Talk:Evelyn Waugh

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I'm sure most of the "attributed" quotes have an easily identifiable source if only the diaries and letters were checked.

Unsourced[edit]

Wikiquote no longer allows unsourced quotations, and they are in process of being removed from our pages (see Wikiquote:Limits on quotations); but if you can provide a reliable, precise and verifiable source for any quote on this list please move it to Evelyn Waugh. --Antiquary 18:54, 4 May 2009 (UTC)

  • I put the words down and push them around bit.
  • I think to be oversensitive about cliches is like being oversensitive about table manners.
  • If politicians and scientists were lazier, how much happier we should all be.
  • In the dying world I come from quotation is a national vice. It used to be the classics, now it's lyric verse.
  • Manners are especially the need of the plain. The pretty can get away with anything.
  • Money is only useful when you get rid of it. It is like the odd card in "Old Maid"; the player who is finally left with it has lost.
  • My unhealthy affection for my second daughter has waned. Now I despise all my seven children equally.
  • Not everyone grows to be old, but everyone has been younger than he is now.
  • One forgets words as one forgets names. One's vocabulary needs constant fertilizing or it will die.
  • Perhaps host and guest is really the happiest relation for father and son.
  • Pray always for all the learned, the oblique, the delicate. Let them not be quite forgotten at the throne of God when the simple come into their kingdom.
  • Professional reviewers read so many bad books in the course of duty that they get an unhealthy craving for arresting phrases.
  • Saints are simply men and women who have fulfilled their natural obligation which is to approach God.
  • The human mind likes a strange idea as little as the body likes a strange protein and resists it with a similar energy. Is falsely attributed to Waugh. Actually from Wilfred Trotter, 1941 and is quoted by Beveridge, W. I. B, The Art of Scientific Investigation, London:Heinemann 1950 p. 108 - according to Koestler, The Art of Creation p.217
  • The truth is that Oxford is simply a very beautiful city in which it is convenient to segregate a certain number of the young of the nation while they are growing up.
  • There are no poetic ideas; only poetic utterances.
  • What a man enjoys about a woman's clothes are his fantasies of how she would look without them.
  • What is youth except a man or a woman before it is ready or fit to be seen?
  • When we argue for our limitations, we get to keep them.
  • Words should be an intense pleasure just as leather should be to a shoemaker.