Distrust

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Distrust is an active lack of trust in someone or something, leading to wariness of the subject.

Sourced[edit]

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations[edit]

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 197.
  • Usurpator diffida
    Di tutti sempre.
    • A usurper always distrusts the whole world.
    • Vittorio Alfieri, Polinice, III. 2.
  • What loneliness is more lonely than distrust?
  • When desperate ills demand a speedy cure,
    Distrust is cowardice, and prudence folly.
  • A certain amount of distrust is wholesome, but not so much of others as of ourselves; neither vanity nor conceit can exist in the same atmosphere with it.
  • Three things a wise man will not trust,
    The wind, the sunshine of an April day,
    And woman's plighted faith.

Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895)[edit]

Quotes reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895).
  • When you have overcome one temptation, you must be ready to enter the lists with another. As distrust, in some sense, is the mother of safety, so security is the gate of danger. A man had need to fear this most of all, that he fears not at all.

External links[edit]

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