The Flintstones

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The Flintstones, a Hanna-Barbera animated series, is one of the most successful animated television series of all time, originally running in American prime time for six seasons, from 1960 to 1966, on the ABC network.

Original Series[edit]

Wilma and Betty: Melville J. Muchrocks is a crook.
Fred: Muchrocks a crook? Are you sure?
Wilma: Absolutely, he's wanted by the police.
Betty: We heard him described to a T.
Fred: Wilma, do you know where they went?
Wilma: They said they were going to the amusement park and then to dinner. Oh my poor mother.
Fred: Don't you worry sweetheart, you leave it to me. Barney.
Barney: Yeah Fred?
Fred: C'mon, let's go.
Barney: Right Fred.
Fred: You ever play football, Barney?
Barney: Yeah Fred, why?
Fred: Because you're going to run interference while I intercept a proposal.

Barney: Frederick! Frederick! I HATE FREDERICK!!!!

Wilma: I work hard all day, too, and what do I get? A lot of yak from you. You at least get out everyday, see things, talk to people. I never get out of this cave.

Fred: Where's your get up and go?
Barney: It just got up and went.

Fred: I love my dear sweet mother in-law. My mother in-law is a doll.
Attendant: Are you feeling alright, mister?
Fred: Huh? Yeah. Yeah, I'm okay.
Attendant: Good. Good. You just stay in here and rest. That hot sun out there is a killer.
Fred: Poor guy, he must have been standing in it for hours.

Fred: Yeah, you laugh. You'll see, Barn, they know me in this bank, they'll help me right a way.
Bank Clerk: Look, pals, it's Fred Flintstone.
Fred: Yeah, hi. I'd like to lent some money here.
Bank Clerk: Ha ha ha ha! See that, pals? Fred Flintstone wants money. Ha ha ha ha ha!

Betty: Sometimes I just don't know what's the matter with men.
Barney: That's easy - you women!

Fred: How can you be so stupid?
Barney: Hey, that's not very nice. Say you're sorry.
Fred: I'm sorry you're stupid.

About The Flintstones[edit]

  • Here we were with a brand new thing that had never been done before, an animated prime-time television show. So we developed two storyboards; one was they had a helicopter of some kind and they went to the opera or whatever, and the other was Fred and Barney fighting over a swimming pool. So I go back to New York with a portfolio and two half-hour boards. And no-one would even believe that you'd dare to suggest a thing like that, I mean they looked at you and they'd think you're crazy. But slowly the word got out, and I used the presentation which took almost an hour and a half. I would go to the other two boards and tell them what they did, and do all the voices and the sounds and so-on, and I'd stagger back to the hotel and I'd collapse. The phone would ring like crazy, like one time I did Bristol-Myers, the whole company was there. When I got through I'd go back to the hotel the phone would ring and say "the president wasn't at that meeting, could you come back and do it for him." So I had many of those, one time I had two agencies, they'd fill the room I mean God about 40 people, and I did this whole show. I got to know where the laughs were, and where to hit it, nothing; dead, dead, dead. So one of the people at Screen Gems said "This is the worst, those guys...." he was so angry at them. What it was, was that there were two agencies there, and neither one was going to let the other one know they were enjoying it. But I pitched it for eight straight weeks and nobody bought it. So after sitting in New York just wearing out, you know really wearing out. Pitch, pitch, pitch, sometimes five a day. So finally on the very last day I pitched it to ABC, which was a young daring network willing to try new things, and bought the show in 15 minutes. Thank goodness, because this was the very last day and if they hadn't bought it I would have taken everything down, put it in the archives and never pitched it again. Sometimes I wake up in a cold-sweat thinking this is how close you get to disaster.
    • Joseph Barbera Leonard Moltan interviews Joseph Barbera, 1997
  • A pen and ink disaster.
    • Variety, after the pilot; Leonard Maltin interviews Joseph Barbera-1997

External links[edit]

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