Six Sigma

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The common Six Sigma symbol

Six Sigma is a set of techniques and tools for business process improvement. It was introduced by engineer Bill Smith while working at Motorola in 1986. Jack Welch made it central to his business strategy at General Electric in 1995. Today, it is used in many industrial sectors


CONTENT : A - F , G - L , M - R , S - Z , See also , External links

Quotes[edit]

Quotes are arranged alphabetically by author

A - F[edit]

  • [The fundamental principle of six sigma is to] take an organization to an improved level of sigma capability through the rigorous application of statistical tools and techniques.
    • J. Antony, J.L. Escamilla and P. Caine (2003). "Lean Sigma," in: Manufacturing Engineer. 82 (4), 40–42; as cited in Kwak (2006).

G - L[edit]

  • The six sigma method is a project-driven management approach to improve the organization’s products, services, and processes by continually reducing defects in the organization. It is a business strategy that focuses on improving customer requirements understanding, business systems, productivity, and financial performance. Dating back to the mid 1980s, applications of the six sigma methods allowed many organizations to sustain their competitive advantage by integrating their knowledge of the process with statistics, engineering, and project management.
    • Young Hoon Kwak and Frank T. Anbari. "Benefits, obstacles, and future of six sigma approach." Technovation 26.5 (2006): 708-715.
  • Six Sigma is really a cultural thing—a way of behavior.
    • Alan Larson, one of the early internal Six Sigma consultants at Motorola; as cited in: Peter S. Pande, Robert P. Neuman, and Roland R. Cavanagh. The six sigma way. McGraw-Hill,, 2000. p. 8
  • Six Sigma is an organized and systematic method for strategic process improvement and new product and service development that relies on statistical methods and the scientific method to make dramatic reductions in customer defined defect rates.
    • Kevin Linderman, et al. (2003), "Six Sigma: a goal-theoretic perspective," in: Journal of Operations Management 21 (2003) p. 195

M - R[edit]

  • Six Sigma is a comprehensive and flexible system for achieving, sustaining and maximizing business success. Six Sigma is uniquely driven by close understanding and customer needs, disciplined use of facts, data, and statistical analysis, and diligent attention to managing, improving, and reinventing business process.
    • Peter S. Pande, Robert P. Neuman, and Roland R. Cavanagh. The six sigma way. McGraw-Hill,, 2000. p. xi

S - Z[edit]

  • Six Sigma has forever changed GE. Everyone—from the Six Sigma zealots emerging from their Black Belt tours, to the engineers, the auditors, and the scientists, to the senior leadership that will take this Company into the new millennium—is a true believer in Six Sigma, the way this Company now works.
    • Jack Welch, cited in: Peter S. Pande, Robert P. Neuman, and Roland R. Cavanagh. The six sigma way. McGraw-Hill,, 2000. p. 4
  • The best Six Sigma projects begin not inside the business but outside it, focused on answering the question—how can we make the customer more competitive? What is critical to the customer’s success?... One thing we have discovered with certainty is that anything we do that makes the customer more successful inevitably results in a financial return for us.
    • Jack Welch, as cited in: Peter S. Pande, Robert P. Neuman, and Roland R. Cavanagh. The six sigma way. McGraw-Hill,, 2000. p. 6

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

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