Seven Sages of Greece

From Wikiquote
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Mosaïc of the Seven Sages, Baalbeck, 3rd century A.D., National Museum of Beirut. Calliope at the center, and clockwise from top: Socrates, Chilon, Pittacus, Periander, Cleobulus (damaged section), Bias, Thales, and Solon.

The Seven Sages of Greece or Seven Wise Men (Greek: οἱ ἑπτὰ σοφοί hoi hepta sophoi) was the title given by classical Greek tradition to seven philosophers, statesmen, and law-givers of the 6th century BC who were renowned for their wisdom.

Quotes[edit]

  • Know thyself.
    • Inscription at the Delphic Oracle. From Plutarch, Morals
  • Hesiod might as well have kept his breath to cool his pottage.[1]
    • Periander. From Plutarch, The Banquet of th Seven Wise Men, sec. 14
  • Every one of you hath his paritcular plague, and my wife is mine; and he is very happy who hath this only.
    • Pittacus. From Plutarch, The Banquet of the Seven Wise Men, sec. 14
  • Nothing too much.
    • From Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers, bk. 1, sec. 63
  • Do not speak ill of the dead.[2]
    • From Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers, 1, 70
  • Know the right moment.[3]
    • From Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers, 1, 79
  • Rule will show the man.
    • Bias. From Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, bk. 5, ch. 1


Notes[edit]

  1. Spare your breath to cool your porridge. - François Rabelais, Works, bk. V[1552], ch. 28
  2. The Latin form: De mortuis nil nisi bonum [Of the dead, nothing but good].
  3. Occasionem cognosce.
Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about: