Donald in Mathmagic Land

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Donald in Mathmagic Land is an Academy Award nominated Donald Duck featurette, released on June 26, 1959. It was directed by Hamilton Luske and is 27 minutes in length. Donald In Mathmagic Land founded on VHS by Walt Disney Mini Classics.

Sourced[edit]

Donald Duck[edit]

  • Mighty strange.
  • Ha! That's an odd-looking creature.
  • What kind of a crazy place is this?
  • Well, what do you know! Square roots!
  • Huh? [Echoing] Hello!
  • That's me! Where am I?
  • Mathamagic Land? Never heard of it.
  • Well, who are you?
  • That's for me. What's next?
  • Mathematics? That's for eggheads.
  • Yeah.
  • Aww!
  • Pythagoras?
  • Mathematics in music?
  • Oh, goody! You do find mathematics in the goodness gracious.
  • What's going on?
  • Give me something with a beat.
  • Pythag, old boy. Put it there.
  • Well, I'll be a gosh-darn egghead.
  • Boy! Oh, boy, oh, boy! This is mathematics! I get mathematical figures like that!
  • Let me try it.
  • Ideal proportion.
  • Oh, yeah? [Grunting] There. I knew I could do it.
  • Gee Mr Spirit! There's a lot more to mathematics than 2 times 2.
  • Games? Oh, boy!
  • Checkers?
  • Chess?
  • Ain't no pawn! I'm Donald Duck!
  • Alice?
  • Hey, Mr. Spirit! Help, help, help!
  • Oh, whew. That was close.
  • That's very interesting. What's next?
  • Oh, boy!
  • What's next? Tiddlywinks?
  • Oh, boy! That's for me!
  • Of course! The cue ball has to hit the other 2 balls, like this!
  • 3 cushion?
  • Wow! That was a lucky shot!
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7!
  • That's amazing! How does he do it?
  • [Laughing] He missed it! [Laughing]
  • What's so mathematical about that?
  • Very confusing, isn't it?
  • There's nothing to it! Let me try!
  • Let's see now. If I hit it here, hit it'll bounce there, and uh--no, here. If I hit it here... 4 and a 1/2 minus 3. 3 and a half plus 4. Add the 2. [Mumbling] Divided it to, uh, to, uh... I guess I should shoot about here.
  • Uh, 1 and a 1/2!
  • Hey, it works! Oh, boy! It's a cinch! [Mumbling]
  • How do you like for mathematics, Mr. Spirit?
  • A ball!
  • A magnifying glass!
  • A-- A wheel!
  • Cone!
  • I'll be dog-goned! I've never seen so many doors before.
  • Hey! Hey! What's the matter with these doors? Hey! These doors won't open! They're locked!
  • Mathematics!

Spirit[edit]

  • Hello, Donald.
  • And without mathematics we couldn't even keep score.
    • Describing the presence of mathematics in baseball.
  • Football is played on a rectangle divided by yard lines.
    • Donald plays football game.
  • Basketball is game of circles, spheres, and rectangles.
    • Donald dribbles like bouncing the ball.
  • Well we can't all be mathematically perfect.
  • "Everything is arranged according to mathematical number and shape."
  • The Pythagoras discovered that the octave had a ratio 2 to 1.
  • So, from these eggheads, the Pythagoreans, with their mathematical formula, came the bases of our music of today.
  • It was our old friend, Pythagoras who discovered that the pentagram was full of mathemagic.
  • But this is only the beginning, hidden within the pentagram is a star for creating a golden rectangle which the Greeks admire for its beautiful proportions and magic qualities.
  • The star contains the golden rectangle many times over.
  • It's a most remarkable shape.
  • This figure also contains a magic spiral that repeats the proportions of the golden section into infinity.
  • We find it in their classical architecture: the parthenon.
  • The cathedral of Notre Dame is an outstanding example.
  • Today, the golden rectangle is very much apart of our modern world.
  • Modern painters have rediscovered the magic of proportions.
  • Now, that you're all pent up in a pentagon, let's see how nature uses it's same mathematical form. The petunia. The Star Jasmine. The starfish. The wax flower. There are literally thousands of members and good standing, and natures pythagorians suicide of the star.
  • All nature's works have a mathematical logic and her patterns are limitless.
  • The magic proportions of the golden section are often found in the spirals of nature's designs.
  • The prefusion of mathematical forms brings to mind the words of Pythagoras.
  • Yes, there is mathematics in music in our art, and just about everything, and as the Greeks had guessed, the rules are always the same.
  • Well, Donald, did you enjoy your geometrical journey?
  • Let's begin with the game that's played on squares.
  • No. Chess.
  • A mathematical contest between 2 minds.
  • It's a game that is been enjoyed the centers by Kings and Commoners.
  • In fact, Louis Carol, a famous mathematician the literary mind used chess as a setting for his classic tale through the looking glass.
  • Alice. Found herself face to face with line to friendly group of chess pieces.
  • Now you can look at this game from a safer prespective.
  • Chess is a game of caculated strategy.
  • And since the board is geometrical, the moves are mathematical.
  • Checkmate, and the game is over.
  • Even hopscotch has its multiple squares.
    • Donald hops on hopscotch on one leg.
  • No. A mathematical game played on 2 perfect squares using 3 perfect spheres and a lot of diamonds.
  • In other words, billiards.
  • Now, let's see how an expert of 3 cushion billiards uses his head.
  • Yes. The cue ball has to hit both the other balls, but it must contact at least 3 cushions before it hits the final ball.
  • 1, 2, 3.
  • 1, 2, 3.
  • It takes an expert to make several shots of succession.
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.
  • Luck? No. It's skill.
  • For this game, you have to know all the angles.
  • First, there's technique. He's striking the cue ball low, so it'll spin backwards.
  • Hitting the ball on the right side, it will make it tug the rail.
  • These trick shots take a lot of practice.
  • 1, 2, 3.
  • Oh, this game takes precise calculation.
  • He figures out how each shot in his head.
  • He could play it like this, but it calls quite a bit of luck.
  • There is a better choice.
  • For this, he uses the diamond markings on the rail as a mathematical guide.
  • First he figures the natural angle for hitting the object balls, and then he finds at his cue ball must bounce off the number 3 diamond.
  • Next, he gets ready for the shot and he needs the number for his cue position.
  • This cause for a different set of numbers.
  • Not when you get the hang of it.
  • You see the cue position is 4.
  • Now simple subtraction: 3 from 4 is 1.
  • So he shoots for the first diamond.
  • He should make it.
  • It's called playing a diamond system.
  • Natural angle 2.
  • Cue position.
  • 1 and a 1/2 2, 2 and a 1/2 3, 3 and a 1/2.
  • 2 from 3 and a 1/2 is 1 and a 1/2.
  • So, shoot halfway between the first and second diamonds.
  • No, no, Donald.
  • There's no guesswork to mathematics.
  • It's quite simple.
  • Natural angle for the hit. 2.
  • Cue position.
  • 3 and a 1/2.
  • How much is 3 and a 1/2 minus 2?
  • You're making it tough for yourself, Donald.
  • Wonderful, Donald. And now you're ready for the most exciting game of all.
  • And the playing field for this game is in the mind.
  • Uh-oh. Look at the condition of your mind.
  • "Antiquated ideas. Bungling. False concepts. Superstitions. Confusion."
  • To think straight we'll have to clean house.
  • There. That's more like it.
  • A nice clean sweep.
  • This game is played with circles and triangles.
  • Think of a perfect circle.
  • A perfect circle. Perfect circle. Perfect.
  • Ahh, put a triangle inside, and turn it.
  • Now, spin the circle, and what have you got?
  • Yes, a sphere.
  • The shape of things is first discovered in the mind.
  • Slice off the top, and we have a--
  • A lens is a section of a sphere.
  • All optical instruments are created through mathematics.
  • You see, there's a lot more to mathematics than just numbers and equations.
  • Let's get back to our circle and triangle.
  • Roll it, and we have a--
  • The circle has been the basis for many of man's important adventures. [Propellers Running]
  • The mind can create the most amazing things.
  • If we spin the triangle, we have a--
  • Slice the cone.
  • The cone is full of useful mathematical shapes.
  • The orbits of all planets and satellites can be found in the cone.
  • No matter how you slice it, it's always mathematics.
  • A slice like this, gives us the reflector of a searchlight.
  • A slice like this, the mirror of a giant telescope.
  • A line on the cone, and we have a drill. And a spring. [Boinging] [3x]
  • Now, you're ticking.
  • The mind is the birthplace for all of man's scientific achievements.
  • Think of a pentagram, Donald.
  • Now, put another inside, a third, and a fourth. No pencil is sharp enough to draw enough as fine as you can think. And no paper large enough to hold your imagination. In fact, it is only in the minds that we can conceive infinity. Mathematical thinking has opened the doors to the exciting adventures of science.
  • Each discovery leads to many others, an endless chain.
  • Of course, there are. These are the doors of the future... and the key is--

Other[edit]

  • Pi is equal to 3 point 141592653589747 Et Cetra, Et Cetera, Et Cetra.
    • Pi Creature at the beginning of the film.
  • Good heavens, what's this?
    • Chess Queen with quote.
  • Upon my soul, it appears to be a lost pawn!
    • Chess King with quote.
  • He says, "He's Donald Duck!"
    • Chess Queen with quote.
  • Preposterous!
    • Chess King with quote.
  • Or it could be an Alice.
    • Chess Queen with quote.
  • No, no, no! It's a lost pawn!
    • Chess King with quote.
  • Lost pawn? Stop that pawn!
    • Chess Queen with quote.
  • Number, please.
    • Telephone operator with quote.
  • In the words of Galileo, "Mathematics is the alphabet with which God has written the universe."
    • Galileo, quoted at the end of the film.
  • They used to meet in secret to discuss their mathematical discoveries. Only members were allowed to attend. They had a secret emblem: the pentagram.
    • A mighty strange voice (distinctly different from Donald Duck and The Spirit of Adventure) heard in some versions of the film after the "secret handshake." This voice may refer to any number of ancient sources such as the voice Nostradamus heard and wrote of in his Preface to Cesar.
  • Let's see what the topic is for today.
  • Shh, it's a jam secion.
  • Shh.

Cast[edit]

  • Clarence Nash - Donald Duck (voice)
  • Paul Frees - The True Spirit of Adventure/Narrator (male voice), and the Pi creature (voice)
  • Unknown - The billiards player, the Chess King (voice), and the Chess Queen (voice)

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
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Donald in Mathmagic Land quotes at the Internet Movie Database