Wikiquote:Dictionary of Legal Quotations/Section 01

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Auditor[edit]

  • It is the duty of the auditor to see that the authority to charge is not made a pretext for extravagance or favouritism.
    • Lush, J., Queen v. Cumherlege (1877), L. R. 2 Q. B. D. 370; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, The Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 17.

Conveyance[edit]

  • There is no magical meaning in the word "conveyance"; it denotes an instrument which carries from one person to another an interest in land. Now, an instrument giving to a person a charge upon land, gives him an interest in the land—if he has a mortgage already, it gives him a further interest.
    • Lord Cairns, L.C., Credland v. Potter (1874), L.R. 10 Ch. Ap. 12; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, The Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 48.
  • The difficulty I really feel is the danger of doing anything which may imperil what has been going on for centuries among conveyancers. Conveyancers have not always stated exactly the truth upon the face of their deeds. No doubt at the present day greater care is taken, but there are some forms which are known, and which are in common use.
    • Chitty, J., Carritt v. Real and Personal Advance Company (1889), L. R. 42 Ch. 272; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, The Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 48.

Domicil[edit]

  • The question of domicil prima facie is much more a question of fact than of law. The actual place, where a person is, is prima facie to a great many given purposes his domicil. You encounter that, if you shew, it is either constrained, or from the necessity of his affairs, or transitory; that he is a sojourner, and you take from it all character of permanency. If, on the contrary, you shew that the place of his residence is the seat of his fortune; if the place of his birth, upon which I lay the least stress; but if the place of his education, where he acquired all his early habits, friends, and connexions, and all the links that attach him to society are found there; if you add to that, that he had no other fixed residence upon an establishment of his own, you answer the question.
    • Lord Loughborough, Bempde t>. Johnstone (1796), 3 Ves. jr. 201; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 76-77.

Inns of Court[edit]

  • The Inns of Court are "voluntary societies, which for ages have submitted to government analogous to that of other seminaries of learning."
    • Lord Mansfield, The King v. Benchers of Gray's Inn, (1780), Doug. 354; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 104.
  • The Templers have no Court of justice within themselves.
    • Holt, C.J., Brown v. Burlace (1697), 3 Salt. 45; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 104.
  • I hope that the system which has prevailed satisfactorily may long continue; but if ever the Inns of Court should make arbitrary rides for the government of their members, and should enter into a contest for students, by abridging the period of study and relaxing the regulations for the exclusion of improper candidates, it will be necessary for the legislature to interpose, and to establish a uniform and efficient discipline by way of preparation for a profession of such importance to the community.
    • Lord Mansfield, The King v. Benchers of Gray's Inn (1780), Doug. 353; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 104.

Law reports[edit]

  • Do you think that a reporter has a right to supply or suppress any part of a judgment?
    • Lord Brougham, Cadell v. Palmer (1833), 1 Cl. & F. 372; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 158.
  • 'Tis pity that reporters sometimes catch at quaint expressions that may happen to be dropped at the Bar or Bench; and mistake their meaning.
    • Lord Mansfield, Miller v. Race (1758), 1 Burr. Part IV. 457; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 158.
  • Imperfect reports of facts and circumstances, especially in cases where every circumstance weigh something in the scale of justice, are the bane of all science that dependeth upon the precedents and examples of former times.
    • Foster, J., "Crown Law Discourse" (ed. 1762), p. 292; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 158.

Legal profession[edit]

  • The interests of justice cannot be upholden, the administration of justice cannot go on without the aid of men skilled in jurisprudence, in the practice of the Courts, and in those matters affecting rights and obligations which form the subject of all proceedings.
    • Brougham, L.C., Greenough v. Gaskell (1833), 1 Myl. & K. 98; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 158.
  • There is nothing which has so great a tendency to secure the due administration of justice, as having the Courts of the country frequented by gentlemen so eminently qualified by their education and principles of honour, as at this time appear to discharge the duties which they are called upon to fulfil.
    • Best, J., Morris v. Hunt (1819), 1 Chit. Rep. 555; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 158-159.
  • Professional advice in England is confined to legal advice.
    • Jessel, M.R., Slade v. Tucker (1880), L. R. 14 C. D. 827; reported in James William Norton-Kyshe, Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904), p. 159.