Familiarity

From Wikiquote
Jump to: navigation, search

Quotes about familiarity.

Quotes[edit]

  • Toji: Hmm, Misato is just so cool.
Shinji: Yeah I used to think so too, but she's such a slob, she's always embarrassing me and she never does anything but lie around the house. She's not embarrassed about it, but I am.
Kensuke: You're a lucky guy.
Shinji: What do you mean?
Kensuke: Ikari really is just a kid, now isn't he?
Toji: He sure is.
Shinji: Meaning what?
Kensuke: You get to see the true side of her that she doesn't allow us to see. That's very much like a family. (Shinji pauses then realizes the truth of what Kensuke has said, and walks home smiling)
  • A metaphor is a word used in an unfamiliar context to give us a new insight; a good metaphor moves us to see our ordinary world in an extraordinary way.
  • Quite generally, the familiar, just because it is familiar, is not cognitively understood. The commonest way in which we deceive either ourselves or others about understanding is by assuming something as familiar, and accepting it on that account; with all its pros and cons, such knowing never gets anywhere, and it knows not why. Subject and object, God, Nature , Understanding, sensibility, and so on, are uncritically taken for granted as familiar, established as valid and made into fixed points for starting and stopping. While these remain unmoved, the knowing activity goes back and forth between them, thus moving only on their surface.
  • "Familiarity is a magician that is cruel to beauty but kind to ugliness."
    • Ouida (pseudonym of Marie Louise De La Ramee), Princess Napraxine (1906) p. 19.
  • "Familiar acts are beautiful through love."
    • Percy Bysshe Shelley, "Prometheus Unbound" in The Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley (1839) p. 123.
  • "Familiarity is the thing -- the sense of belonging. It grants exemption from all evil, all shabbiness"

Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations[edit]

Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 259-60.
  • Quod crebro videt non miratur, etiamsi cur fiat nescit. Quod ante non vidit, id si evenerit, ostentum esse censet.
    • A man does not wonder at what he sees frequently, even though he be ignorant of the reason. If anything happens which he has not seen before, he calls it a prodigy.
    • Cicero, De Divinatione, II. 22.
  • I hold he loves me best that calls me Tom.
  • Staled by frequence, shrunk by usage into commonest commonplace!

External links[edit]