York Mystery Plays

From Wikiquote
Jump to: navigation, search

The forty-eight York Mystery Plays, or York Miracle Plays, cover sacred history from the Creation to the Last Judgement. The York cycle was written in Middle English by a number of anonymous writers, reaching its final state around 1440. It was performed annually in the streets of York by the city guilds until the 16th century.

Quotes[edit]

The translations used here are by Chester N. Scoville and Kimberley M. Yates. [1]

  • I am gracyus and grete, God withoutyn begynnyng,
    I am maker unmade, all mighte es in me;
    I am lyfe and way unto welth-wynnyng,
    I am formaste and fyrste, als I byd sall it be.
    • I am gracious and great God without beginning.
      I am maker unmade; all might is in me.
      I am life and way, unto weal winning.
      I am foremost and first; as I bid, shall it be.
    • God, in The Barkers' Play: The Fall of the Angels, line 1.
  • O, what I am fetys and fayre and fygured full fytt!
    The forme of all fayrehede apon me es feste,
    All welth in my weelde es, I wote be my wytte;
    The bemes of my brighthede are bygged with the beste.
    My schewyng es schemerande and schynande,
    So bygly to blys am I broghte;
    Me nedes for to noy me righte noghte,
    Here sall never payne me be pynande.
    • Oh, how I am handsome and fair, with figure well fit!
      The form of all fairness upon me holds fast.
      All this wealth's for my wielding, I know by my wit;
      The beams of my brightness compare with the best.
      My appearance is shimmering and shining,
      So securely in bliss I am brought.
      To concern myself, that I need not;
      For no pain here shall bring me to pining.
    • Bad Angel, in The Barkers' Play: The Fall of the Angels, line 65.
  • Owe, certes, what I am worthely wroghte with wyrschip, iwys!
    For in a glorius gle my gleteryng it glemes;
    I am so mightyly made my mirth may noghte mys-
    Ay sall I byde in this blys thorowe brightnes of bemes.
    Me nedes noghte of noy for to neven,
    All welth in my welde have I weledande;
    Abowne yohit sall I be beeldand,
    On heghte in the hyeste of hewuen.
    • Oh, what, how I am worthily wrought with worship like this!
      In a glorious glow, my glittering gleams.
      I am so mightily made that my mirth may not miss;
      I shall abide in this bliss, through my brightness of beams.
      By concern I need never be driven;
      All might in my hand I am wielding;
      Above I shall always be dwelling,
      On high, in the highest of Heaven.
    • Lucifer, in The Barkers' Play: The Fall of the Angels, line 81.
  • I sall be lyke unto hym that es hyeste on heghte.
    Owe, what I am derworth and defte-Owe! Dewes! All goes downe!
    My mighte and my mayne es all marrande-
    Helpe, felawes! In faythe I am fallande.
    • I shall be like the One who is highest on height;
      Oh, how I am worthy and deft – Oh, Deus! All goes down!
      My might and my mirth are unsound;
      I am falling, in faith! Help me, friends!
    • Lucifer, in The Barkers' Play: The Fall of the Angels, line 91.
  • Nowe in my sawle grete joie have I,
    I am all cladde in comforte clere,
    Now will be borne of my body
    Both God and man togedir in feere.
    • Now in my soul great joy have I;
      I am all clad in comfort clear.
      Now will be born of my body
      Both God and man together here.
    • Mary, in The Tile Thatchers' Play: The Nativity, line 50.
  • Hayle my lord God, hayle prince of pees,
    Hayle my fadir, and hayle my sone;
    Hayle sovereyne sege all synnes to sesse,
    Hayle God and man in erth to wonne.
    Hayle, thurgh whos myht
    All this worlde was first begonne,
    Merknes and light.
    • Hail, my lord God, hail prince of peace;
      Hail, my father, and hail, my son;
      Hail, sovereign Lord, all sins to cease;
      Hail, God and man on earth to run;
      Hail, through whose might
      All this world was first begun:
      Darkness and light.
    • Mary, in The Tile Thatchers' Play: The Nativity, line 57.
  • Thus schall the sothe be bought and solde
    And treasoune schall for trewthe be tolde.
    • Thus shall the truth be bought and sold,
      And treason shall as truth be told.
    • Pilate, in The Winedrawers' Play: The Resurrection, line 449.
  • This woffull worlde is brought till ende,
    Mi fadir of heuene he woll it be;
    Therfore till erthe nowe will I wende
    Miselve to sitte in magesté.
    To deme my domes I woll descende;
    This body will I bere with me –
    Howe it was dight, mannes mys to mende,
    All mankynde there schall it see.
    • This woeful world is brought to end,
      My Father in Heaven so wills it be
      Therefore to earth now I will wend,
      To seat myself in majesty.
      To deem my dooms I will descend;
      This body I will bear with me.
      How it was hurt, man's sins to mend,
      All mankind there shall clearly see.
    • Jesus, in The Mercers' Play: The Last Judgement, line 177.

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about: