Jayachamarajendra Wadiyar

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Jayachamarajendra Wadiyar was the 25th and the last Maharaja of the princely state of Mysore from 1940 to 1950

His Highness Maharaja Sri Sir Jayachamarajendra Wadiyar Bahadur, Maharaja of Mysore ,GCB, GCSI (July 18, 1919September 23, 1974) aka Jaya Chamarajendra Wadiyar or Chamaraja Wadiyar XI, was the 25th and the last Maharaja of the princely state of Mysore from 1940 to 1950. He was the only son of Yuvaraja Kanteerava Narasimharaja Wadiyar and Yuvarani Kempu Cheluvaja Amanni. Wodeyar dynasty is the only Royal Family from Mysore and belong to Lunar Dynasty (Chandrvanshi Kshatriya lineage). He graduated from the Maharaja's College, Mysore in 1938, earning five awards and gold medals. He signed the Instrument of Accession with the Dominion of India on the eve of India attaining Independence in August 1947. He was a great lover of music and literature. He had a special interest in Western music. He was a noted philosopher, musicologist, political thinker and [[w:{hilanthropist|philanthropist]] and the Founder-President of Vishva Hindu Parishad (World Hindu Council). He was the recipient of D.Lit from Queensland University, Australia, Doctor of Law from Banaras University, and D.Lit from Annamalai University. He was honorary Fellow of Trinity College of Music, London, in the year 1945.

Quotes[edit]

...called upon people to ‘consecrate themselves in the spirit of unity and self sacrifice.
Jayachamarajendra Wadiyar:The advent of Atombomb into a world of varying moral standards and uncertain international friendships has made everyone aware for the first time of the awful fact that, if the world ever lost its spiritual and moral equilibrium, it was now possible completely to eliminate life itself.
Jayachamarajendra Wadiyar:He was not merely the organizer and architect of our freedom, he ennobled our very being. As the apostle not only of truth and ahimsa but also of purity and public conduct he raised us, and indeed the whole of mankind, to a higher level of social and political life.
  • In succeeding to the throne of Mysore, I follow a great ruler who loved you all, and who won your love by his love of God, by his wisdom, his graciousness, his humility, his faithfulness to his duty and his Kingly greatness; ...called upon people to ‘consecrate themselves in the spirit of unity and self sacrifice.
  • You have referred in your address to what your generosity has termed my ‘sacrifice’. I do not look upon it as such. If destiny had decreed that over the past few centuries the progress and the prosperity of the people of this beloved State, should be in the hands of the Wadeyars of Mysore, then that same destiny now ordains that the time is ripe for the people, now grown to full political stature in a free democratic Republic, to rule themselves ...the rule of the Maharajas has indeed fulfilled its purpose, the purpose of making the people fit to rule themselves.
    • On his 37th birthday in his reply to an address presented to him by the Chief Minister on 29 July 1956, quoted in "Jaya Chamaraja Wodeyar".
  • It is important that the freedom we have attained after a hundred years of struggle should be felt and enjoyed by the millions. Let us therefore model our Swarajya after the conception of Rishis. Let us aspire to achieve the Rama Rajya of Gandhiji’s dreams.
    • Known for his erudite scholarship in Indian philosophy and Dharma, he gave a talk on the Radio on the occasion of the ninth year of the Republic in 1958. Quoted in "Jaya Chamaraja Wodeyar".
  • The advent of Atombomb into a world of varying moral standards and uncertain international friendships has made everyone aware for the first time of the awful fact that, if the world ever lost its spiritual and moral equilibrium, it was now possible completely to eliminate life itself.
    • During his scholarly lecture tours as a philosopher, in Ghana, quoted in "Jayachamaraja Wodeyar – A Princely scholar".
  • Education has a great part to play in assuring the intellectual and moral basis not only for citizenship of the state but also for that world citizenship which is the imperative need of the time. For education to serve the purposes of democracy and world citizenship it should it should be in a real sense “liberal.”
    • During his scholarly lecture tours as a philosopher, in Ghana, quoted in "Jayachamaraja Wodeyar – A Princely scholar".
  • ...the Indian tradition of non-violence and purity of motive and means, the tradition of ethical and religious approach to all political questions and noted that these had found a perfect embodiment in Mahatma Gandhi...One could draw up a whole declaration of human rights in terms of ahimsa. If individuals and nations are animated by such a belief in a beneficent Supreme Power; in truth and in human brotherhood, we can look forward to a future free from anxiety and fear and full of hope and promise of happiness.
    • In another of his speeches on Indian tradition quoted in "Jayachamaraja Wodeyar – A Princely scholar".
  • May those in distress become happy, May the sins of animate and inanimate beings disappear, may the evils of the universe be destroyed.
    • At the conclusion of his speech on Indian tradition he recited a passage from Matsyapurana, quoted in "Jayachamaraja Wodeyar – A Princely scholar".
  • He was not merely the organizer and architect of our freedom, he ennobled our very being. As the apostle not only of truth and ahimsa but also of purity and public conduct he raised us, and indeed the whole of mankind, to a higher level of social and political life.
    • In his homage of reverence, love and thankfulness in memory of Mahatma Gandhi, at an Independence Day lecture in 1959 as Governor. Quoted in "Jayachamaraja Wodeyar – A Princely scholar".
  • An independent nation cannot function without its own national language. That English should be replaced by our own language as a patriotic necessity. But so far as University education is concerned at any rate, it appears prudent to delay the change-over until our linguistic consolidation has proceeded further and our own languages have become more adequately equipped with the machinery of modern learning,- encyclopedias, dictionaries, reference books, treatises, text books, and a widely intelligible vocabulary of technical terms of modern science … the most elaborate code of ethical conduct that anyone could draw up cannot go much beyond the simple exhortation of The Upanishad’s Satyam vada, Dharmam cara [speak the truth, act nobly]. These should be the watch-words of our public and private life.
  • It has been accepted now that the joy of art is the heritage of all and aesthetic activity and appreciation are indispensable aids in the enrichment and refinement of the human soul in general. Art refines our inner as well as our physical life and provides that satisfaction and joy which acquisitions and activities on a merely material plane can never give. As Nachiketa said, na vittena tarpaniyo manushyo. In other words, man does not live by bread alone. Music and dance, among the arts, have always had a high place in Indian aesthetics. They are conceived as having their origin in the Divine, which is itself described the Upanishads as the quintessence of aesthetic pleasure raso vai sah. Our arts embody the deepest experience and wisdom of mankind, and they have a spiritual import and purpose.
    • During another lecture in Madras (now Chennai) based on his experience in Music having composed a number of kirtans on “Devi” . Quoted in "Jayachamaraja Wodeyar – A Princely scholar".
  • Wodeyar's musical output numbers close to 100 kritis [Compositions]. The nature of this output, whether it is in the choice of ragas like Bhanu Chandrika, Hamsanatini and Bhoopala Panchama, or in the lyrics which carry deep meanings drawn form the Upanishads and Srividya worship, show a keen and intelligent mind at work. Fascinating as the life was of this multi-faceted personality, it also had a poignancy for the trials and tribulations he faced.
Freemasons' Hall, London
  • I have been attracted to Freemasonry of my own freewill and accord, because it is an International Brotherhood with worldwide interests and its spirit appears as comprehensive and embracing as the globe itself. This brotherhood represents an idealism in which national and racial boundaries find no place. Freemasonry places the fact of God, the Great Architect of the Universe, the Creator of all things in the forefront of its teaching. It recognizes no specific religion, but emphasizes the Universality of all religious faiths. From the limited experience, I have had of my formal admission to the Fraternity this evening, I see that there is a religious spirit underlying the whole symbolic teaching of Masonry. It seems to me that apart from the rituals and symbols peculiar to it, the object of Masonry is generally to make the world a better, brighter and happier place to live in. These are some of the more important and characteristic features of the institution, which have had the greatest appeal to me and that is how I find myself to be one with you from now onwards.
  • We were all at one time in darkness and we sought the eternal light and the enlightened ones among us got that light. The light that we got is not merely the light of intellectual illumination that Diogenes referred to, but also the light of ethical perfection, a better set of morals, a higher code of ethics and better living standards based on charity, helpfulness and sympathy.
    • In his address to the members of the Masonic Fraternity on the occassion of his joining as member of the Masonic Lodge. quoted in "Article # 14 Initiate responds to his Toast R.W.Bro. Jaya Chamaraja Wadeyar".
  • Masonically we are heirs of past. Our Masonic ancestors gave the craft devotion, loyalty and faith and made it an illustrious institution in the world. It should be our religious duty to appreciate and conserve the rich inheritance. In view of the increasing complexity of life and the maintenance of the best and highest traditions of the Craft, great care and concern should be displayed, if Freemasonry has to function in the best interests of humanity. It has been truly said, that an inspired and inspiring dedication to service should be the part of every Mason’s life. Let us not give in to skepticism. There is all the difference between a pessimist and an optimist, in any field of human endeavour. One looks at his glass and cries “My glass is half empty”. The optimist looks and exclaims “My glass is half full”.
    • In his address to the members of the Masonic Fraternity on the occassion of his joining as member of the Masonic Lodge. quoted in "Article # 14 Initiate responds to his Toast R.W.Bro. Jaya Chamaraja Wadeyar".
  • Brethren, let me close with a note of buoyant optimism and also a word of caution that masonry is not always on trial, but we, as Masons, are perpetually on trial. Let us remind ourselves that Masonry represents Manhood at its best and let me venture to express the hope that in building the City of Fraternity or what W.M Mallaradya more appropriately calls it, the Ideal Temple of Humanity and in fostering its growth, we shall be able to qualify ourselves to be men of true enlightenment, character, integrity, gentility and sympathetic understanding and Masons with a burning desire to dedicate ourselves to the service of humanity in our own limited sphere of activity.
    • In his address to the members of the Masonic Fraternity on the occassion of his joining as member of the Masonic Lodge. quoted in "Article # 14 Initiate responds to his Toast R.W.Bro. Jaya Chamaraja Wadeyar".
  • the speed and energy of a demon, not an angel or superman as one would ardently hope for.
    • His opinion on Arturo Toscanini’s recordings which indicated his “understanding of music—individualistically interpretive, personal and profound—allowed him to see beyond known and accepted horizons. Quoted in "Medtner, Music & a Maharaja".

About Jayachamarajendra Wadiyar[edit]

  • His views on matters of fine art were appreciated by everyone not only in India but also abroad.
  • [He was] awarded the Sangeet Natak Akademi's fellowship for the year 1966/67 on October 13, 1966. Such a gentle and erudite soul did not have a peaceful personal life. Ill health plagued him and so did sordid palace intrigues over his vast properties.
  • He was the first president of the Philharmonia Concert Society, London in 1948.
  • The visit to Mysore was a fantastic experience. The Maharajah was a young man, not yet thirty. In one of his palaces he had a record library containing every imaginable recordings of serious music, a large range of loud speakers, and several concert grand pianos....
    • Walter Legge, who was invited to Mysore by the Maharaja. Quoted in "Medtner, Music & a Maharaja"
  • A royal connoisseur Jayachamarajendra Wodeyar’s tryst with music began with western music, of which he was deeply knowledgeable on many levels. The Maharaja was a gifted pianist. He had nurtured hopes of becoming a concert pianist; a dream that necessarily ended with his ascension to the throne. He was a Licentiate of the Guildhall School of Music, London;an honorary Fellow of Trinity College of Music, London; and the first president of the Philharmonia Concert Society, London
  • In the weeks I stayed there, the Maharajah agreed to paying for the recordings of the Medtner piano concertos, an album of his songs, and some of his chamber music; he also agreed to give me a subvention of 10,000 pounds a year for three years to enable me to put the Philharmonia Orchestra and the Philharmonia Concert society on firm basis....
  • The Maharaja was not only a great scholar but also liked the company of scholars and to listen to their words of wisdom and knowledge. He used to arrange study circles regularly in a serene place in the City.
    • A.V. Narasimha Murthy, in "When the Maharaja’s son failed an examination".
  • Man of the masses.
    • Devaraja Urs expressing shock and grief at the demise of the Maharaja on 23 September 1974 which brought to an end the 600- year regime of one of the longest reigning Indian ruling houses, in Splendours Of Royal Mysore (PB), p. 592

My daddy, His Highness, the Maharaja of Mysore[edit]

Meenakshi Devi:The word ‘No’ was never there for anything with him. He was kind hearted and generous to a fault. As a father, he was one of the best persons in the world. He used to be very fond of all his children. He used to spend time with all of us in spite of his busy schedule.

Meenakshi Devi, My daddy, His Highness, the Maharaja of Mysore

  • The word ‘No’ was never there for anything with him. He was kind hearted and generous to a fault. As a father, he was one of the best persons in the world. He used to be very fond of all his children. He used to spend time with all of us in spite of his busy schedule.
  • The moment I think of my father Jayachamaraja Wadiyar (that is how he used to sign), the last king of Mysore, the image that comes to mind is his tall (over 6 ft), handsome, regal bearing, with a slant when he walked and his goodness. All this and more is true of him.
  • We are six children, five daughters and a son to our parents. Gayathri Devi, myself, Srikantadatta Narasimharaja Wadiyar, Kamakshi Devi, Indrakshi Devi and Vishalakshi Devi. As children we all went to the Palace School inside the palace premises itself. Daddy used to discuss various subjects when we were studying in school and college. His favourite subject was history.
  • Though we had a sheltered life in the palace, Daddy brought us up the same way any father would bring up his children.
  • Whenever my mother went to Bangalore, Daddy would spend a lot of time with us. He would take us all to Chamundi hill in the yellow and red sports Rolls Royce car, which he himself would drive. Of course we also had a Daimler and Austin Prince.
  • The other special moments that I can recall is when I used to ride piggyback on him as a child.
  • He never discriminated between us children. He got us to learn horse riding. He always used to take us out shooting when hunting was still allowed. My first experience was a tiger hunt when I was 14-year old. We went to Omkar, a favourite hunting place of my father which lies between Begur and Kakanakote forest range. I shot a spotted deer with Daddy’s supervision.
  • Another time we had gone to the Kakanakote forest. I had a camera in my hand. I suddenly spotted a tusker and I was very excited. My Daddy with his typical sense of humour said, Enamma, kaielli camera itkondu photone thegithaillavalla. (What, child, you have a camera in hand and you are not taking a photograph).
  • He never scolded any of his children even once. My mother was more strict and she used to cane us once in a way when we became very mischievous. When the privy purses were abolished in 1969, he was very upset though he did not show it.
  • My Daddy’s last days were a bit traumatic. The biggest blow for him was the passing away of my elder sister Gayathri Devi of cancer in July 1974. He was not able to take the blow as he was very fond of her. He passed away the same year in September.

External links[edit]

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