Nizami Ganjavi

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Nizami Ganjavi (1141–1209) was a 12th-century Persian poet.

went to the Tavern last night, but I was not admitted I was bellowing yet nobody was listening to me
Either none of the wine-sellers were awake

Quotes[edit]

  • I went to the Tavern last night, but I was not admitted
    I was bellowing yet nobody was listening to me
    Either none of the wine-sellers were awake
    Or I was a nobody, and no one opened the door for a Nobody
    When more or less half of the night had passed
    A shrewd, perfect man (rind) raised his head from a booth and showed his face
    I asked him: “to open the door”, he told me: “go away, do not talk nonsense!
    At this hour, nobody opens door for anybody
    This is not a mosque where its doors are open any moment
    Where you can come late and move quickly to the first row
    This is the Tavern of Magians and rinds dwell here
    There are Beauties, candle, wine, sugar, reed flute and songs
    Whatever wonders that exists, is present here
    (in this tavern there are) Muslims, Armenians, Zoroastrian, Nestorians, and Jews
    If you are seeking company of all that is found here
    You must become a dust upon the feet of everyone in order to reach your (spiritual perfection) goal”
    O Nezami! if you knock the ring on this door day and night
    You won't find except smoke from this burning fire [1] [2]
    • Yerevan: Victoria Arakelova, YEREVAN SERIES FOR ORIENTAL STUDIES (Editor of the Series Garnik Asatrian), p. 191
  • Alas, the wasted labour of my youth!
    Alas, the hope which vain hath proved in truth!
    I tunnelled mountain walls: behold my prize!
    My labour's wasted: here the hardship lies!
    The world is void of sun and moon for me:
    My garden lacks its box and willow tree.
    For the last time my beacon-light hath shone;
    Not Shirin, but the sun from me is gone!
    Beyond Death's portals, Shirin shall I greet,
    So with one leap, I hasten Death to meet!
    Thus to the world the mournful tale he cried,
    For Shirin kissed the ground and kissing died.
    • History of Persia, Percy Molesworth Sykes, 1915
  • Take not apart the good pearl from the string; from him who is of evil nature flee.
    An evil nature acts consistently: have you not heard that Nature does not err?
    The evil-natured man keeps faith with none; the erring nature does not fail to err.
    The scorpion since it is by nature bad—to let it live's a fault, to kill it, good.
    Seek knowledge, for through knowledge you effect that doors to you be opened and not closed.
    He who shames not at learning can draw forth pearls from the water, rubies from the rock.
    Whilst he to whom no knowledge is assigned—that person (you will find) ashamed to learn.
    How many, keen of mind, in effort slack, sell pottery from lack of pearls (to sell)!
    How many a dullard, through his being taught, becomes the chief judge of the Seven Climes!
    • Translation by Wilson

Verse to his father[edit]

  • Like as my ancestors, so did my father Yusuf, son of Zaki Muwajjad, early depart hence.
    Yet what boots it to quarrel with destiny? Fate spoke, and complaints must be hushed.
    Yet whose father died not? When I saw him depart to his fathers, I tore his image out of my heart.
    Whatever has happened to me, bitter or sweet, all I have done is to resign myself.
    • Persian Literature, translated by Claud Field

See also[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:
  1. https://archive.org/details/OnTheModernPoliticizationOfThePersianPoetNezamiGanjavi_251
  2. Yerevan: Victoria Arakelova, YEREVAN SERIES FOR ORIENTAL STUDIES (Editor of the Series Garnik Asatrian), Caucasian Centre for Iranian Studies. p. 191