September 7

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Quotes of the day from previous years:

2004
Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.
2005
I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it. ~ Edith Sitwell (born 7 September 1887)
2006
Eccentricity is not, as dull people would have us believe, a form of madness. It is often a kind of innocent pride, and the man of genius and the aristocrat are frequently regarded as eccentrics because genius and aristocrat are entirely unafraid of and uninfluenced by the opinions and vagaries of the crowd. ~ Edith Sitwell (born 7 September 1887)
2007
Why not be oneself? That is the whole secret of a successful appearance. If one is a greyhound, why try to look like a Pekingese?. ~ Edith Sitwell
2008
The more bombers, the less room for doves of peace. ~ Nikita Khrushchev
2009
I have written my life in small sketches, a little today, a little yesterday, as I have thought of it, as I remember all the things from childhood on through the years, good ones, and unpleasant ones, that is how they come out and that is how we have to take them.
I look back on my life like a good day's work, it was done and I am satisfied with it. I was happy and contented, I knew nothing better and made the best out of what life offered. And life is what we make it, always has been, always will be. ~ Grandma Moses
2010
As for the usefulness of poetry, its uses are many. It is the deification of reality. It should make our days holy to us. The poet should speak to all men, for a moment, of that other life of theirs that they have smothered and forgotten. ~ Edith Sitwell
2011
It is a part of the poet's work to show each man what he sees but does not know he sees. ~ Edith Sitwell
2012
I have often wished I had time to cultivate modesty… But I am too busy thinking about myself.
~ Edith Sitwell ~
2013
Brass shines as fair to the ignorant as gold to the goldsmiths.
~ Elizabeth I of England ~
2014
My poems are hymns of praise to the glory of life.
~ Edith Sitwell ~
2015 
Rank or add further suggestions…

Ranking system:

4 : Excellent - should definitely be used.
3 : Very Good - strong desire to see it used.
2 : Good - some desire to see it used.
1 : Acceptable - but with no particular desire to see it used.
0 : Not acceptable - not appropriate for use as a quote of the day.


Suggestions[edit]

God may forgive you, but I never can. ~ Elizabeth I of England (date of birth)

  • 3 Kalki 22:50, 6 September 2005 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 21:59, 24 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 1 //Gbern3 (talk) 14:45, 23 August 2013 (UTC) No context.

A wise man distrusts his neighbor. A wiser man distrusts both his neighbor and himself. The wisest man of all distrusts his government. ~ Taylor Caldwell

  • 3 Zarbon 06:50, 1 June 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 23:56, 6 September 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 //Gbern3 (talk) 14:45, 23 August 2013 (UTC)

I'll get an inspiration and start painting; then I'll forget everything, everything except how things used to be and how to paint it so people will know how we used to live. ~ Grandma Moses

  • 3 Kalki 23:29, 4 September 2009 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 04:23, 8 September 2009 (UTC)
  • 1 //Gbern3 (talk) 14:45, 23 August 2013 (UTC)

Within your magic web of hair, lies furled
The fire and splendour of the ancient world;
The dire gold of the comet's wind-blown hair;
The songs that turned to gold the evening air
When all the stars of heaven sang for joy.

~ Edith Sitwell

  • 3 Kalki 15:58, 6 September 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.
  • 1 Zarbon 04:23, 8 September 2009 (UTC)
  • 1 //Gbern3 (talk) 14:45, 23 August 2013 (UTC)

It is a stern fact of history that no nation that rushed to the abyss ever turned back. Not ever, in the long history of the world. We are now on the edge of the abyss. Can we, for the first time in history, turn back? It is up to you. ~ Taylor Caldwell


When a nation threatens another nation the people of the latter forget their factionalism, their local antagonisms, their political differences, their suspicions of each other, their religious hostilities, and band together as one unit. Leaders know that, and that is why so many of them whip up wars during periods of national crisis, or when the people become discontented and angry. The leaders stigmatize the enemy with every vice they can think of, every evil and human depravity. They stimulate their people’s natural fear of all other men by channeling it into a defined fear of just certain men, or nations. Attacking another nation, then, acts as a sort of catharsis, temporarily, on men’s fear of their immediate neighbors. This is the explanation of all wars, all racial and religious hatreds, all massacres, and all attempts at genocide.
~ Taylor Caldwell ~