Margrit Kennedy

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Instead of paying interest to those who have more money than they need and in order to keep money in circulation, people should pay a small fee if they keep the money out of circulation.

Margrit Kennedy (born 21 November 1939, in Chemnitz) is a German architect, professor, environmentalist, author and an advocate of complementary currencies and an interest and inflation-free economy.

Sourced[edit]

Interest and Inflation Free Money[edit]

  • It takes some audacity for a non-economist to write a book about economics, especially if the book deals with one of the yardsticks of the profession, i.e., money.
    • Introduction, p. 13
  • Money does not only help the exchange of goods and services but can also hinder the exchange of goods and services by being kept in the hands of those who have more than they need. Thus it creates a private toll gate where those who have less than they need pay a fee to those who more money than they need.
    • Chapter One, Four Basic Misconceptions About Money, p. 17-18
  • Instead of paying interest to those who have more money than they need and in order to keep money in circulation, people should pay a small fee if they keep the money out of circulation.
    • Chapter Two, Creating an Interest and Inflation Free Money, p. 37 (See also: Wörgl Austria.)
  • As soon as interest is abolished, inflation becomes unnecessary...
    • Chapter Two, Creating an Interest and Inflation Free Money, p. 41
  • In the new money system we abolish interest and inflation, thereby reducing the prices of all goods and services as well as taxes by about 40%.
    • Chapter Three, Who Would Profit From a New Monetary System?, p. 66
  • As time goes on, those who think that they live in democracies will live at best, in oligarchy or at worst under fascist regimes. In medieval times, people thought they were badly off when they paid tithes; a tenth of their income or produce to the feudal land lord. In this respect, they were better off than we are nowadays. Today more than one third of DM or dollar goes to service capital. Those who gain most are the super rich, multinationals, big insurance companies and banks.
    • Chapter Three, Who Would Profit From a New Monetary System?, p. 67
  • The absurdity of monetary system which robs people first of their fair share in the "free market economy" and then - through some of the most inefficient procedures imaginable - returns some of this money in the form of welfare payments to the same people, has rarely been exposed by the "experts" nor been discussed in public.
    • Chapter Three, Who Would Profit From a New Monetary System?, p. 71
  • The historic opportunity now is to present an interest free economy as a third type of solution which is to be found neither in communism nor in capitalism but transcends both.
    • Chapter Three, Who Would Profit From a New Monetary System?, p. 76
  • Women overwhelmingly carry the load of the economic chaos and social misery caused by the present money system everywhere in the world.
    • Chapter Three, Who Would Profit From a New Monetary System?, p. 84
  • The monetary system we have inherited is more than 2,000 years old.
    • Chapter Four, Some lessons From History, p. 89
The monetary system we have inherited is more than 2,000 years old.
  • Social justice, ecological survival and freedom are threatened where we allow the proliferation of societal structures which in themselves tend to work against these goals.
    • Chapter Five, Money Reform & Global Transformation, p. 98
  • Be aware that money is one of the central issues to many people's lives. Therefore, it is linked strongly with people's perception of themselves and the world. Generosity or greed, openness or isolation, warmth or coldness - how people behave in other areas will be reflected in their attitude towards money.
    • Chapter Six, What Can I Do to Help in the Transition Period?, p. 108

External links[edit]

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