Frances Cornford

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Frances Crofts Cornford (née Darwin; 30 March 188619 August 1960) was an English poet in the Georgian tradition. She belonged to the Darwin-Wedgwood family.

Sourced[edit]

  • A young Apollo, golden-haired,
    Stands dreaming on the verge of strife,
    Magnificently unprepared
    For the long littleness of life.
    • "Youth", line 1; from Poems (Hampstead: Priory Press, 1910) p. 15.
    • On Rupert Brooke.
  • O why do you walk through the fields in gloves,
    Missing so much and so much?
    O fat white woman whom nobody loves,
    Why do you walk through the fields in gloves,
    When the grass is soft as the breast of doves
    And shivering-sweet to the touch?
    O why do you walk through the fields in gloves,
    Missing so much and so much?
    • "To a Fat Lady Seen from the Train", from Poems (Hampstead: Priory Press, 1910) p. 20.
  • Whoso maintains that I am humbled now
    (Who wait the Awful Day) is still a liar;
    I hope to meet my Maker brow to brow
    And find my own the higher.
    • "Epitaph for a Reviewer", line 1; from Collected Poems (London: Cresset Press, 1954) p. 112.

External links[edit]

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