Victor Rothschild, 3rd Baron Rothschild

From Wikiquote
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Nathaniel Mayer Victor Rothschild, 3rd Baron Rothschild (31 October 191020 March 1990) was a British biologist.

Quotes[edit]

  • "… I am not, and never have been, a Soviet agent."
    • Letter to newspapers (1986)
  • "Sacrifice money, not principles."
    • Seen attributed to Lord Victor on a meme on Facebook

Needs verification, however, so far, it's the only other quote found so far, besides his refutation of allegations as shown above this.


Disputed[edit]

  • The time to buy is when there's blood in the streets, even if the blood is your own.
    • A statement sometimes attributed to him, and also, more plausibly, to the first Baron Rothschild (as one of 1871); as quoted in Heads I Win, Tails I Win: Why Smart Investors Fail and How to Tilt the Odds in Your Favour (2016) by Spencer Jakab, p. 221
    • Variants:
    • When there's blood in the streets it's time to buy.

Quotes about Rothschild[edit]

  • For Rothschild... the Avenue Marigny house was a home from home, but... I felt, a prison. Installed there, he was the the de facto if not the de jure head of the family. ...[H]is disposition was a curious, uneasy mixture of arrogance and diffidence. Somewhere between White's Club and the Ark of the Covenant, between the Old and the New Testament, between the Kremlin and the House of Lords, he had lost his way, and been floundering about ever since. Embedded deep down in him there was something touching and vulnerable and perceptive; at times lovable even. But so overlaid with the bogus certainties of science, and the equally bogus respect, accorded and expected, on account of his wealth and famous name, that it was only rarely apparent. Once when I was going to London he asked me to take over a case of brandy addressed in large letters to him at his English address. In the guard's van where it was put, among the porters who carried it, wherever it was seen or handled, it aroused an attitude of adoration, real or facetious, as though it had been some holy relic—the bones of a saint or a fragment of the True Cross. Even I partook of its glory, momentarily deputising for this Socialist millionaire, this Rabbinical sceptic, this epicurean ascetic, this Wise Man who had followed the wrong star and found his way to the wrong manger—one complete with chef, central heating and a lift. I think of him in the Avenue Marigny dictating innumerable memoranda, as though in the hope that, if only he dictated enough of them, one would say something; on a basis of the philosophical notion that three monkeys tapping away at typewriters must infallibly, if they keep at it long enough, ultimately tap out the Bible. Rothschild, anyway, did not lack for monkeys. After the war I caught glimpses of him at Cambridge, in think-tanks, once in the Weizmann Institute in Tel Aviv, still dictating memoranda.

External links[edit]