Symphony No. 3 (Beethoven)

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Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, Opus 55 (also Italian Sinfonia Eroica, Heroic Symphony) is a structurally rigorous composition of great emotional depth, which marked the beginning of the creative middle-period of the composer Ludwig van Beethoven.

Quotes[edit]

First Movement

\new PianoStaff <<
    \set PianoStaff.instrumentName = #""
    \new Staff = "lower" \relative c {
  \clef bass
  \key ees \major
  \time 3/4
ees2 g4      | % 1
    ees2 bes4      | % 2
    ees g bes      | % 3
    ees,2 d4      | % 4
    cis2.
}
>>
Fourth Movement

\new PianoStaff <<
    \set PianoStaff.instrumentName = #""
    \new Staff = "upper" \relative c'' {
  \clef treble
  \key ees \major
  \time 2/4

  \partial 8 ees8(^\markup {Allegro molto} g4. ees8) d4.( f8) aes4.( f8) ees4.( g8) bes4-.( bes-.) bes4. g8
 bes16( aes) f8 aes16( g) ees8 g4( f8)
}
    \new Staff = "lower" \relative c {
  \clef bass
  \key ees \major
  \time 2/4
r8 ees4 r bes' r bes, r ees r ees d ees r8 e f d ees! a, bes4 r8
}
  >>

Quotes about Symphony No. 3[edit]

  • In writing this symphony, Beethoven had been thinking of Buonaparte, but Buonaparte while he was First Consul. At that time Beethoven had the highest esteem for him, and compared him to the greatest consuls of Ancient Rome. Not only I, but many of Beethoven's closer friends, saw this symphony on his table, beautifully copied in manuscript, with the word "Buonaparte" inscribed at the very top of the title-page and "Ludwig van Beethoven" at the very bottom ...
    I was the first to tell him the news that Buonaparte had declared himself Emperor, whereupon he broke into a rage and exclaimed, "So he is no more than a common mortal! Now, too, he will tread under foot all the rights of Man, indulge only his ambition; now he will think himself superior to all men, become a tyrant!" Beethoven went to the table, seized the top of the title-page, tore it in half and threw it on the floor. The page had to be recopied, and it was only now that the symphony received the title Sinfonia eroica.
    • Ferdinand Ries, quoted in Michael Hamburger, ed., Beethoven: Letters, Journals and Conversations (New York: Anchor Books, 1960), 29-30.
  • The first rehearsal of the symphony was terrible, but the hornist did, in fact, come in on cue. I was standing next to Beethoven and, believing that he had made a wrong entrance, I said, "That damned hornist! Can't he count? It sounds frightfully wrong." I believe I was in danger of getting my ears boxed. Beethoven did not forgive me for a long time.
    • Ries, Ferdinand; Franz Wegeler; Frederick Noonan, translator (1987). Beethoven Remembered: The Biographical Notes of Franz Wegeler and Ferdinand Ries. Arlington, Virginia: Great Ocean Publishers. p. 69. ISBN 0-915556-15-4. 

External links[edit]

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