Job security

From Wikiquote
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Job security is the probability that an individual will keep his or her job; a job with a high level of job security is such that a person with the job would have a small chance of becoming unemployed.

Quotes[edit]

  • Virtually every modern industrial nation has faced issues of job security, whether they have faced these issues realistically or unrealistically, successfully or unsuccessfully. In some countries— France, Germany, India, and South Africa, for example— job security laws make it difficult and costly for a private employer to fire anyone. Labor unions try to have job security policies in many industries and in many countries around the world. Teachers’ unions in the United States are so successful at this that it can easily cost a school district tens of thousands of dollars— or more than a hundred thousand in some places— to fire just one teacher, even if that teacher is grossly incompetent.
    • Thomas Sowell, Basic Economics, 4th ed. (2010), Ch. 10 Controlled Labor Market
  • The obvious purpose of job security laws is to reduce unemployment but that is very different from saying that this is their actual effect. Countries with such laws typically do not have lower unemployment rates, but instead have higher unemployment rates, than countries without widespread job protection laws. In France, which has some of Europe’s strongest job security.
    • Thomas Sowell, Basic Economics, 4th ed. (2010), Ch. 10 Controlled Labor Market
  • The very thing that makes a modern industrial society so efficient and so effective in raising living standards— the constant quest for newer and better ways of getting work done and more goods produced— makes it impossible to keep on having the same workers doing the same jobs in the same way.
    • Thomas Sowell, Basic Economics, 4th ed. (2010), Ch. 10 Controlled Labor Market
  • The connection between job security laws and unemployment has been understood by some officials but apparently not by much of the public, including the educated public. When France tried to deal with its high youth unemployment rate of 23 percent by easing its stringent job security laws for people on their first job, students at the Sorbonne and other French universities rioted in Paris and other cities across the country in 2006.
    • Thomas Sowell, Basic Economics, 4th ed. (2010), Ch. 10 Controlled Labor Market

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about: