Choha

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Choha, or Doppo-an Choha, (1703 - 1740) was a japanese haiku poet.

Quotes[edit]

Quotes about Choha[edit]

  • The printmakers made an economical use of the medium in producing Deer in the Snow, and the low-key palette and the bold outline led to a curiously affecting picture, the contrast of the timid animal and the stark drift of snow suggesting a suggesting a sentimentality not normally found in Toyo's work... It is one of those limited-edition books called kubari-hon, private publications, compiled in this case by a coterie of haiku poets to commemorate the 17th anniversary of the death of Doppo-an Choha (1703-1740), whom they revered as their teacher.
    • Jack Ronald Hillier. The Japanese picture book: a selection from the Ravicz Collection. 1991.
  • And then there are those poems so absorbed in the great unknown that death becomes nearly indistinguishable from life. The jisei of Rankei Doryu, who died in 1278, reads:
Thirty years and more
I worked to nullify myself.
Now I leap the leap of death.
The ground churns up
The skies spin round.
The death haiku of Choha, who died in 1740, also evokes this silence.