Prahladpuri Temple, Multan

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Prahladpuri Temple (Urdu: پرَہْلادْپُورِی مندر‎) was a Hindu temple located in Multan city of Punjab province in Pakistan, adjacent to the Shrine of Bahauddin Zakariya. Named after Prahlada, it is dedicated to the Hindu deity Narasimha.

The temple is presently in ruins, since its destruction in 1992 by a Muslim mob in retaliation for the demolition of the Babri Masjid in Ayodhya, India and the site is currently owned by Evacuee Trust Property Board.

Quotes[edit]

  • The Hindu temple known as Prakladpuri is of great antiquity, and is mentioned in the Vedas. It is alleged to be built on the site which was the scene of the fourth incarnation of Nursinghy the half-man, half-lion avatar of Vishnu, the second person in the Hindu triad.
    • The Land of the Five Rivers and Sindh: Sketches Historical and Descriptive by David Ross [1]
  • The Hindu tradition is that a giant named Hurnakus once ruled the kingdom of Multan. Brahma promised him that he shbuld not meet his death by god, man, or beast ; neither should fate take him on the earth, in the air, in fire, or in water, by sword or bow, by night or day. Consequently he became puffed up with pride, fancied he was immortal,, and directed his subjects to pay him divine worship. The giant's son, named Prahlad, who was a devout follower of Vishnu, refused to comply with his father's behests. Incensed at this disobedience, Hurnakus resolved to kill his son, and mockingly desired to know if Vishnu the omnipresent would come to save him. The son, nothing daunted, replied that his god was " Here ! " at the same time striking with his hand one of the pillars of the palace. The pillar immediately opened, and revealed Vishnu with the head of a lion and the body of a man, who, seizing the impious Hurnakus, tore him to pieces. As this occurred in the evening, Brahma's promise is not considered to have been infringed. The temple, having been the scene of this incarnation, is held in the highest veneration by the followers of Vishnu, who is locally worshipped under the name of Nursingh.
    • The Land of the Five Rivers and Sindh: Sketches Historical and Descriptive by David Ross [2]
  • The Muhammadans erected a lofty domed tomb over the remains of a celebrated saint. Shaikh Baha- ud-din Zakiria. This tomb was built close to the temple of Prahladpuri... The close proximity of the Bahawal Hak to the Prahladpuri temple, and the desire of the Hindus to raise the spire of the latter to the same height as the Muhammadan tomb, was the cause of serious riots between the two religious sects.
    • The Land of the Five Rivers and Sindh: Sketches Historical and Descriptive by David Ross [3]
  • The Prahladpuri temple in Multan was also subjected to repeated destruction. It stood at the site of the original temple believed to have been constructed by Prahalad. It was there that the Narasimha avatar was said to have appeared out of a pillar, and saved Prahalad from his father. The festival of Hollika Dahan commenced from that site.
    • Jain, M. (2019). Flight of deities and rebirth of temples: Espisodes from Indian history.
  • The temple was wrecked several times and mosques built in its streets. The shrine of Bahawal Haqgq (Baha-ud-din Zakariya) was constructed adjacent to it. The Mughal Emperor, Shah Jahan used twelve temple pillars in the construction of a mosque. When the mosque caved in, Hindus again raised a temple at that site, and instated the image.
    • Jain, M. (2019). Flight of deities and rebirth of temples: Espisodes from Indian history.

External links[edit]

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