Anu Garg

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I have a dream where society will replace guns with dictionaries.

Anu Garg (born April 5, 1967) is an American author, speaker, and columnist. He is the founder of Wordsmith.org, an online community of wordlovers. He writes about language, words and their origins.

A large vocabulary is like an artist having a big palette of colors. We don't have to use all the colors in a single painting, but it helps to be able to find just the right shade when we need it.

Quotes[edit]

  • I have a dream where society will replace guns with dictionaries.
    • Chelminski, Rudolph (1 February 2002), "The Wondiferous Wizard of Words", Reader's Digest 
  • English never met a word it didn't like.
    • On English's propensity to borrow words from other languages, quoted in Chelminski, Rudolph (1 December 2000), "WARNING: Log-o-phil-ia is Addictive", Smithsonian 
  • There are exotic species of words jumping out inviting me to play. I weave them into a theme, a garland of words.
    • Chelminski, Rudolph (1 December 2000), "WARNING: Log-o-phil-ia is Addictive", Smithsonian 
  • Browsing the OED is the idea of a perfect day for me.
    • Susan G. Hauser (26 September 2001), "A Word a Day -- Say, 'Gasconade' -- Keeps Boredom at Bay", The Wall Street Journal 
Like a human being, each word has a story. To understand a word, we need to learn where it was born, what paths it took to reach where it is today and how it has changed along the way.
  • [T]hat's how a language grows. Old words die - or take on a new life. New words appear. Language wordstock is replenished, refreshed, and the language remains vibrant and serviceable, ready to describe new concepts, ideas, and objects. Many language purists object to this way of growth. But we have to remember that just as yesterday's liberal is often tomorrow's conservative, in many cases, what was considered slang in the past, eventually acquires respectability.
    • As quoted in Dickson, Paul (2014), Authorisms: Words Wrought by Writers 
  • For as long as I can recall, I enjoyed reading. I literally read books from cover to cover. Then I started wondering where words come from. Who made them up? Who said that that opening in a wall was to be called a window? Then I discovered that each word comes with a biography. These words have fascinating stories to tell, if only we take the time to listen. For example, the word window comes from Old Norse in which it meant wind's eye. How much more poetic can you get?
If you speak English, you speak at least a part of more than a hundred languages.
  • If you speak English, you speak at least a part of more than a hundred languages.
    • As quoted in Arditti, Avi (15 November 2005), VOA News 
  • Overall, the universe's apostrophe store stays in balance. It seems our linguistic world was intelligently designed -- for every gratuitous apostrophe there's an instance where it's omitted.
  • Like a human being, each word has a story. To understand a word, we need to learn where it was born, what paths it took to reach where it is today and how it has changed along the way.

About Anu Garg[edit]

  • Only Anu Garg, the founder of Wordsmith.org, can make word facts this much fun.
  • AWADies will be familiar with Anu Garg's refreshing approach to words: words are fun and they have fascinating histories.

External links[edit]

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