Henry J. Heinz

From Wikiquote
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Henry John Heinz in 1917.

Henry John Heinz (October 11, 1844 – May 14, 1919) was an American businessman who founded the H. J. Heinz Company. Heinz Field.

Quotes[edit]

  • I feel very sad, as though I had not a friend in the world.... A man is nowhere without money.... People care little about you without money.... People talk terribly. We find that we have but few friends left ... I feel sad and constantly worried. People as much as say we have money. It is hard to bear .
    • Henry J. Heinz in his diary (1875), cited in: Robert C. Alberts (1973), The good provider: H. J. Heinz and his 57 varieties. p. 24
  • Make all you can honestly ; save all you can prudently ; give all you can wisely.
    • Attributed to Henry J. Heinz in: James Burnley (1901), Millionaires and Kings of Enterprise: : The Marvellous Careers of Some Americans who by Pluck, Foresight, and Energy Have Made Themselves Masters in the Fields of Industry and Finance. p. 327
  • A wide market awaited the manufacturer of food products who would set purity and quality above everything else in their preparation.
    • Attributed to Henry J. Heinz in: J. N. Garfunkel (1910), The American Pure Food and Health Journal. Vol. 2 p. xxxviii
  • To do a common thing uncommonly well brings success.
    • Henry J. Heinz, cited in: John Woolf Jordan (1915). Genealogical and Personal History of Western Pennsylvania. p. 38
  • It is neither capital nor labor but management that brings success, since management will attract capital, and capital can employ labor.
    • Henry J. Heinz, cited in: John Woolf Jordan (1915). Genealogical and Personal History of Western Pennsylvania. p. 38

Quotes about Henry J. Heinz[edit]

  • Henry J. Heinz is a man who conducts his business on terms alike to employer and employed. He finds his remuneration, not in the acquisition of dollars and cents, but in the satisfaction of seeing those who co-operate loyally and enthusiastically in producing a business success enjoying the fruits of that success. Mr. Heinz has never taken unto himself the credit for the accomplishments of his business. He has always given large credit to his associates, training them to believe in and rely upon two principles of business, which he has expressed in these words : "To do a common thing uncommonly well brings success" and "It is neither capital nor labor but management that brings success, since management will attract capital, and capital can employ labor."
    • John Woolf Jordan (1915). Genealogical and Personal History of Western Pennsylvania. p. 38
  • Its origin was in 1896. Mr Heinz, while in an elevated railroad train in New York, saw among the car-advertising cards one about shoes with the expression: ‘21 Styles’. It set him to thinking, and as he told it: ‘I said to myself, “we do not have styles of products, but we do have varieties of products.” Counting up how many we had, I counted well beyond 57, but “57” kept coming back into my mind. “Seven, seven”—there are so many illustrations of the psychological influence of that figure and of its alluring significance to people of all ages and races that “58 Varieties” or “59 Varieties” did not appeal at all to me as being equally strong. I got off the train immediately, went down to the lithographers, where I designed a street-car card and had it distributed throughout the United States. I myself did not realize how highly successful a slogan it was going to be.
    • E.D.McCafferty, Henry J.Heinz: A Biography, New York: Bartlett Orr Press, 1923, p. 147; cited in: Morgen Witzel, Fifty key figures in management. Routledge, 2004. p. 140
    • Witzel summarized that this was "story of how the Heinz 57 Varieties brand was conceived is best told by Heinz himself, relayed by one of his close associates, E.D. McCafferty."

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about: