Talk:Curiosity

From Wikiquote
Jump to navigation Jump to search

First page I've really worked on. I added around a half dozen quotes hope this conforms to wikiquote standards.

DFA 23:10, 17 January 2006 (UTC)

Unsourced[edit]

  • "Blessed are the curious for they shall have adventures." ~ Lovelle Drachman
  • "To be curious about that which is not one's concern while still in ignorance of oneself is ridiculous." ~ Plato
  • "Curiosity killed the cat, but for a while I was a suspect." ~ Steven Wright
  • "I have no special talents. I am only passionately curious." ~ Albert Einstein
  • "It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education." ~ Albert Einstein
  • "Only barbarians are not curious about where they come from, how they came to be where they are, where they appear to be going, whether they wish to go there, and if so, why, and if not, why not." ~ Isaiah Berlin
  • "When you're curious, you find lots of interesting things to do." ~ Walt Disney
  • "Curiousity is one of Satan's favorite paths, to lead man to sin." ~ Anonymous
  • "Curiousity killed the cat, yet the cat had nine lives.. thus.. curiousity killed it eight times more." ~ John Albert Halili
  • "Curiosity killed the cat, but satisfaction brought it back." ~ Eugene O'Neill
  • "Curiosity killed the cat, but I'm much bigger than a cat." ~ Kedd Burmeister
  • "The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity."
    • Widely attributed to Dorothy Parker and to Ellen Parr, but the origin is unknown.

Quotes requiring editorial work[edit]

Most of these are probably non notable, many require verification and correct formatting
  • Four central issues of curiosity are: definition and dimensionally, cause, voluntary exposure to curiosity, and situational determinants. A fifth issue is of superficiality and intensity. Curiosity can arise, change focus or end abruptly and despite its transience, curiosity can be a powerful motivational force. Curiosity often produces impulse behavior and attempts at self control.
    • G. Loewenstein (1994), in "The Psychology of curiosity: A review and reinterpretation". Psychological Bulletin, 116(1):75-98.
  • Classified measures of curiosity into two categories. First, curiosity is viewed as a motivational state and measured with behavioral indices. Second, he conceptualizes curiosity as a personality trait that is assessed by personality measures.
    • R. Langevin (1971), in "Is curiosity a unitary construct?" Canadian Journal of Psychology.
  • At the conceptual level there are numerous definitions of curiosity which tend to encompass a broad range of characteristics. Boredom is one prerequisite or motivation for curiosity (exploration).
    • H. Fowler (1965), in "Curiosity and Exploratory Behavior". New York: Macmillan.
  • The biological function of curiosity as a mechanism of instinct driven behavior that serves in approaching new objects. Approach and exploration are described as being characteristic forms of behavior. The second kind of curiosity pointed is "scientific curiosity" and "metaphysical wonder" with which "the practical instinctive root has probably nothing to do" rather "the philosophical brain responds to an inconsistency or a gap in its knowledge.
    • W. James (1950), in "Principles of Psychology". New York: Holt.(original work published 1890).
  • Sensation seeking is defined as the seeking of varied, novel, complex and intense sensations and experiences, and the willingness to take physical, social, legal, and financial risks for the sake of such experiences.
    • M. Zuckerman (1994), in "Behavioral Expressions and Biosocial Bases of Sensation Seeking". New York: Cambridge University Press.
Petroglyphs, dating back to 10 000 BCE and indicating a thriving culture - Cultures generally vary both in attitudes towards exploration and information seeking as well as in the range of situations allowing the expression of the various manifestations of exploration and curiosity, this is especially true for the sensation-seeking motive...- D. O. Hebb.
  • Cultures generally vary both in attitudes towards exploration and information seeking as well as in the range of situations allowing the expression of the various manifestations of exploration and curiosity, this is especially true for the sensation-seeking motive. Curiosity seeking behavior poses a paradox for drive based accounts of curiosity. Drive is not simply a state the decrease of which is rewarding. At high levels the reduction of drive is rewarding, but at low levels, an increase may be rewarding. stations]] of exploration and curiosity, this is especially true for the sensation-seeking motive. Curiosity seeking behavior poses a paradox for drive based accounts of curiosity. Drive is not simply a state the decrease of which is rewarding. At high levels the reduction of drive is rewarding, but at low levels, an increase may be rewarding.
    • D. O. Hebb (1955), in "Drives and the C.N.S. (Conceptual Nervous System)". Psychological Review, 62:243-245.
  • Curiosity refers to a motivation inherent in information processing. This means that curiosity is a mixture of cognition and motivation. The main principle, which is equally as important as the drive reduction hypothesis is the establishment and maintenance of an optimal amount of incongruence. Incongruence determines the strength, direction and affective qualities of behavior.
    • J. McV. Hunt (1963), in "Motivation Inherent in Information Processing and Action". In: Motivation and Social Interaction: Cognitive Determinants. New York: Ronal.
  • Sensation is the seeking of varied, novel, complex and intense sensations and experiences, and the willingness to take physical, social, legal, and financial risks for the sake of such experiences.
    • M. Zuckerman (1994), in "Behavioral Expressions and Biosocial Bases of Sensation Seeking". New York: Cambridge University Press.