Suzanne Curchod

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Suzanne Curchod (1737 – 6 May 1794) was a French-Swiss salonist and writer. She hosted one of the most celebrated salons of the Ancien Régime. She was the wife of Jacques Necker, and is often referenced in historical documents as Madame Necker.

Sourced[edit]

  • It is never permissible to say, I say.
    • Reported in Louis Klopsch, ed., Many Thoughts of Many Minds: A Treasury of Quotations From the Literature of Every Land and Every Age (1896), p. 80.
  • Obstinacy is ever most positive when it is most in the wrong.
    • Reported in Louis Klopsch, ed., Many Thoughts of Many Minds: A Treasury of Quotations From the Literature of Every Land and Every Age (1896), p. 195.
  • How immense to us appear the sins we have not committed.
    • Reported in Louis Klopsch, ed., Many Thoughts of Many Minds: A Treasury of Quotations From the Literature of Every Land and Every Age (1896), p. 229.
  • A certain amount of distrust is wholesome, but not so much of others as of ourselves; neither vanity nor conceit can exist in the same atmosphere with it.
    • Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 197.
  • Romance is the poetry of literature.
    • Reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 676.

External links[edit]

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