User:BD2412/RQ

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Topics[edit]

Other red[edit]

  1. Doing good (450 to 453) - User:BD2412/Doing good (450 to 453)
  2. Government—citizen participation (766 to 772) - User:BD2412/Government—citizen participation (766 to 772)
  3. Government—definition of (773 to 775) - User:BD2412/Government—definition of (773 to 775)
  4. Government—purpose of (776 to 787) - User:BD2412/Government—purpose of (776 to 787)
  5. Government officials (793 to 794) - User:BD2412/Government officials (793 to 794)
  6. Impropriety (895) - User:BD2412/Impropriety (895)
  7. McCarthyism (1170 to 1171) - User:BD2412/McCarthyism (1170 to 1171)
  8. Mediocrity (1172) - User:BD2412/Mediocrity (1172)
  9. Military affairs (1176 to 1185) - User:BD2412/Military affairs (1176 to 1185)
  10. New England (1241) - User:BD2412/New England (1241)
  11. North Carolina (1253) - User:BD2412/North Carolina (1253)
  12. Patronage (1313 to 1314) - User:BD2412/Patronage (1313 to 1314)
  13. Perverseness (1359) - User:BD2412/Perverseness (1359)
  14. Point of view (1365 to 1366) - User:BD2412/Point of view (1365 to 1366)
  15. Public affairs (1551 to 1552) - User:BD2412/Public affairs (1551 to 1552)
  16. Relevance (1589) - User:BD2412/Relevance (1589)
  17. Speaking out (1745 to 1749) - User:BD2412/Speaking out (1745 to 1749)
  18. State (1755 to 1760) - User:BD2412/State (1755 to 1760)
  19. States rights (1761 to 1763) - User:BD2412/States rights (1761 to 1763)
  20. Three-mile limit (1809) - User:BD2412/Three-mile limit (1809)
  21. War in Asia (1967 to 1968) - User:BD2412/War in Asia (1967 to 1968)
  22. Weather (1982) - User:BD2412/Weather (1982)
  23. Westward movement (1985 to 1986) - User:BD2412/Westward movement (1985 to 1986)
  24. World domination (2039 to 2045) - User:BD2412/World domination (2039 to 2045)

Other blue[edit]

  1. Duty (467 to 474) - User:BD2412/Duty
  2. Economy (479 to 480)
  3. Education (481 to 505) - User:BD2412/Education
  4. Energy (526 to 527)
  5. England (528 to 536)
  6. Environment (541 to 545) - User:BD2412/Environment
  7. Epitaphs (546 to 549)
  8. Equality (550 to 554)
  9. Europe (556 to 559) - User:BD2412/Europe
  10. Experience (570 to 577) - User:BD2412/Experience
  11. Facts (582 to 585)
  12. Failure (586 to 590) - User:BD2412/Failure
  13. Faith (591 to 592)
  14. Flying (603 to 604)
  15. Fools (605 to 610)
  16. Forgiveness (635)
  17. Fortune (636 to 638)
  18. Freedom (639 to 659) - User:BD2412/Freedom
  19. Freedom of religion (667 to 670)
  20. Friendship (682 to 690) - User:BD2412/Friendship
  21. Future (691 to 698)
  22. God (699 to 705)
  23. Government (706 to 759) - User:BD2412/Government
  24. Greatness (814 to 831)
  25. Greed (832 to 833)
  26. Guilt (834 to 837)
  27. Happiness (839 to 846)
  28. Hate (849 to 850)
  29. Health (851)
  30. History (853 to 858)
  31. Home (859 to 861)
  32. Honesty (862)
  33. Hope (863)
  34. Human rights (864 to 867)
  35. Ideas (872 to 875)
  36. Idleness (876)
  37. Ignorance (877 to 880)
  38. Immortality (885 to 887)
  39. Independence Day (896 to 897)
  40. Ingratitude (906)
  41. Injustice (907 to 909)
  42. Israel (912 to 914)
  43. Italy (915)
  44. Jesus Christ (916 to 921)
  45. Joy (922 to 923)
  46. Judges (924 to 930)
  47. Judgment (931 to 937)
  48. Justice (945 to 963)
  49. Knowledge (966 to 974)
  50. Labor (975 to 981)
  51. Last words (988 to 990)
  52. Law (991 to 1013)
  53. Lawyers (1014 to 1017)
  54. Leadership (1018 to 1025)
  55. Liberty (1045 to 1081) User:BD2412/Liberty
  56. Lies (1082 to 1083)
  57. Life (1084 to 1106)
  58. Abraham Lincoln (1107 to 1110)
  59. Lobbyists (1128)
  60. Loneliness (1129)
  61. Love (1130 to 1136)
  62. Majority (1137 to 1141)
  63. Man (1142 to 1162)
  64. Marriage (1163 to 1169)
  65. Memory (1173 to 1175)
  66. Mind (1194 to 1198)
  67. Moderation (1199)
  68. Money (1200 to 1209)
  69. Morality (1210 to 1214)
  70. Mortality (1215 to 1224)
  71. Mothers (1225 to 1226)
  72. Motives (1227 to 1231)
  73. Nation (1233 to 1239)
  74. News (1242 to 1243)
  75. Nobility (1251 to 1252)
  76. Nuclear war (1257 to 1259)
  77. Opinions (1262 to 1275)
  78. Oratory (1276 to 1288)
  79. Order (1289 to 1290)
  80. Past (1291 to 1293)
  81. Past and future (1294 to 1297)
  82. Past and present (1298 to 1301)
  83. Patriotism (1302 to 1312)
  84. Peace (1315 to 1329)
  85. People (1330 to 1347)
  86. Perfection (1348 to 1352)
  87. Perseverance (1353 to 1358)
  88. Plans (1360 to 1362)
  89. Policy (1367 to 1372)
  90. Politicians (1389 to 1408)
  91. Politics (1409 to 1432)
  92. Poverty (1440 to 1442)
  93. Power (1443 to 1458)
  94. Praise (1459 to 1461)
  95. Prayers (1462 to 1480)
  96. Prejudice (1481 to 1484)
  97. Press (1520 to 1524)
  98. Prisons (1525 to 1528)
  99. Privacy (1529 to 1531)
  100. Progress (1532 to 1541)
  101. Promise (1542)
  102. Promises (1543 to 1546)
  103. Property (1547 to 1550)
  104. Publicity (1572 to 1573)
  105. Race (1575 to 1580)
  106. Reading (1581)
  107. Reasons (1582)
  108. Reform (1583 to 1585)
  109. Responsibility (1603 to 1611)
  110. Retribution (1612)
  111. Revolution (1613 to 1618)
  112. Revolutionary War (1775–1783) (1619 to 1630)
  113. Rich (1631 to 1633)
  114. Right (1634 to 1637)
  115. Right and wrong (1638 to 1642)
  116. Rights (1643 to 1644)
  117. Rome (1646 to 1648)
  118. Russia (1652 to 1658)
  119. Santa Claus (1660)
  120. Science (1661 to 1665)
  121. Sea (1666 to 1667)
  122. Secrecy (1668 to 1670)
  123. Self (1673 to 1676)
  124. Self-examination (1678 to 1679)
  125. Sex (1684 to 1685)
  126. Shakespeare, William (1564–1616) (1686)
  127. Ships and shipping (1687 to 1689)
  128. Silence (1690 to 1695)
  129. Sincerity (1696)
  130. Sins (1697)
  131. Slavery (1698 to 1706)
  132. Sleep (1707)
  133. Smile (1708 to 1709)
  134. Socialism (1711 to 1713)
  135. Society (1714 to 1719)
  136. Soldiers (1720 to 1734)
  137. Spirit (1750 to 1754)
  138. Statistics (1768 to 1769)
  139. Strength (1772 to 1774)
  140. Success (1777 to 1786)
  141. Taxation (1787 to 1798)
  142. Time (1810 to 1817)
  143. Trust (1827 to 1828)
  144. Truth (1829 to 1839)
  145. Tyranny (1844 to 1845)
  146. Union (1848 to 1855)
  147. United Nations (1856 to 1858)
  148. Unity (1859 to 1867)
  149. Values (1868)
  150. Victory (1869 to 1875)
  151. Violence (1889 to 1896)
  152. Voters and voting (1897 to 1908)
  153. War (1909 to 1954)
  154. War and peace (1955 to 1966)
  155. Washington, D.C. (1969 to 1975)
  156. George Washington (1976 to 1977)
  157. Water (1978)
  158. Wisdom (1995 to 2003)
  159. Wives (2004 to 2009)
  160. Women (2010 to 2018)
  161. Words (2019 to 2021)
  162. Work (2022 to 2032)
  163. World (2033 to 2038)
  164. World War I (2046 to 2049)
  165. World War II (2050 to 2070)
  166. Worth (2071 to 2073)
  167. Writers and writing (2074 to 2082)

Blue questions[edit]

  1. Individual (868 to 871) - User:BD2412/Individual ?
  2. Needs (1240) - User:BD2412/Needs (1240)
  3. Obscenity (1261) - User:BD2412/Obscenity (1261)

RQ missing[edit]

  • Nothing that we could say could add to the impressiveness of the lesson furnished by the events of the past year, as to the needs and the dangerous condition of the neglected classes in our city. Those terrible days in July—the sudden appearance, as if from the bosom of the earth, of a most infuriated and degraded mob; the helplessness of property holders and the better classes;… immense destruction of property—were the first dreadful revelations to many of our people of the existence among us of a great, ignorant, irresponsible class who were growing up here without any permanent interest in the welfare of the community or the success of the government…. It should be remembered that there are no dangers to the value of property, or to the permanency of our institutions, so great as those from the existence of such a class of vagabond, ignorant, and ungoverned children. This "dangerous class" has not begun to show itself as it will in eight or ten years when these boys and girls are matured. Those who were too negligent or too selfish to notice them as children, will be fully aware of them as men. They will vote. They will have the same rights as we ourselves, though they have grown up ignorant of moral principle…. They will poison society. They will perhaps be embittered at the wealth and the luxuries they never share. Then let society beware, when the outcasts, vicious, reckless multitude … swarming now in every foul alley and low street, come to know their power and use it.
    • Children's Aid Society 11th Annual Report, "written in the aftermath of the draft riots of 1864", according to Senator Robert F. Kennedy, who quoted from it August 25, 1966. Federal Role in Urban Affairs, hearings before the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization of the Committee on Government Operations, United States Senate, 89th Congress, 2d session (1966), part 4, p. 919.
  • Sir, since the debate opened months ago those of us who have stood against this proposition have been taunted many times with being little Americans. Leave us the word American, keep that in your presumptuous impeachment, and no taunt can disturb us, no gibe discompose our purposes. Call us little Americans if you will, but leave us the consolation and the pride which the term American, however modified, still imparts.
    • William Edgar Borah, remarks in the Senate, November 19, 1919, Congressional Record, vol. 58, p. 8783. This speech, known as the "Little American" speech, referred to the treaty to ratify the League of Nations proposed after World War I.
  • That what is true of business and politics is gloriously true of the professions, the arts and crafts, the sciences, the sports. That the best picture has not yet been painted; the greatest poem is still unsung; the mightiest novel remains to be written; the divinest music has not been conceived even by Bach. In science, probably ninety-nine percent of the knowable has to be discovered. We know only a few streaks about astronomy. We are only beginning to imagine the force and composition of the atom. Physics has not yet found any indivisible matter, or psychology a sensible soul.
    • Lincoln Steffens, "This World Depression of Ours is Chock-full of Good News", Hearst's International Combined with Cosmopolitan (October 1932), p. 26; reprinted in The World of Lincoln Steffens, ed. Ella Winter and Herbert Shapiro (1962), p. 216.
  • Catholic-baiting is the anti-Semitism of the liberals.
    • Peter Viereck, Shame and Glory of the Intellectuals (1953), chapter 3, p. 45.
  • Where they [] resemble each other, however, is that in all cases, it is the Western impact which has stirred up the winds of change and set the processes of modernization in motion. Education brought not only the idea of equality but also another belief which we used to take for granted in the West—the idea of progress, the idea that science and technology can be used to better human conditions. In ancient society, men tended to believe themselves fortunate if tomorrow was not worse than today and anyway, there was little they could do about it. The idea, the revolutionary idea, that tomorrow might be better and that man can do something about it is entirely Western—and all around the world it inspires what Mr. Adlai Stevenson has called "the revolution of rising expectations." If a man has lived in a tradition which tells him that nothing can be done about his human condition, to believe that progress is possible may well be the greatest revolution of all.
    • Barbara Ward, The Unity of the Free World (1961), p. 12; from her lecture on the cultures of Asia and the continent of Africa, State University of Iowa, Iowa City (April 6, 1961).
  • I didn't say that I didn't say it. I said that I didn't say that I said it. I want to make that very clear.
    • Attributed to George Romney, National Review (December 12, 1967), cover. Reported as unverified in Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations (1989).
  • A committee is a group of the unwilling, chosen from the unfit, to do the unnecessary.
    • Author unknown. Reported Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations (1989).

Hold off[edit]

  1. Living (1111 to 1127) - User:BD2412/Living (1111 to 1127)
  2. Times (1818 to 1822) - User:BD2412/Times (1818 to 1822)