Franz Rosenzweig

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Philosophy takes it upon itself to throw off the fear of things earthly, to rob death of its poisonous sting.

Franz Rosenzweig (December 25, 1886December 10, 1929) was a Jewish theologian and philosopher.

Quotes[edit]

  • Philosophy takes it upon itself to throw off the fear of things earthly, to rob death of its poisonous sting.
    • The Star of Redemption (1921), p. 3.
  • Cognition is autonomous; it refuses to have any answers foisted on it from the outside. Yet it suffers without protest having certain questions prescribed to it from the outside (and it is here that my heresy regarding the unwritten law of the university originates). Not every question seems to me worth asking. Scientific curiosity and omnivorous aesthetic appetite mean equally little to me today, though I was once under the spell of both, particularly the latter. Now I only inquire when I find myself inquired of. Inquired of, that is, by men rather than by scholars. There is a man in each scholar, a man who inquires and stands in need of answers. I am anxious to answer the scholar qua man but not the representative of a certain discipline, that insatiable, ever inquisitive phantom which like a vampire drains whom it possesses of his humanity.
    • in Franz Rosenzweig: His Life and Thought (1961/1998), p. 97

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