Talk:Edward Everett Hale

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  • "Do you pray for the Senators, Dr. Hale?" someone asked the chaplain. "No, I look at the Senators and pray for the country."
  • Even with all my wrinkles! I am beautiful!
  • In the name of Hypocrites, doctors have invented the most exquisite form of torture ever known to man: survival.
  • Never bear more than one kind of trouble at a time. Some people bear three — all they have had, all they have now, and all they expect to have.
  • Sometimes your medicine bottle has on it, "Shake well before using." That is what God has to do with some of His people. He has to shake them well before they are ever usable.
  • Wise anger is like fire from a flint: there is great ado to get it out; and when it does come, it is out again immediately.
  • Tell the truth.
    Do not talk about your own affairs.
    Confess Ignorance.
    Talk to the person who talks to you.
    Do not under-rate her.
    At dinner talk to the person on each side of you.
    Be short.

Inaccurate citations[edit]

I read this passage and thereafter looked up the two books cited. NO WHERE in those books is this quote found. "Variant:
I am only one,
But still I am one.
I cannot do everything,
But still I can do something;
And because I cannot do everything,
I will not refuse to do the something that I can do.
The Book of Good Cheer : A Little Bundle of Cheery Thoughts‎ (1909) by Edwin Osgood Grover, p. 28; also in Masterpieces of Religious Verse (1948) by James Dalton Morrison, p. 416, where it is titled 'Lend a Hand'" —This unsigned comment is by 2001:468:c80:a103:417:7fb9:aa0a:67cd (talkcontribs) .

  • I looked up the referenced books—for both variants—in the Internet Archive. As for the first (non-variant Greenough) quote:
"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. The something I ought to do, I can do. And by the grace of God, I will"
I found something different, the same wording as the variant quote:
"I am only one; but still I am one. I cannot do everything; but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do the something that I can do."
As for the variant quote, in Grover I could not find the cited lines, only an entirely different quote from Hale, on p. 55: "Never attempt to bear more than one kind of trouble at once. Some people bear three kinds—all they have had, all they have now, and all they expect to have." I did find the variant quote as cited in Morrison. --Hughh (talk) 18:48, 2 March 2017 (UTC)