Yakoub Islam

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The Muslim Anarchist Charter rejects absolutely:
all forms of violence and political coercion;
all forms of racism and prejudice, including Islamophobia, homophobia and neurelitism.

Yunus Yakoub Islam (born Julian Hoare in 1963), aka Julian Anderson, is a UK-based muslim blogger, poet, Islamic anarchist and cyber-activist who describes his politics as "postcolonial anarcho-pacifist".

Quotes[edit]

Captain Jul's Mission Blog (2011 - 2013)[edit]

Al-Buraq to Earth. Contact made. Link established with planet Earth.
I am far from convinced that energy spent doing damage to life, limb and property is likely to prove more productive than properly thought-out and planned non-violent direct action.
More likely the opposite.
  • Al-Buraq to Earth. Contact made. Link established with planet Earth. Kamal, onboard computer, setting up Mission Log in accordance with first contact communication protocols. Set up complete.
    Awaiting further instructions.
    • Al-Buraq to Earth (23 July 2011)
  • I'm a long-haul Cosmic anthropologist, which means I hop around isolate-planets (like Earth) in order to study Advanced Language Species (like homo sapiens). I specialise in First Stage Globalization (FSG) terrestrials. Most FSG planets have whole-world silicon-based communication technologies in situ, and thus as soon as I’m near enough, I ’plug in’, and shortly after make contact. Well, I’ve been plugged in for quite some time, but this is my first contact. Sorry about that.
    • "Commence Commence Commence" (24 July 2011)
  • Al-Buraq to Earth. Contact made. Kamal, onboard computer, setting up link between (1) mind of mixed-species hominid on Planet Earth, and (2) cortico helmet of Captain Jul. Scanning planet for mixed-species hominid. One mixed-species hominid identified. Name: Yakoub Islam. Consent obtained. Link established with Yakoub’s mind.
    Set up complete.
    • Earth-Mind Link (25 July 2011)
  • We’ve been listening into and watching your planet’s radio and television transmissions ever since Reginald Fessenden proclaimed, ‘Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace to men of good willies’, back in 1906. Since then, our research at the University of Weagu Tafrid has focused primarily on the concept of human “celebrity”.
    • Intergalactic Fame (29 July 2011)
  • Celebrity has merged human institutions into a “much-of-a-mulchness”, such that the values surrounding political leaders and infamous sex workers are becoming increasingly indistinguisable.
    • Intergalactic Fame (29 July 2011)
  • Riots may be symptoms of a deeper socio-political malaise: the product of unjust government policy and racist policing. I know from friends I have spoken to who were participants in the 1981 Brixton riots, that riots can engender a great deal of local solidarity against an oppressive State. But I am far from convinced that energy spent doing damage to life, limb and property is likely to prove more productive than properly thought-out and planned non-violent direct action.
    More likely the opposite.
    • "Anarchism Against Riots" (7 August 2011)
  • There is, I believe, a great deal to be learned from faith traditions – from the ordinary people who practice them today; from their sacred texts and writings and artefacts; and from their histories. Faith traditions present a rich and diverse vein of human experience, and I am convinced that — as with other humanities — a serious interest in them is a cultural education in itself.
    • "Oh, God! It’s Religion!" (22 August 2011)
  • Learning is something I’m good at, given the right conditions. Drop me in the middle of an academic subject I care about, and that has relatively clearly defined boundaries, and I can do "expert" more quickly and more comprehensively than most. It’s not vacuous memorization: I’m no savant. What I do is create a schema of fundamental knowledge and understandings, usually over-learned using SQ3R, and that schema then becomes a powerful magnet for related information.
    • "Autism: the knowledge" (27 November 2011)

External links[edit]