Jeffrey Montgomery

From Wikiquote
Jump to: navigation, search
Jeffrey Montgomery as executive director of the Triangle Foundation.

Jeffrey Montgomery (May 9, 1953July 18, 2016) was an American lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender activist, and public relations professional.

Quotes[edit]

  • What kind of a society is this where a person can’t express attraction without fearing that they’re going to be murdered for it? If the person who came out with the secret was a Jewish woman or a black woman or an Asian woman, and he went over to her house the next day and killed her because he was so repulsed and she had embarrassed him that way on national television, nobody would be writing stories on the TV show’s responsibility. Everyone would be writing stories about this racist, this anti-Semite.
  • Pat Buchanan is a walking, living, breathing hate crime waiting to happen.
    • Commenting on candidate for President of the United States, Pat Buchanan, Detroit Free Press, March 16, 1996 Jennifer Juarez Robles (March 16, 1996). "Gay vote turns to Clinton". DetroitFree Press: p. 3A. Retrieved on July 20, 2016. 
  • Buchanan is worse than a child playing with matches because he understands the dangerous impact of what he says.
    • Commenting on candidate for President of the United States, Pat Buchanan, The Detroit News, March 17, 1996 Hornbeck, Mark; Cain, Charlie; Willing, Richard (March 17, 1996). "Fiery Buchanan preaches to converted in Clawson". The Detroit News: p. 9A. Retrieved on July 20, 2016. 
  • It's going to be a heartbreaking moment for these couples, to come face to face with this discrimination against them.
    • Commenting on couples trying to get same-sex marriage licenses in Michigan in 2004, Associated Press, March 4, 2004 Irwin, Jim (March 4, 2004). "Gay couples are denied marriage licenses in Detroit". Argus-Press. Associated Press. Retrieved on July 19, 2016. 
  • We think this issue needs to matter to anyone who believes in true equal opportunity and justice. If we learned anything from our experience with the Proposal 2 battle, it's that these attempts to allow discrimination in Michigan must be stopped and a united effort by many communities is the only hope to stop them.
  • This guy looks pretty gay to me. I'm willing to believe they didn't intend it to be a gay man, but I don't believe they're shocked someone would draw that conclusion.
    • Commenting to media on an advertisement from a automobile manufacturer
  • John Ashcroft is not a friend of liberty and justice. George Bush, the appointed president, is not someone who ---prior to a month ago--- ever demonstrated any insight or acuity about the world around him. Have these men been born again, again?
    • Commenting on then United States Attorney General John Ashcroft and United States President George W. Bush

America...You Kill Me[edit]

From America...You Kill Me (2000)

  • And let's not make any mistake, or gloss over that fact: Gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people are at risk every day of their lives. Not only are we the group most at risk of violence, we are most at risk of job discrimination, losing our families; homophobia retains its title as the last socially acceptable form of bigotry.
  • “Gay panic” is insidious. It appeals to juries, who are allegedly made up of random members of the community. What defense lawyers know is that most people are repulsed by the idea of gay —especially gay male— sex. Those lawyers know that a claim of defense against an alleged gay sexual advance will win points with the jury of peers.
  • GLBT people across this country only want equality and to be left alone, left to pursue our dreams and aspirations and our part of the American promise, which should be our birthright.
  • We can not live as disposable people. The broader community, which has firmly established compulsory heterosexuality as the law of the universe, has to get over its problem with us.
  • Anti-GLBT sentiment is a primary tool for organizing the far-right and it is stronger then ever as a means to split communities and reinforce constituencies.
  • While it is all too true that there is no single monolithic voice or unified agreement about what it means to be GLBT-identified, this “GLBT community” has been able to unite behind some basic consensus of what we need to achieve in order to claim the right of full citizenship.
  • Is it any wonder that those who attack us feel they have a license to do so? A license to kill? Police won't investigate. Juries won't convict. The public still thinks our lives are a political issue, defined by the mythic "Gay Agenda."
  • We want to be able to move freely and safely in our daily lives, free from the threat of random hate violence.themselves by turning the Constitution on its head and claim protection and permission to demonize and denigrate us. Hiding behind the perversion of the concepts of religious freedom and political speech, those people have carved out a special right to impose their bigotry and hatred for us.
  • America… You Kill Me! America kills all of us.
  • Our call to people of goodwill and justice, and especially to all gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender people, and those who support and love us —our allies in the fight for liberty and justice for all— is to take action.
  • As new generations of activists come forward with new ideas and sensibilities; as the political landscape evolves and changes; as new technologies are born and developed; and as the mercurial focus of issues present new concerns and dangers… Our strength, creativity, harnessed rage and effective activism will remain constant and be the root source of our salvation in the future.
  • Matthew Shepard should be a symbol. But it misses the point if it ends only with legislation. It misses the point if it’s about mere tolerance.
  • Matt’s murder is a parable for our times. It tells of what happens to the conscience of the country when it fails to be free for all and accord every person dignity. How we consume and destroy our children…our future.
  • We want to be able to freely associate, without fear that our privacy, including the privacy of our intimate consensual relations, will be compromised by intrusive and abusive selective enforcement of laws or moral codes.
    We want to be able to live with the person we choose in legally sanctioned arrangements or marriage, to be able to build and maintain families and raise children, with the full protections and benefits that attain to those relationships.
    We want GLBT youth to have access to safe and inclusive education experiences, in both public and private educational institutions, no longer dispirited by judgmental, prejudicial systems that contribute to low self-esteem and leave them at risk. These are the basic rights and expectations yet to be achieved for GLBT people in this land of the free.
  • But the cards are stacked against us. Scurrilous and abusive rhetoric is spewed by politicians and so-called religious leaders, who cloak themselves by turning the Constitution on its head and claim protection and permission to demonize and denigrate us. Hiding behind the perversion of the concepts of religious freedom and political speech, those people have carved out a special right to impose their bigotry and hatred for us.

Quotes about Jeffrey Montgomery[edit]

  • I know many words will doubtless be written about Jeff, but none can convey the depth of loss – personal loss and loss to our movements – felt at Jeff’s death. Jeff was a brilliant strategist, a remarkable teacher, a powerful leader, and, above all, my friend. For all the ferocity of his refusal to let others suffer harm, Jeff was a gentle soul. He cared deeply for those he served for so long, speaking out for human rights for almost three decades through his advocacy against violence, homelessness, HIV, and the recognition of the diversity of family, sex and sexuality.
    Every word spoken for freedom, every statement demanding human rights – the right to love as we wish and be who we are – will forever summon Jeff to our minds and hearts. Our hearts go out to all the members of his family, and that includes the hundreds and thousands of lives made better because Jeff lived and because Jeff cared enough to create the change he wanted to see.
  • LGBT Detroit is deeply saddened by the loss of Jeffrey Montgomery, a friend who I passionately refer to as Jeff. Jeff was a monumental force in the advocacy and safety of LGBTQ Detroiters, Michiganders, and Americans as a whole. His work on behalf of those who were affected by violence and profiling improved the quality of life for many LGBTQ people. Jeff will be remembered for his tireless compassion for others, as well as his passion to advance the lives of many. We will remember Jeff through many avenues, including the work that continues to be done by our sister partner, Equality Michigan. Jeff was an inspiration to myself and many others; we lost a large figure in the movement for the equality of LGBTQ people. He will be missed immensely.
  • I met Jeff when I was coming into the LGBT equality movement as a young activist. I was impressed with his passion and dedication. He introduced me to so many folks who I continue to work with and call friends.
    Jeff will be missed. The movement lost a champion who helped lay the foundation on which many of our achievements are now built.
  • I'm so sorry to hear of Jeff's passing. He laid the groundwork in so many ways for the LGBTQ advocacy taking place across Michigan still today. He will be missed by many, though his legacy will live on through those he inspired throughout his life.
  • No other local activist for LGBTQ rights and sexual freedom from the past twenty-five years has had the potent impact on our history as Jeffrey Montgomery.
    • Tim Retzloff, a professor at Michigan State University who has studied the LGBT rights movement in Michigan. Heywood, Todd (July 20, 2016). "Jeffrey Montgomery, LGBTQ Leader Dies at 63". Between the Lines. Retrieved on 2016-07-20. 
  • His unflagging devotion to queer justice and social justice will be a model for generations to come.
    • Tim Retzloff, a professor at Michigan State University who has studied the LGBT rights movement in Michigan. Heywood, Todd (July 20, 2016). "Jeffrey Montgomery, LGBTQ Leader Dies at 63". Between the Lines. Retrieved on 2016-07-20. 

External links[edit]