Margaret Junkin Preston

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Margaret Junkin Preston (1820–1897) was an American poet and author remembered for espousing the Confederacy in her poems.

Sourced[edit]

  • White as the blossoms which the almond tree,
    Above its bald and leafless branches bears.
    • The Royal Preacher, Stanza 5, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 19.
  • The lotos bowed above the tide and dreamed.
    • Rhodope's Sandal, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 463.
  • The pure memories given
    To help our joy on earth, when earth is past,
    Shall help our joy in heaven.
    • Reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 407.
  • With guilt's defilement stained, without, within,
    How may I hope Thy cleansing grace to win?
    Because Thou saidst, "I have forgiven thy sin."
    • Reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 87.
  • Pain is no longer pain when it is past.
    • Old Songs and New. Nature's Lesson, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 575.
  • Gracious as sunshine, sweet as dew
    Shut in a lily's golden core.
    • Agnes, reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 458.

External links[edit]

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