April 5

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Quotes of the day from previous years:

2004
Life is too deep for words, so don't try to describe it, just live it. ~ C.S. Lewis
2005
Words are wise men's counters, they do but reckon by them; but they are the money of fools. ~ Thomas Hobbes (born 5 April 1588)
2006
Do not that to another, which thou wouldest not have done to thy selfe. ~ Thomas Hobbes (born 5 April 1588)
2007
The world is fast learning that of all forms of slavery there is none that is so harmful and degrading as that form of slavery which tempts one human being to hate another by reason of his race or color. One man cannot hold another man down in the ditch without remaining down in the ditch with him. ~ Booker T. Washington (born 5 April 1856)
2008
I learned the lesson that great men cultivate love, and that only little men cherish a spirit of hatred. I learned that assistance given to the weak makes the one who gives it strong; and that oppression of the unfortunate makes one weak. ~ Booker T. Washington
2009
God's own hand
Holds fast all issues of our deeds: with him
The end of all our ends is, but with us
Our ends are, just or unjust: though our works
Find righteous or unrighteous judgment, this
At least is ours, to make them righteous.

~ Algernon Charles Swinburne ~
2010
Leadership is the art of accomplishing more than the science of management says is possible. ~ Colin Powell (born April 5)
2011
At the door of life, by the gate of breath,
There are worse things waiting for men than death;
Death could not sever my soul and you,
As these have severed your soul from me.

~ Algernon Charles Swinburne ~
2012
O my Father, if this cup may not pass away from me, except I drink it, thy will be done. ~ Jesus
2013
In any country, regardless of what its laws say, wherever people act upon the idea that the disadvantage of one man is the good of another, there slavery exists. Wherever, in any country the whole people feel that the happiness of all is dependent upon the happiness of the weakest, there freedom exists.
~ Booker T. Washington ~
2014
Such is the nature of men, that howsoever they may acknowledge many others to be more witty, or more eloquent, or more learned; Yet they will hardly believe there be many so wise as themselves: For they see their own wit at hand, and other men's at a distance.
~ Thomas Hobbes ~
2015 
Rank or add further suggestions…

Quotes by people born this day, already used as QOTD:


Ranking system:

4 : Excellent - should definitely be used.
3 : Very Good - strong desire to see it used.
2 : Good - some desire to see it used.
1 : Acceptable - but with no particular desire to see it used.
0 : Not acceptable - not appropriate for use as a quote of the day.


Suggestions[edit]

I would permit no man, no matter what his colour might be, to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him. ~ Booker T. Washington (born April 5, 1856)

  • 3 InvisibleSun 17:11, 3 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 12:53, 4 April 2007 (UTC) I would rank this higher, but a variant of this has already been used.
  • 2 because hatred would make one transform into the thing he avoids to become. To hate is to be the same as the hated. Zarbon 23:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

My whole life has largely been one of surprises. I believe that any man's life will be filled with constant, unexpected encouragements of this kind if he makes up his mind to do his level best each day of his life — that is, tries to make each day reach as nearly as possible the high-water mark of pure, unselfish, useful living. ~ Booker T. Washington

  • 3 Kalki 12:53, 4 April 2007 (UTC) with a strong lean toward 4.
  • 3 InvisibleSun 13:04, 4 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 23:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

In the first place, I put for a general inclination of all mankind a perpetual and restless desire of power after power, that ceaseth only in death. And the cause of this is not always that a man hopes for a more intensive delight than he has already attained to, or that he cannot be content with a moderate power, but because he cannot assure the power and means to live well, which he hath present, without the acquisition of more. ~ Thomas Hobbes

  • 2 Kalki 20:32, 4 April 2009 (UTC) 3 Kalki 12:53, 4 April 2007 (UTC) though this remains largely true, there are other quotes which have been suggested which I strongly prefer, and have a very strong preference for a remark by Swinburne I have added today. If this one were to be used, I would also prefer to trim "In the first place" as unnecessary and referential to prior unquoted comments. ~ Kalki 20:32, 4 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 4 InvisibleSun 13:04, 4 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 23:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Man gives indifferent names to one and the same thing from the difference of their own passions; as they that approve a private opinion call it opinion; but they that mislike it, heresy: and yet heresy signifies no more than private opinion. ~ Thomas Hobbes

  • 3 Kalki 12:53, 4 April 2007 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.
  • 3 InvisibleSun 13:04, 4 April 2007 (UTC)
  • 1 Zarbon 23:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

Such truth as opposeth no man's profit nor pleasure is to all men welcome. ~ Thomas Hobbes


Of all manifestations of power, restraint impresses men most. ~ Colin Powell (born April 5)

  • 3 because everyone can attack, but it takes a man of high caliber to restrain oneself. Zarbon 17:06, 22 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 04:54, 29 March 2009 (UTC) (but this is a quote of Thucydides which Powell used, and should be noted as such — and thus I am inclined to rank at 3 if properly cited.)
  • 2 if credited to Thucydides. - InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

Excellence is not an exception, it is a prevailing attitude. ~ Colin Powell (born April 5)

  • 3 because this is a principle to live by. Zarbon 17:06, 22 April 2008 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 04:54, 29 March 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 3.
  • 2 InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

Men may make laws to hinder and fetter the ballot, but men cannot make laws that will bind or retard the growth of manhood. ~ Booker T. Washington

  • 3 because once mankind is growing, laws cannot repress knowledge. Zarbon 04:54, 3 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 04:54, 29 March 2009 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

Character, not circumstances, makes the man. ~ Booker T. Washington

  • 3 because everyone can be placed under the same circumstances...but sometimes, it is the man's character that differentiates him from others. Zarbon 04:54, 3 May 2008 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 04:54, 29 March 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

Before the beginning of years
There came to the making of man
Time with a gift of tears,
Grief with a glass that ran,
Pleasure with pain for leaven,
Summer with flowers that fell,
Remembrance fallen from heaven,
And Madness risen from hell,
Strength without hands to smite,
Love that endures for a breath;
Night, the shadow of light,
And Life, the shadow of death.
~ Algernon Charles Swinburne

  • 2 Zarbon 04:16, 31 March 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 3, or eventual 4.
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

When the hounds of spring are on winter's traces,
The mother of months in meadow or plain
Fills the shadows and windy places
With lisp of leaves and ripple of rain.
~ Algernon Charles Swinburne


If love were what the rose is,
And I were like the leaf,
Our lives would grow together
In sad or singing weather,
Blown fields or flowerful closes,
Green pasture or gray grief;
If love were what the rose is,
And I were like the leaf.
~ Algernon Charles Swinburne


Forget that I remember
And dream that I forget.
~ Algernon Charles Swinburne

  • 3 Zarbon 04:16, 31 March 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC) needs more context.
  • 2 InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

Dream that the lips once breathless
Might quicken if they would;
Say that the soul is deathless;
Dream that the gods are good;
Say March may wed September,
And time divorce regret;
But not that you remember,
And not that I forget.
~ Algernon Charles Swinburne


For in the days we know not of
Did fate begin
Weaving the web of days that wove
Your doom.
~ Algernon Charles Swinburne

  • 3 Zarbon 04:16, 31 March 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC) (but would trim the first word, as there really isn't much context here, without the preceding stanza of the poem "Faustine" and the final words of this one.
  • 2 InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

I remember the way we parted,
The day and the way we met;
You hoped we were both broken-hearted
And knew we should both forget.
~ Algernon Charles Swinburne


And the best and the worst of this is
That neither is most to blame,
If you have forgotten my kisses
And I have forgotten your name.
~ Algernon Charles Swinburne


Not with dreams, but with blood and with iron,
Shall a nation be moulded at last.
~ Algernon Charles Swinburne

  • 3 Zarbon 04:16, 31 March 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 3.
  • 2 InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

Fear that makes faith may break faith. ~ Algernon Charles Swinburne

  • 3 and lean toward 4. Zarbon 04:16, 31 March 2009 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC) but only if extended to read:
Fear that makes faith may break faith; and a fool Is but in folly stable.
  • 3 for the extended quote. - InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

Sudden glory is the passion which maketh those grimaces called laughter. ~ Thomas Hobbes

  • 3 Zarbon 04:16, 31 March 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 3.
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

To this war of every man against every man, this also is consequent; that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice have there no place. Where there is no common power, there is no law, where no law, no injustice. Force, and fraud, are in war the cardinal virtues. ~ Thomas Hobbes

  • 3 Zarbon 04:16, 31 March 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC) the full context is not provided by this, but I could rank it a 3 or 4 eventually if extended to read:
Though there had never been any time wherein particular men were in a condition of war one against another, yet in all times kings and persons of sovereign authority, because of their independency, are in continual jealousies, and in the state and posture of gladiators, having their weapons pointing, and their eyes fixed on one another; that is, their forts, garrisons, and guns upon the frontiers of their kingdoms, and continual spies upon their neighbours, which is a posture of war. But because they uphold thereby the industry of their subjects, there does not follow from it that misery which accompanies the liberty of particular men.
To this war of every man against every man, this also is consequent; that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice have there no place. Where there is no common power, there is no law, where no law, no injustice. Force, and fraud, are in war the cardinal virtues.
  • 3 for either form of the quote. - InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

No arts; no letters; no society; and which is worst of all, continual fear and danger of violent death; and the life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short. ~ Thomas Hobbes

  • 3 Zarbon 04:16, 31 March 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC) there is too little context within this and the previous quote to provide clear and proper sense of what Hobbes was actually saying, and I would prefer to extend this considerably to indicate more of that, and in extended form I could rank it a 3 or a 4:
Whatsoever therefore is consequent to a time of war, where every man is enemy to every man, the same consequent to the time wherein men live without other security than what their own strength and their own invention shall furnish them withal. In such condition there is no place for industry, because the fruit thereof is uncertain: and consequently no culture of the earth; no navigation, nor use of the commodities that may be imported by sea; no commodious building; no instruments of moving and removing such things as require much force; no knowledge of the face of the earth; no account of time; no arts; no letters; no society; and which is worst of all, continual fear, and danger of violent death; and the life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.
  • 3 for the extended quote. - InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

The source of every crime, is some defect of the understanding; or some error in reasoning; or some sudden force of the passions. ~ Thomas Hobbes

  • 2 Zarbon 04:16, 31 March 2009 (UTC)
  • 3 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

War consisteth not in battle only, or the act of fighting, but in a tract of time, wherein the will to contend by battle is sufficiently known: and therefore the notion of time is to be considered in the nature of war, as it is in the nature of weather. For as the nature of foul weather lieth not in a shower or two of rain, but in an inclination thereto of many days together: so the nature of war consisteth not in actual fighting, but in the known disposition thereto during all the time there is no assurance to the contrary. All other time is peace. ~ Thomas Hobbes

  • 3 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.
  • 1 with a lean toward 2. Zarbon 18:15, 4 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

The passions that incline men to peace are: fear of death; desire of such things as are necessary to commodious living; and a hope by their industry to obtain them. And reason suggesteth convenient articles of peace upon which men may be drawn to agreement. These articles are they which otherwise are called the laws of nature... ~ Thomas Hobbes

  • 3 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 Zarbon 18:15, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

To promise that which is known to be impossible is no covenant. But if that prove impossible afterwards, which before was thought possible, the covenant is valid and bindeth, though not to the thing itself, yet to the value; or, if that also be impossible, to the unfeigned endeavour of performing as much as is possible, for to more no man can be obliged.
Men are freed of their covenants two ways; by performing, or by being forgiven. For performance is the natural end of obligation, and forgiveness the restitution of liberty, as being a retransferring of that right in which the obligation consisted. ~ Thomas Hobbes

  • 3 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.
  • 1 Zarbon 18:15, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

Not from without us, only from within,
Comes or can ever come upon us light
Whereby the soul keeps ever truth in sight.

~ Algernon Charles Swinburne ~

  • 3 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.
  • 2 Zarbon 18:15, 4 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 2 InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

Being come to flood and fullness now, the tide
Is risen in mine as in the sea's own heart
To tempest and to triumph. Not for nought
Am I that wild wife's bridegroom — old and hoar,
Not sapless yet nor soulless.

~ Algernon Charles Swinburne

  • 3 Kalki 15:21, 4 April 2009 (UTC) with a lean toward 4.
  • 1 Zarbon 18:15, 4 April 2009 (UTC)
  • 3 InvisibleSun 22:47, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

Apple makes the arrogant assumption of thinking that it knows what you want and need. It, unfortunately, leaves the “why” out of the equation — as in “why would I want this?” The Macintosh uses an experimental pointing device called a “mouse”. There is no evidence that people want to use these things. I don’t want one of these new fangled devices. ~ John C. Dvorak


The absolute deterioration of the wiki concept is just a matter of time. ~ John C. Dvorak


We take no note of time but from its loss. ~ Edward Young