Toilet

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If you must know, it’s my thunderbox. —Evelyn Waugh

A toilet, also known as a latrine, lavatory, loo, john, or commode, among other names, is a piece of sanitary hardware that collects human urine and feces, and sometimes toilet paper, usually for disposal.

Quotes[edit]

Flying latrines they are called, because when you have filled them, you throw them as far away as you can. —Mark Whitaker
  • ’If you must know, it's my thunderbox.’.. He..dragged out the treasure, a brass-bound, oak cube... On the inside of the lid was a plaque bearing the embossed title Connolly's Chemical Closet.
  • With no mains water and no sewerage system, the bags are used as toilets. Flying latrines they are called, because when you have filled them, you throw them as far away as you can. And when the rains come and wash them out there is a good chance that some little boy or girl sent on an errand will see a bag in the street and use it again, to carry firewood or maybe food.
  • Pecunia non olet (Money doesn’t stink)
    • Vespasian, Chmaber’s Dictionary of Quotations, p. 879-880, attributed "His son Titus had objected to a tax on the contents of the city's urinals (used by fullers). Quoted in Suetonius Vespasian, chapter 23.
  • Well, I took the crayfish home, and I thought he'd like a swim,
    So I filled up the chamber pot, and I threw the bugger in.
    By the way side high diddly aye do.
    In the middle of the night, I thought I'd have a fit,
    When my old lady got up to a-have a shit.
    By the way side high diddly aye do.
    Husband, husband, she cried out to me,
    The devil's in the chamber pot, and he's got hold of me.
    By the way side high diddly aye do.
    Children, children, bring the looking glass,
    Come and see the crayfish that bit your mother's arse.
    By the way side high diddly aye do
    Children, children, did you hear the grunt,
    Come and see the crayfish that bit your mother's cunt.
    By the way side high diddly aye do.
    • ”The Crayfish”, traditional English folk song
  • Do ye not perceive, that whatsoever thing from without entereth into the man, it cannot defile him; Because it entereth not into his heart, but into the belly, and goeth out into the draught, purging all meats?

External links[edit]

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