) Expert systems: an introduction for managers. p. 111.
  • To attempt suicide is a criminal offense. Any man who, of his own will, tries to escape the treadmill to which the rest of us feel chained incites our envy, and therefore our fury. We do not suffer him to go unpunished.
    • Cited in: Peter Potter (1988), All about death, p. 41
  • People, like sheep, tend to follow a leader - occasionally in the right direction.
    • Cited in: Jonathon Green (1988), Says who?: a guide to the quotations of the century, p. 175
  • The banalities of a great man pass for wit.
    • Cited in: Jonathon Green (1988), Says who?: a guide to the quotations of the century, p. 176
  • For the unhappy man death is the commutation of a sentence of life imprisonment.
    • Cited in: Jonathon Green (1988), Says who?: a guide to the quotations of the century, p. 176
  • The rich man may never get into heaven, but the pauper is already serving his time in hell.
    • Cited in: Jonathon Green (1988), Says who?: a guide to the quotations of the century, p. 176
  • There are few successful adults who were not at first successful children.
    • cited in: Wesley Douglass Camp (1989), What a Piece of Work is Man!: Camp's Unfamiliar Quotations from 2000 B.C. to the Present, p. 124
  • Walking in space, man has never looked more puny or more significant.
    • Cited in: Wesley Douglass Camp (1989), What a Piece of Work is Man!: Camp's Unfamiliar Quotations from 2000 B.C. to the Present, p. 139
  • The peak of tolerance is most readily achieved by those who are not burdened with convictions.
    • Cited in: Wesley Douglass Camp (1989), What a Piece of Work is Man!: Camp's Unfamiliar Quotations from 2000 B.C. to the Present, p. 397
  • Memory is the thing you forget with.
    • Cited in: David Samuel (1999). Memory: How We Use It, Lose It, and Can Improve it. p. 71
  • Lovers of air travel find it exhilarating to hang poised between the illusion of immortality and the fact of death.
    • Cited in: William L. Ippolito (2003), Leaving on a Jet Plane. p. 153
  • The rich man may never get into heaven, but the pauper is already serving his term in hell.
    • Cited in: Mark Robert Rank (2004), One Nation, Underprivileged: Why American Poverty Affects Us All.
  • Without the spice of guilt, sin cannot be fully savored
    • Cited in: Larry Chang (ed,) (2006). Wisdom for the Soul. p. 348

Misattributed[edit]

  • All generalizations are false, including this one.
    • Attributed to Alexander Chase, for example in: Gregory F. Pfister. In Search of Clusters: The Coming Battle in Lowly Parallel Computing. Prentice Hall PTR, 1995.
    • This quote is mentioned earlier, for example in the 1930s, and is attributed to François de La Rochefoucauld and Mark Twain.

Quotes about Alexander Chase[edit]

  • Apart from his comment on the propensity of people to follow where their leader beckons, even when for a change he may actually be taking them where they ought to go, his book includes these comments, none of them very cheering
    • Jonathon Green (1988). Says who?: a guide to the quotations of the century. p. 176
  • The pavement ritual showed the industry's diurnal business face, all hustle and press agents and shaking hands, with the selected star brought down from studio Olympus (or at least the Hollywood Hills) before a public audience in broad daylight, a scene which recalls Alexander Chase's observation that "the movie actor, like the sacred king of primitive tribes, is a god in captivity".
    • Douglas R. Suisman ( 1989), Los Angeles boulevard: eight x-rays of the body public. p. 39
  • When Alexander Chase wrote, "To understand is to forgive, even oneself," he summarized much of what has been learned about forgiveness through the ages. Forgiveness requires at least a bit of understanding, sometimes quite a bit.
    • Robert J. Furey (1993), The joy of kindness. p. 81