United States Marine Corps

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United States Marine Corps is the branch of the United States Armed Forces established to conduct amphibious (ship to shore) combat and protect diplomatic missions of the United States government.

Semper Fidelis ~ Motto of the United States Marine Corps
I have just returned from visiting the Marines at the front, and there is not a finer fighting organization in the world. ~ Douglas MacArthur
For some people, being a Marine would be a kind of living Hell; for others it is a reason to live. ~ Jonah Goldberg
You can’t choose to be a Marine if you do not meet the requirements, but you are free to try. ~ Jonah Goldberg
THIS DEVICE ON HEADGEAR OR UNIFORM MEANS U.S. MARINES - NARA - 515720
U.S. MARINES. ON LAND AT SEA IN THE AIR - NARA - 515111


ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZSee alsoExternal links

Quotes[edit]

A[edit]

  • Semper Fidelis
    • Anonymous, official motto of the USMC
    • Always Faithful ~ English translation of Latin motto
    • Semper Fi! ~ Abbreviated version
  • From the halls of Montezuma
    To the shores of Tripoli
    We fight our country's battles,
    in the air, on land, and sea.

B[edit]

  • I am sure a vast number of Americans were revulsed when they heard news reports and read about the marine male-prostitute ring uncovered at Camp Pendleton, California, in July 1978. It had been operating for three years with its roots spreading into the Hollywood "gay" community some one hundred miles away. It was reported by an unnamed officer, "The recruiters looked for fair-skinned, young-looking kids and usually approached them on a one-to-one basis. They would strike up a conversation, eventually suggesting that good money could be made on weekends working for the ring." All twelve of the participating marines were discharged.
    • Anita Bryant, At Any Cost (1978) by Anita Bryant and Bob Green. Old Tappan: Fleming H. Revell Company, p. 148

D[edit]

  • Come on, you sons-o'-bitches! Do you want to live forever?
    • First Sergeant Daniel Daly, 73rd Machine Gun Company, to the men in his company prior to charging the Germans during the Battle of Belleau Wood in World War I. This is the version popularly attributed to Daly and recorded by Floyd Gibbons in And They Thought We Wouldn't Fight (1918), p. 304, ISBN 9781417903719
    • Variant: For Christ's sake men—come on! Do you want to live forever?
      • First Sergeant Daniel Daly, 73rd Machine Gun Company. Alternative version claimed by Daly himself.

F[edit]

G[edit]

  • Otherwise the epitome of male liberation is Marine Corps boot camp, twelve weeks without a moment of liberty, all devoted chiefly to the extirpation of feminine ties and sentiments in the assembled young men. From the moment one arrives, the drill instructors begin a torrent of misogynistic and anti-individualist abuse. The good things are manly and collective; the despicable are feminine and individual. Virtually every sentence, every description, every lesson embodies this sexual duality, and the female anatomy provides a rich field of metaphor for every degradation.
    • George Gilder, Sexual Suicide (New York: Quadrangle Books, 1973), p. 258-259
  • When you want to create a solitary group of male killers, that is what you do, you kill the women in them. That is the lesson of the Marines. And it works. Artfully exploiting the internal pressures of the group, the instructors manage to evoke a fanatical commitment from almost every recruit. They arrive as various and rebellious boys, swearing under their breath what they will do to any drill instructor who lays a hand on them. They end up, after twelve weeks of manhandling, often including violent physical abuse, gladly and voluntarily making large financial gifts to the instructors. It is the closest thing to an act of love that happens at Parris Island.
    • George Gilder, Sexual Suicide (New York: Quadrangle Books, 1973), p. 259
  • Most of those who have experienced these sentiments would testify that they are not exactly homosexual. They do not represent a shift to males of sentiments conventionally directed toward females. They represent rather a distinctive bonding process that corresponds very closely to the kind of male tie that Lionel Tiger has controversially envisaged. It has its uses in protecting a society from its enemies or in abetting the performance of crucial group activities. But it is deadly to individuality and civilization. It is deadly to the setiments that women evoke from men: love, creativity, nurturance, commitment to the future. Above all, it is perfectly barren (in the etymolohical sense, from the old French word bar, meaning man). The male group, separated from women, is the sterile solidarity. There is no real love, no individuality, and no procreative instinct.
    • George Gilder, Sexual Suicide (New York: Quadrangle Books, 1973), p. 259
  • [I]nstitutions and communities need to be able to exploit their comparative advantages. It’s not just that the Marine Corps demands more from its members than the Peace Corps; it’s that the Marines demand different things. For some people, being a Marine would be a kind of living Hell; for others it is a reason to live. That’s what the individual pursuit of happiness means... You can’t choose to be a Marine if you do not meet the requirements, but you are free to try.

K[edit]

  • When our Marines, sent to Lebanon on a multinational peacekeeping mission with the consent of the United States Congress, were murdered in their sleep, the "blame America first crowd" didn't blame the terrorists who murdered the Marines, they blamed the United States. But then, they always blame America first. ... The American people know better.
  • Gunnery Sergeant Hartman: Today, you people are no longer pukes. Today, you are Marines. You're part of a brotherhood. From now, until the day you die, wherever you go, every Marine is your brother. And always remember this: Marines die, that's what we're here for. But the Marine Corps lives forever, and that means you live forever.
    • Full Metal Jacket (1987), by Stanley Kubrick, Michael Herr, and Gustav Hasford, Warner Bros

M[edit]

  • Marines are the best because the Marines is a service that focuses on values. If you look at Marine Corps commercials and compare them to every other service, you know, the Army talks about all the different jobs you can do and what it will help set you up afterwards. You know, you can be an Army of one with all the different skills you learn. The Navy talks about all the cool technology that you get to use. And they always have pictures of people with big, big computer screens, things like this, right? The Navy ships, you can picture in your head, right? And the Air Force always has guys, like, working on aircraft. And it's like: "You can get a great job working in the civilian sector when you're done." The Marine Corps never does that. The Marine Corps says: "honor, courage and commitment. If you believe in leadership, if you believe in — if you want a really tough time, then come and serve with us."

P[edit]

R[edit]

S[edit]

  • I walked into this recruiting office, and the Navy had these bell-bottoms on, and the Army had these shitty-looking blouses, like a little girl’s blouse, and the Marines had this real mean-looking, hot uniform, and I'm like, "Yo, if I can't get chicks in this uniform, forget it, dude." Little did I know it was the smallest branch out of all of them, and it was the elite branch, and it was the hardest. But I was never a model Marine, you know? I used to drive from New York to North Carolina every weekend, just to do records – eighteen hours’ drive all around. They took my stripe away because I was late.
  • It was the fate of our Marines to be at the front at a moment when the destiny of the modern world hung in the balance, and to have played a part that will be gratefully remembered here in America, as well as in western Europe, through generations to come.
  • Lady, there was a killing war. The Marine Corps taught me how to kill Japs and try to survive. Now, if that don't fit into any academic course, I'm sorry. But some of us had to do the killing — and most of my buddies got killed or wounded.
    • Eugene Sledge, China Marine: An Infantryman's Life after World War II, p. 135

T[edit]

  • They have a propaganda machine that is almost equal to Stalin's.


Disputed[edit]

  • Come on, you sons-o'-bitches! Do you want to live forever?
    • First Sergeant Daniel Daly, 73rd Machine Gun Company, to the men in his company prior to charging the Germans during the Battle of Belleau Wood in World War I. This is the version popularly attributed to Daly and recorded by Floyd Gibbons in And They Thought We Wouldn't Fight (1918), p. 304, ISBN 9781417903719
    • Variant: For Christ's sake men—come on! Do you want to live forever?
    • Also attributed to Frederick the Great, addressing his men at the 1757 w:Battle of Kolín: Dogs, would you live forever? (Kerls, wollt ihr ewig leben?) Duffy, Christopher: Frederick the Great: A Military Life. 1985: Law Book Co of Australasia. ISBN 978-0710096494.

External links[edit]