Charles-François Daubigny

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Charles-François Daubigny (15 February 1817 – 19 February 1878) was a leading landscape painter of the French Barbizon school, and anticipates the plein-air innovations of Impressionism

Quotes of Charles-François Daubigny[edit]

  • My travelling companion [= Corot] has just abandoned me. He's a perfect Father Joy, this Father Corot. He is altogether a wonderful man, who mixes jokes in with his very good advice
    • In his letter of 1852; as quoted in Corot, Gary Tinterow, Michael Pantazzi, Vincent Pomarède - Galeries nationales du Grand Palais (France), National Gallery of Canada, Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.), 1996, p.271 – note 62
    • Corot's relationship with Daubigny was by far his most important friendship with another artist, during the 1860-70's
  • Speak to me no more of the old masters. Not one of them can stand up to this sturdy fellow [=Courbet ].
    • Quote c. 1860, in Corot', Gary Tinterow, Michael Pantazzi, Vincent Pomarède - Galeries nationales du Grand Palais (France), National Gallery of Canada, Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.), 1996, p. 272 – quote 65
  • I have bought at Auverse thirty perches of land, all covered with beans, on which I shall plant some legs of mutton when you come to see me. They are building me a studio there, some eight by six meters, with several rooms around it, which will serve me, I hope, next Spring [of 1861]. Father Corot has found Auvers very fine, and has engaged me to fix myself there for a part of the year, wishing to make rustic landscapes with figures. I shall be truly well of there, in the midst of a good farming country, where the ploughs do not yet go by steam.
    • In a letter to his friend Frédéric Henriet[1], 1860; as quoted in ‘Charles-francois Daubigny’, by Robert J. Wichenden, in The Century Illustrated Montly Magazine, Vol. XLIV, July 1892, p. 335
    • Daubigny bought property in Auvers-sur-Oise in 1860; four years later Corot would decorate there his Villa des Vallées, with beautiful murals.
  • [I] preferred paintings full of daring to the nullities welcomed into every Salon.
    • Quote c. 1865, in Corot', Gary Tinterow, Michael Pantazzi, Vincent Pomarède - Galeries nationales du Grand Palais (France), National Gallery of Canada, Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.), 1996, p. 272 – quote 65
    • Daubigny's work was frequently refused by the jury of the Salon; after c. 1865 he participated in the jury himself, often together with Corot.
  • I was not able to work in the several excursions and ascensions made in the neighborhood, where it was very beautiful. One is so surprised by these grand aspects that it would be necessary to remain a long time before finding the interpretation capable of rendering them. I am going to finish the season at Auvers. There is nothing like one’s natural every-day surroundings where one really takes pleasure. The pictures we do then feel the effect of their home-life, and the sweet sensations we experience in it.
    • In a letter to his friend Frédéric Henriet, 1872; as quoted in ‘Charles-francois Daubigny’, by Robert J. Wichenden, in The Century Illustrated Montly Magazine, Vol. XLIV, July 1892, p. 337

Quotes about Charles-François Daubigny[edit]

  • Mr. Daubigny is again to be found among the new landscapist group. I do not know anyone who was a more intimate feeling for nature, and who can better make it felt [in his former paintings]. But why does he only produce [now] rough sketches like 'La Moisson' and the 'Vue Pris sur les Bords de la Seine'. This latter is particularly beautiful. Is Mr. Daubigny afraid if ruining his work by finishing it? But that would be an avowal of weakness. I have a better opinion of his talent and I am convinced that a man who has begun so well could not finish badly
    • art-critic after The Salon of 1852; as quoted in Corot, Gary Tinterow, Michael Pantazzi, Vincent Pomarède - Galeries nationales du Grand Palais (France), National Gallery of Canada, Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.), 1996, p. 45
  • [at Charles Daubigny's place where] ..animated conversations on the direct study of nature or the comparative merits of Haarlem paint driers and thick oil paints were often interrupted bu bursts of merriment greeting a witticism of one of the guests, who included non other than Corot, Daumier, Geoffroy-Dechaume, etc...
    • Felix Braquemond, remembering his Paris evenings around 1854; as quoted in Corot, Gary Tinterow, Michael Pantazzi, Vincent Pomarède - Galeries nationales du Grand Palais (France), National Gallery of Canada, Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.), 1996, p. 150 – note 43
  • Those were the times when Les Vallées [Auverse] were full of life. Monsieur Daubigny would go off on the plain in the early morning, work an hour or two, and then start for he river. Sometimes he would come to draw my donkey or have some rabbits let loose in the kitchen here to sketch from. I always attended to his garden in which he was very much interested.
    • Ferdinand Gulpin, the old gardener of Daubigny in Auvers-sur-Oise, interviewed in 1892 by Robert J. Wichenden, and quoted in his article 'Charles-francois Daubigny' in 'The Century Illustrated Montly Magazine', Vol. XLIV, July 1892, p. 333

External links[edit]

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